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I started working with C# a few weeks ago and I'm now in a situation where I need to build up a "bit set" flag to handle different cases in an algorithm. I have thus two options:

    enum RelativePositioning
    {
        LEFT = 0,
        RIGHT = 1,
        BOTTOM  = 2,
        TOP = 3,
        FRONT = 4,
        BACK = 5
    }

    pos = ((eye.X < minCorner.X ? 1 : 0) << (int) RelativePositioning.LEFT)
        + ((eye.X > maxCorner.X ? 1 : 0) << (int) RelativePositioning.RIGHT)
        + ((eye.Y < minCorner.Y ? 1 : 0) << (int) RelativePositioning.BOTTOM)
        + ((eye.Y > maxCorner.Y ? 1 : 0) << (int) RelativePositioning.TOP)
        + ((eye.Z < minCorner.Z ? 1 : 0) << (int) RelativePositioning.FRONT)
        + ((eye.Z > maxCorner.Z ? 1 : 0) << (int) RelativePositioning.BACK);

Or:

    enum RelativePositioning
    {
        LEFT = 1,
        RIGHT = 2,
        BOTTOM  = 4,
        TOP = 8,
        FRONT = 16,
        BACK = 32
    }

    if (eye.X < minCorner.X) { pos += (int) RelativePositioning.LEFT;   }
    if (eye.X > maxCorner.X) { pos += (int) RelativePositioning.RIGHT;  }
    if (eye.Y < minCorner.Y) { pos += (int) RelativePositioning.BOTTOM; }
    if (eye.Y > maxCorner.Y) { pos += (int) RelativePositioning.TOP;    }
    if (eye.Z > maxCorner.Z) { pos += (int) RelativePositioning.FRONT;  }
    if (eye.Z < minCorner.Z) { pos += (int) RelativePositioning.BACK;   }

I could have used something as ((eye.X > maxCorner.X) << 1) but C# does not allow implicit casting from bool to int and the ternary operator was similar enough. My question now is: is there any performance improvement in using the first version over the second?

Thank you
Tommaso

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8  
benchmark before performing micro-optimisations –  Mitch Wheat May 17 '10 at 8:19
4  
"We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil" Donald Knuth –  Cagdas May 17 '10 at 8:24
1  
Any reason you're not using an enum with the Flag attribute? –  Phil Gan May 17 '10 at 8:28
2  
@ Cagdas: I'm going to repeat this process for at least 10K times in a very short time (as short as possible) so I guess that any small optimization is ok. Moreover, I'm actually optimizing, this improvement is not premature, it is in working code. –  tunnuz May 17 '10 at 8:35
1  
As we're micro-optimizing, what about "|=" instead of "+=" in your second example (but profile!), and adding some "else"s (when x<min it's probably not also >max, so use an 'else if' there). –  Hans Kesting May 17 '10 at 8:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The inline if operator (?, :) will generate nearly the same IL as the standard if list in the second example. The only difference you will see here are the particular operations the processor will be doing, and I can bet that ADD is quicker than SHL.
Since you're going to be adding the results anyway, I would opt for the second example (plus it makes it far easier to read).

EDIT
I just checked the IL of both examples, and it goes against what I have said above.
The first example generates far less IL (34 lines less) so you'll have to run a performance test to really determine if it is faster too.

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+1 for the edit. –  Peter Radocchia Oct 3 '11 at 14:41

You should definitely use the Flags attribute for your enum. That way it would look something like that:

[Flags]
public enum RelativePositionings
{
    None = 0,
    Left = 1,
    Right = 2,
    Bottom  = 4,
    Top = 8,
    Front = 16,
    Back = 32
}

With this you can do such things like:

var position = RelativePositionings.Left | RelativePositionings.Front;

and check for each state by:

if(position.HasFlag(RelativePositioning.Left))
{
    //To do: if left bit is set?
}
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Significantly faster? no. Slightly faster? A little bit.

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