Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a file like this:

01 00 01 14 c0 00 01 10 01 00 00 16 00 00 00 64
00 00 00 65 00 00 01 07 40 00 00 22 68 61 6c 2e
6f 70 65 6e 65 74 2e 63 6f 6d 3b 30 30 30 30 30
30 30 30 32 3b 30 00 00 00 00 01 08 40 00 00 1e
68 61 6c 2e 6f 70 65 6e 65 74 2d 74 65 6c 65 63
6f 6d 2e 6c 61 6e 00 00 00 00 01 28 40 00 00 21
72 65 61 6c 6d 31 2e 6f 70 65 6e 65 74 2d 74 65
6c 65 63 6f 6d 2e 6c 61 6e 00 00 00 00 00 01 25
40 00 00 1e 68 61 6c 2e 6f 70 65 6e 65 74 2d 74
65 6c 65 63 6f 6d 2e 6c 61 6e 00 00 00 00 01 1b
40 00 00 20 72 65 61 6c 6d 2e 6f 70 65 6e 65 74
2d 74 65 6c 65 63 6f 6d 2e 6c 61 6e 00 00 01 02
40 00 00 0c 01 00 00 16 00 00 01 a0 40 00 00 0c
00 00 00 01 00 00 01 9f 40 00 00 0c 00 00 00 00
00 00 01 16 40 00 00 0c 00 00 00 00 00 00 01 bb
40 00 00 28 00 00 01 c2 40 00 00 0c 00 00 00 00
00 00 01 bc 40 00 00 13 31 39 37 37 31 31 31 32
32 33 31 00

I am reading the file and then finding certain octets and replacing them with tags:

while(<FH>){
    $line =~ s/(00 00 00 64)/<incr4>    /g;
    $line =~ s/(00 00 00 65)/<incr4>    /g;
    $line =~ s/(30 30 30 30 30 32)/<incr6ascii:999999:0>/g;
    $line =~ s/(31 31 32 32 33 31)/<incr6ascii:999999:0>/g;
    print OUTPUT $line;
}

So for example, 00 00 00 64 would be replaced by the <incr4> tag. This was working fine, but it doesn't seem to able to match over multiple lines any more. For example the pattern 31 31 32 32 33 31 runs over multiple lines, and the regular expression doesn't seem to catch it. I tried using /m /s pattern modifiers to ignore new lines but they didn't match it either. The only way around it I can come up with, is to read the whole file into a string using:

undef $/;
my $whole_file = <FH>;
my $line = $whole_file;
$line =~ s/(00 00 00 64)/<incr4>    /g;
$line =~ s/(00 00 00 65)/<incr4>    /g;
$line =~ s/(30 30 30 30 30 32)/<incr6ascii:999999:0>/g;
$line =~ s/(31 31 32 32 33 31)/<incr6ascii:999999:0>/g;
print OUTPUT $line;

This works, the tags get inserted correctly, but the structure of the file is radically altered. It is all dumped out on a single line. I would like to retain the structure of the file as it appears here. Any ideas as to how I might do this?

/john

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The trick here is to match the class of all space like characters \s:

my $file = do {local (@ARGV, $/) = 'filename.txt'; <>}; # slurp file

my %tr = (  # setup a translation table
    '00 00 00 64'       => '<incr4>',
    '00 00 00 65'       => '<incr4>',
    '00 30 30 30 30 32' => '<incr6ascii:999999:0>',
    '31 31 32 32 33 31' => '<incr6ascii:999999:0>',
);

for (keys %tr) {
    my $re = join '\s+' => split;  # construct new regex

    $file =~ s{($re)}{
       $1 =~ /\n/ ? "\n$tr{$_}" : $tr{$_}  # if octets contained \n, add \n
    }ge  # match multiple times, execute the replacement block as perl code
}
print $file;
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent! Works perfectly... I never thought of using a hash map, ingenious solution! – John May 17 '10 at 21:32
1  
+1 : Great solution, just put the /x modifier in at the end though! – Zaid May 18 '10 at 10:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.