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I have a function to convert documents into different formats, which then calls another function based on the type document. It's pretty straight forward for everything aside from HTML documents which require a bit of cleaning up, and that cleaning up is different based on where it's come from. So I had the idea that I could pass a reference to a subroutine to the convert function so the caller has the opportunity to modify the HTML, kinda like so (I'm not at work so this isn't copy-and-pasted):

package Converter;
...
sub convert
{
    my ($self, $filename, $coderef) = @_;

    if ($filename =~ /html?$/i) {
        $self->_convert_html($filename, $coderef);
    }
}

sub _convert_html
{
    my ($self, $filename, $coderef) = @_;

    my $html = $self->slurp($filename);
    $coderef->(\$html); #this modifies the html
    $self->save_to_file($filename, $html);
}

which is then called by:

Converter->new->convert("./whatever.html", sub { s/<html>/<xml>/i });

I've tried a couple of different things along these lines but I keep on getting 'Use of uninitialized value in substitution (s///)'. Is there any way of doing what I'm trying to do?

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Before you read any of the answers below: you might want to try adding some print statements at each subroutine level, to see if what you're getting as arguments really matches what you think you should be getting. Hint: the print statement inside the substitution coderef should lead you to the answer. –  Ether May 17 '10 at 23:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If it were me, I would avoid modifying the scalar ref and just return the changed value:

sub _convert_html
{
    my ($self, $filename, $coderef) = @_;

    my $html = $self->slurp($filename);
    $html = $coderef->( $html ); #this modifies the html
    $self->save_to_file($filename, $html);
}

However, if you want to modify a sub's arguments, it is worth knowing that all sub arguments are pass-by-reference in Perl (the elements of @_ are aliased to the arguments of the sub call). So your conversion sub can look like:

sub { $_[0] =~ s/<html>/<xml>/ }

But if you really want to operate on $_, like you have in your desired code example, you need to make _convert_html() look like:

sub _convert_html
{
    my ($self, $filename, $coderef) = @_;

    my $html = $self->slurp($filename);

    $coderef->() for $html;

    $self->save_to_file($filename, $html);
}

The for is an easy way to properly localize $_. You can also do:

sub _convert_html
{
    my ($self, $filename, $coderef) = @_;

    local $_ = $self->slurp($filename);

    $coderef->();

    $self->save_to_file($filename, $_);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the detailed explanation :-) –  Mark May 18 '10 at 0:20
2  
That's a lot of copying: first onto the argument stack, then change it, and copy it back onto the argument stack. That can hurt if you have to process many, many pages. –  brian d foy May 18 '10 at 0:32
1  
note that if speed is important, local is faster than for with one item –  Eric Strom May 18 '10 at 1:17
    
note that if you notice the difference in speed between local and for, you are doing something else wrong. –  jrockway May 18 '10 at 1:45
1  
Also, Sub::AliasedUnderscore is a cleaner way than either local or for. –  jrockway May 18 '10 at 1:46

Remember that an s/// by itself operates on $_, but your scalar reference is being passed into your callback sub as an argument, and is therefore in the @_ array.

So you can just change your callback sub to something like this:

sub { my ( $ref ) = @_; $$ref =~ s/<html>/<xml>/i }

Or, you could take advantage of the aliased nature of Perl subroutine arguments, and modify it directly:

sub _convert_html { 
    ...
    $coderef->( $html );
}

and then

sub { $_[0] =~ s/<html>/<xml>/i }

(This will actually modify the original string, as long as the argument is a scalar variable and not a literal string.)

share|improve this answer

Try this:

Converter->new->convert("./whatever.html", sub { ${$_[0]} =~ s/<html>/<xml>/i; });

You are getting an uninitialized value warning because the substitution isn't being given anything to operate on ($_ is undefined in its scope). You need to tell it where to find its value (in @_, as a reference).

If you want to be fancy you could make the coderef operate on all its args by default:

sub { map { $$_ =~ s/<html>/<xml>/i } @_ }
share|improve this answer
    
For the map code example, I'm wondering what I'd want the return value to be. :) –  brian d foy May 18 '10 at 0:30
    
@brian: indeed; normally I'd write a conversion sub to return the new value(s), rather than use references. –  Ether May 18 '10 at 16:17

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