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Why is mandatory to use -ffast-math with g++ to achieve vectorization of loops using doubles? I don't like -ffast-math because I don't want to lose precision.

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-ffast-math is actually a combination flag which sets a set of other flags which can be enabled individually instead - perhaps you might be able to get away with only setting one or two of the individual flags instead? – Amber May 17 '10 at 20:59
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I tried, but only with --fast-math I get the maximum number of vectorized loops – Ruggero Turra May 17 '10 at 21:03
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You don’t necessarily lose precision with -ffast-math. It only affects the handling of NaN, Inf etc. and the order in which operations are performed.

If you have a specific piece of code where you do not want GCC to reorder or simplify computations, you can mark variables as being used using an asm statement.

For instance, the following code performs a rounding operation on f. However, the two f += g and f -= g operations are likely to get optimised away by gcc:

static double moo(double f, double g)                                      
{                                                                          
    g *= 4503599627370496.0; // 2 ** 52                                    
    f += g;                                                                
    f -= g;                                                                
    return f;                                                            
}                                                                     

On x86_64, you can use this asm statement to instruct GCC not to perform that optimisation:

static double moo(double f, double g)                                      
{                                                                          
    g *= 4503599627370496.0; // 2 ** 52                                    
    f += g;                                                                
    __asm__("" : "+x" (f));
    f -= g;
    return f;
}

You will need to adapt this for each architecture, unfortunately. On PowerPC, use +f instead of +x.

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Very likely because vectorization means that you may have different results, or may mean that you miss floating point signals/exceptions.

If you're compiling for 32 bit x86 then gcc and g++ default to using the x87 for floating point math, on 64 bit they default to sse, however the x87 can and will produce different values for the same computation so it's unlikely g++ will consider vectorizing if it can't guarantee that you will get the same results unless you use -ffast-math or some of the flags it turns on.

Basically it comes down to the floating point environment for vectorized code may not be the same as the one for non vectorized code, sometimes in ways that are important, if the differences don't matter to you, something like

-fno-math-errno -fno-trapping-math -fno-signaling-nans -fno-rounding-math

but first look up those options and make sure that they won't affect your program's correctness. -ffinite-math-only may help also

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