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How can I set the y axis range of the second subplot to e.g. [0,1000] ? The FFT plot of my data (a column in a text file) results in a (inf.?) spike so that the actual data is not visible.

pylab.ylim([0,1000])

has no effect, unfortunately. This is the whole script:

# based on http://www.swharden.com/blog/2009-01-21-signal-filtering-with-python/
import numpy, scipy, pylab, random

xs = []
rawsignal = []
with open("test.dat", 'r') as f:
      for line in f:
            if line[0] != '#' and len(line) > 0:
                xs.append( int( line.split()[0] ) )
                rawsignal.append( int( line.split()[1] ) )

h, w = 3, 1
pylab.figure(figsize=(12,9))
pylab.subplots_adjust(hspace=.7)

pylab.subplot(h,w,1)
pylab.title("Signal")
pylab.plot(xs,rawsignal)

pylab.subplot(h,w,2)
pylab.title("FFT")
fft = scipy.fft(rawsignal)
#~ pylab.axis([None,None,0,1000])
pylab.ylim([0,1000])
pylab.plot(abs(fft))

pylab.savefig("SIG.png",dpi=200)
pylab.show()

Other improvements are also appreciated!

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3 Answers 3

As found in http://programming.itags.org/matlab/33874/

 pylab.ylim([0,1000])

has to be executed after the plot!

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21  
If your answer fixes your problem, accept it. :) –  Andrea Spadaccini Feb 8 '11 at 8:20
1  
Whenever I do this, it flips the images upside down. –  EMS Dec 6 '11 at 1:52
1  
if i use this with hexbin, uses ylim after plot() exposes white background on both plots –  lynxoid Jun 19 '13 at 19:23
1  
WHat if you are not using plot, but savefig?? –  Ben Dec 21 '13 at 4:39

Using axes objects is a great approach for this. It helps if you want to interact with multiple figures and sub-plots. To add and manipulate the axes objects directly:

fig = pylab.figure(figsize=(12,9))

signal_axes = fig.add_subplot(211)
signal_axes.plot(xs,rawsignal)

fft_axes = fig.add_subplot(212)
fft_axes.set_title("FFT")
fft_axes.set_autoscaley_on(False)
fft_axes.set_ylim([0,1000])
fft = scipy.fft(rawsignal)
fft_axes.plot(abs(fft))

pylab.show()
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Sometimes you really want to set the axes limits before you plot the data. In that case, you can set the "autoscaling" feature of the Axes or AxesSubplot object. The functions of interest are set_autoscale_on, set_autoscalex_on, and set_autoscaley_on.

In your case, you want to freeze the y axis' limits, but allow the x axis to expand to accommodate your data. Therefore, you want to change the autoscaley_on property to False. Here is a modified version of the FFT subplot snippet from your code:

fft_axes = pylab.subplot(h,w,2)
pylab.title("FFT")
fft = scipy.fft(rawsignal)
pylab.ylim([0,1000])
fft_axes.set_autoscaley_on(False)
pylab.plot(abs(fft))
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