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Can somebody point me to good intruductions into OOP main paradigms, like inheritance, polymorphism, encapsulation? I am looking for short article, about 2-3 pages, for very quick reading.

Thank you very much.

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In`cap`su`la´tion n. 1. (Physiol.) The process of becoming, or the state or condition of being, incapsulated; as, incapsulation of the ovum in the uterus. –  Pete Kirkham May 17 '10 at 21:10
    
@Pete Kirkham: Umm... maybe " En capsulation"... –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner May 17 '10 at 21:11
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The Java Tutorial site covers this subject very well. About one page per each of the core concepts of OOP. java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/java/concepts/index.html –  ubiquibacon May 17 '10 at 21:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Just google for it http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object-oriented_programming

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-1: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/8724/…, meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5280/embrace-the-non-googlers ; I agree this is an easily Google-able topic, but that shouldn't dissuade users from providing a legitimate answer. –  Rob Hruska May 17 '10 at 21:57

The definitions from Alan Kay (he invented the term) on c2.com:

http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?AlanKaysDefinitionOfObjectOriented

http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?AlanKayOnMessaging

Which might not be the object-oriented you're looking for.

The big idea is "messaging" - that is what the kernel ... is all about ... The Japanese have a small word - ma - for "that which is in between" - perhaps the nearest English equivalent is "interstitial". The key in making great and growable systems is much more to design how its modules communicate rather than what their internal properties and behaviors should be.

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A very quickly reading cannot introduce you to the OOP paradigm. It's a very large topic and it's better that you study it with attention because it can determine how your code is structured.
I also suggest you to improve your knowledge of design patterns, when you'll correctly understand OOP.

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This is hardly a niche topic. For a C#-angle on it take a look at MSDN's documentation: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173109%28v=VS.80%29.aspx

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Take a look a the Simple English wiki article on OOP.

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This is for Java but works for any language: http://www.aonaware.com/OOP1.htm

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