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Newbie question. How to calculate the value of the formula A f B, where f - the binary function OR or AND?

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1  
Do you mean boolean, or binary operation? –  Nick Craver May 17 '10 at 10:18
4  
Please start accepting answers. –  ThiefMaster Feb 15 '11 at 9:45
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8 Answers 8

There is a distinction between the conditional operators && and || and the boolean operators & and |. Mainly it is a difference of precendence (which operators get evaluated first) and also the && and || are 'escaping'. This means that is a sequence such as...

cond1 && cond2 && cond3

If cond1 is false, neither cond2 or cond3 are evaluated as the code rightly assumes that no matter what their value, the expression cannot be true. Likewise...

cond1 || cond2 || cond3

If cond1 is true, neither cond2 or cond3 are evaluated as the expression must be true no matter what their value is.

The bitwise counterparts, & and | are not escaping.

Hope that helps.

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I think you mean the bitwise counterparts, not the boolean counterparts. –  ThiefMaster May 17 '10 at 12:58
    
Thanks! You are right. –  Martin Randall Jun 23 '11 at 8:26
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Logical OR is ||, logical AND is &&. If you need the negation NOT, prefix your expression with !.

Example:

X = (A && B) || C || !D;

Then X will be true when either A and B are true or if C is true or if D is not true (i.e. false).

If you wanted bit-wise AND/OR/NOT, you would use &, | and ~. But if you are dealing with boolean/truth values, you do not want to use those. They do not provide short-circuit evaluation for example due to the way a bitwise operation works.

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if(A == "haha" && B == "hihi") {
//hahahihi?
}

if(A == "haha" || B != "hihi") {
//hahahihi!?
}
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I'm not sure if this answers your question, but for example:

if (A || B)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Or");
}

if (A && B)
{
    Console.WriteLine("And");
}
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Your example would never reach the && evaluation unless A && B are false, in which case it would never pass the 2nd statement. –  James May 17 '10 at 10:20
    
@James - That's not true unless Console.WriteLine() does a thread abort I don't know about? :) –  Nick Craver May 17 '10 at 10:22
1  
LOL @James... perhaps he thought it was an if/else or something. –  Lirik May 17 '10 at 10:26
    
If A or B is true and the other is false the console output would be "Or". If A and B are true, the console output would be "Or", "And". Otherwise nothing. Not sure what the talk about thread abort is all about...?! –  Martin Randall May 17 '10 at 10:27
    
The answer was edited it was an if/else. –  James May 17 '10 at 10:39
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Use '&&' for AND and use '||' for OR, for example:

bool A;
bool B;

bool resultOfAnd = A && B; // Returns the result of an AND
bool resultOfOr = A || B; // Returns the result of an OR
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If what interests you is bitwise operations look here for a brief tutorial : http://weblogs.asp.net/alessandro/archive/2007/10/02/bitwise-operators-in-c-or-xor-and-amp-amp-not.aspx .bitwise operation perform the same operations like the ones exemplified above they just work with binary representation (the operation applies to each individual bit of the value)

If you want logical operation answers are already given.

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many answers above, i will try a different way:

if you are looking for bitwise operations use only one of the marks like:

3 & 1 //==1 - and 4 | 1 //==5 - or

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&& it's operation return true only if both operand it's true which implies

bool and(bool b1, bool b2)]
{
 if(b1==true)
 {
   if(b2==true)
    return true;
 }
 return false;
}

|| it's operation return true if one or both operand it's true which implies

bool or(bool b1,bool b2)
{
 if(b1==true)
 return true;
 if(b2==true)
 return true;
 return false;
}

if You write

y=45&&34//45 binary 101101, 35 binary 100010

in result you have

y=32// in binary 100000

Therefore, the which I wrote above is used with respect to every pair of bits

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Your last paragraph is incorrect. That would be true for bitwise and (&) but certainly not for boolean and. –  ThiefMaster Jun 25 '10 at 5:33
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