Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Firstly I'm extending an existing class structure and cannot alter the original, with that caveat:

I would like to do this:

class a
{
   int val;

   ... // usual constructor, etc...

   public int displayAlteredValue(int inp)
   {
     return (val*inp);
   }
}

class b extends a
{
   ... // usual constructor, etc...

   public in displayAlteredValue(int inp1, int inp2)
   {
     return (val*inp1*inp2);
   }
}

As I said before I cannot alter class a and I want to maintain the function name displayAlteredValue rather than making a new function. If this can be done I only have to change a few instantiations of a to instantiations of b. I don't want to spend a lot of time replacing the many function calls to displayAlteredValue. (And yes I do realise there are such things as search and replace however for other reasons, doing that would be problematic).

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
I don't really see the problem; there's nothing stopping you from adding another method to a subclass. Are you trying to get callers of the existing displayAlteredValue(int) method to magically start using your new displayAlteredValue(int,int) method? Where is the value for the additional parameter? –  erickson Nov 12 '08 at 20:46
    
If you want the callers to start magically using the new method, you'd have to modify all the callsites to provide the 2nd parameter anyhow, which I believe you claim you're asking this to avoid. I'm confused by the question. –  Greg D Nov 12 '08 at 20:49
    
It looks like you're trying to prevent the users from calling the old method. The only way to do that is to make the method return something useless when they do call it by overriding it. –  Elie Nov 12 '08 at 20:57

7 Answers 7

You can overload a function in a derived class. So what you have specified above should work. Just wrote a quick test and it worked.

public class DerivedOverload {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
    	A classA = new A(); 

    	B classB = new B();

    	System.out.println("DerivedOverload.main() classA.displayAlteredValue(2) : " + classA.displayAlteredValue(2));

    	System.out.println("DerivedOverload.main() classA.displayAlteredValue(2) : " + classB.displayAlteredValue(2,2));
    }



}


class A
{
   int val = 2;

   A(){

   }

   public int displayAlteredValue(int inp)
   {
     return (val*inp);
   }
}

class B extends A
{
   B(){

   }

   public int displayAlteredValue(int inp1, int inp2)
   {
     return (val*inp1*inp2);
   }
}

System out. DerivedOverload.main() classA.displayAlteredValue(2) : 4 DerivedOverload.main() classA.displayAlteredValue(2) : 8

share|improve this answer

I'm not clear what the issue is. You absolutely can create a subclass b which has a method of the same name but different signature.

One possible issue you might be running into is that the compiler needs to know that the type of the object is b, not a, in order to call the method that only exists in b.

So code like this won't work:

// this works because b is a subclass of a
a anObject = new b();

// this will not compile because the declared type of an Object is a
int x = anObject.getValue( 1, 2 );

You would have to either change the declaration of the variable to type b, or cast it to b whenever you want to call the 2-argument method.

share|improve this answer

what if you add this to your derived class

public int displayAlteredValue(int inp)
{
  return super.displayAlteredValue(inp);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why bother? By deriving the class, any calls to displayAlteredValue already do this. –  erickson Nov 12 '08 at 20:43
    
No they don't. Look up the difference between method overloading and method hiding. –  DJClayworth Nov 12 '08 at 21:45
    
I'm talking about calls with this signature, not calls to the overloaded method. This answer is recommending an override of A's definition, not an overload, which simply invokes A's definition, and is pointless. –  erickson Nov 13 '08 at 5:22

The code you've written compiles as-is. You've basically just overloaded the method. What does the code you posted not accomplish, that you want to accomplish? Are you trying to stop people from calling b.displayAlteredValue with a single argument? If so, you can't do that (at compile time) as it would violate Liskov's Substitutability Principle.

You could throw an exception, but that wouldn't be terribly nice.

Alternatively, you could use composition instead of inheritance - but really we'd need to know more about the situation to know whether that was suitable.

share|improve this answer

What you have looks fine to me.

Instances of class b will have access to both versions of the method. Calls to the 1-argument version will be automatically routed to class a. Calls to the 2-arg version will go to class b.

Instances of class a will only have access to the 1-arg version though, but I don't think there's a way around that.

share|improve this answer

Alternatively, you could consider favoring composition over inheritance since the class you are extending comes from a different package.

http://www.artima.com/lejava/articles/designprinciples4.html

share|improve this answer

You could write the code in class B as follows:

public int displayAlteredValue(int inp) 
{
    return -1;
}

and indicate on the function that -1 is an error return. For int this doesn't really work, but if you returned a class, you could return null if they call the single parameter version of the method.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.