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I'm trying to insert a comment character into a string something similar to this:

-CreateVideoTracker VT1 "vt name"

becomes

-CreateVideoTracker VT1 # "vt name"

The VT1 word can actually be anything, so I'm using the regex

$line =~ s/\-CreateVideoTracker \w/\-CreateVideoTracker \w # /g;

which gives me the result:

-CreateVideoTracker w #T1 "vt name"

Is there any way to do this with a single regex, or do I need to split up the string and insert the comment manually?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted
$line =~ s/^(\-CreateVideoTracker)\s+(\w+)/$1 $2 #/;

The bracketed expressions (known as "capture buffers") in the first half of the regexp are referenced as $1, $2. etc in the second half.

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You could use the \K feature of Perl 5.10 regexs;

$line=~s/^\-CreateVideoTracker\s+\w+\K/ #/;
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Good point! This \K switch is called "zero-width positive look-behind assertion" (in the section on "Look-Around Assertions") and I think it is superior to the old replacement mechanism using capturing and $1. –  Lumi May 20 '11 at 13:30
(?<=-CreateVideoTracker\s[^\s]*)(?<replacemelolkthx>\s)

replace with " # "

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Crap, wrong language –  Will Nov 12 '08 at 18:00
    
That's ok, I didn't specify that it had to be Perl –  bsruth Nov 12 '08 at 20:00

You have two problems in:

$line =~ s/\-CreateVideoTracker \w/\-CreateVideoTracker \w # /g;

First, you want to match multiple character words, so in the left side, \w should be \w+. Second, you can't use patterns like \w on the right side; instead capture what you want on the left with () and put it on the right with $1, $2, etc.:

$line =~ s/\-CreateVideoTracker (\w+)/\-CreateVideoTracker $1 # /g;
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