Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm on a beginner level course in prolog, doing a map colouring problem. Here's my code.

col(Colors,Map,Coloring) :-
    checkMap(Colors,Map,Coloring).
checkMap(Colors,[Country1:Country2],Coloring) :-
    goodColor(Country1:Country2,Coloring,Colors).
checkMap(Colors,[Country1:Country2|Rest],Coloring) :-
    goodColor(Country1:Country2,Coloring,Colors),
    checkMap(Colors,Rest,Coloring).
goodColor(Country1:Country2,Coloring,Colors) :-
    mem(Country1:Color1,Coloring),!,
    mem(Country2:Color2,Coloring),!,
    mem(Color1,Colors), mem(Color2,Colors),
    not(Color1=Color2).
mem(Var,[Var|_]).
mem(Var,[_|Rest]) :-
    mem(Var,Rest).

My output looks like this:

?- col([a,b,c],[1:2,1:3,2:3],X).
X = [1:a, 2:b, 3:c|_G332] ;
X = [1:a, 2:c, 3:b|_G332] ;
X = [1:b, 2:a, 3:c|_G332] ;
X = [1:b, 2:c, 3:a|_G332] ;
X = [1:c, 2:a, 3:b|_G332] ;
X = [1:c, 2:b, 3:a|_G332] ;
fail.

Anyone know how I can get rid of the trailing variable? I know it's mostly cosmetic, but I don't see why it's there.

share|improve this question

Using an incomplete data structure is a valid Prolog programming technique. If your intention is to use an incomplete data structure then one solution is:

ground_terms([H|T1],[H|T2]) :- ground(H), !, ground_terms(T1,T2).
ground_terms(_,[]).

and change col as follows:

col(Colors,Map,Coloring) :-
    checkMap(Colors,Map,Coloring1),
    ground_terms(Coloring1,Coloring).
share|improve this answer
    
What is the predicate ground/1 in there? Thanks for the answer :) – Pjotrovitz Nov 14 '08 at 9:03

The trailing variable is there because mem(Var,[Var|_]) binds the unbound Coloring variable to [Var|_].

One way to avoid it is to accumulate the map coloring e.g (very quick and extremely dirty):

col(Colors,Map,Coloring) :-
    check(Colors,Map,[],Coloring).

check(Colors,[],Coloring,Coloring).

check(Colors,[Country1:Country2 | T],[],L) :-
    member(Color1,Colors),
    member(Color2,Colors),
    Color1 \== Color2,
    check(Colors,T,[Country1:Color1,Country2:Color2],L).

check(Colors,[Country1:Country2 | T],Coloring,L) :-
    member(Country1:Color1,Coloring),
    member(Country2:Color2,Coloring),!,
    check(Colors,T,Coloring,L).

check(Colors,[Country1:Country2 | T],Coloring,L) :-
    member(Country1:Color1,Coloring),!,
    member(Color2,Colors),
    not(member(_:Color2,Coloring)),
    check(Colors,T,[Country2:Color2|Coloring],L).

check(Colors,[Country1:Country2 | T],Coloring,L) :-
    member(Country2:Color2,Coloring),!,
    member(Color1,Colors),
    not(member(_:Color1,Coloring)),
    check(Colors,T,[Country1:Color1|Coloring],L).

Its a much more 'procedural' approach than yours though :-(. There's probably a more elegant way...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.