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I am converting from JSON to object and from object to array. It does not what I expected, can you explain to me?

$json = '{"0" : "a"}';
$obj = json_decode($json);
$a = (array) $obj;
print_r($a);
echo("a0:".$a["0"]."<br>");

$b = array("0" => "b");
print_r($b);
echo("b0:".$b["0"]."<br>");

The output here is:

Array ( [0] => a ) a0:
Array ( [0] => b ) b0:b

I would have expected a0:a at the end of the first line.

Edit: After reading the answers I extended the code, which makes the behaviour more clear:

//extended example
$json = '{"0" : "a"}';
$obj = json_decode($json);
$a = (array) $obj;
var_export($a);
echo("a0:".$a["0"]."<br>"); //this line does not work, see the answers
echo $obj->{"0"}."<br>";  //works!

$json = '{"x" : "b"}';
$obj = json_decode($json);
$b = (array) $obj;
var_export($b);
echo("bx:".$b["x"]."<br>");

$c = array("1" => "c");
var_export($c);
echo("c1:".$c["1"]."<br>");

$d = array("0" => "d");
var_export($d);
echo("d0:".$d["0"]."<br>");

Output of extended example:

array ( '0' => 'a', )a0:
a
array ( 'x' => 'b', )bx:b
array ( 1 => 'c', )c1:c
array ( 0 => 'd', )d0:d 
share|improve this question
    
it's unbelievable but that's what php does %) a bug? –  zerkms May 17 '10 at 23:31
    
zerkms: I am glad you can confirm the behaviour. After using it for a while I do not php expect to be perfect. This is not its primary strength. But maybe we can understand what happens. OP karlthorwald - aka –  user89021 May 17 '10 at 23:51
    
@karlthorwald: This is very strange, I assume this is bug of some sort. Try submitting it via PHP.net. –  Alix Axel May 17 '10 at 23:52
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There's more information in this older question. The short version is that properties on PHP objects/classes follow the same naming convention as variables. A numerical property is invalid on a PHP object, so there's no clear rule as to what should happen when serializing an object from another language (json/javascript) that has a numerical key. While it seems obvious to you what should happen with the above, someone with a different bias sees PHP's behavior in this instance as perfectly valid and preferred.

So, it's kind of a bug, but more an undefined area of the spec with no clear answer, so don't expect the behavior to change to meet your liking, and if it does change, don't expect that change to be permanent.

To address some of the issues in the comments, consider this

header('Content-Type: text/plain');
$json = '{"0" : "a"}';
$obj = json_decode($json);
$a = (array) $obj;
var_dump($a);
var_dump(array(0=>'a'));
var_dump(array('0'=>'a'));

that will output something like this

array(1) {
  ["0"]=>
  string(1) "a"
}
array(1) {
  [0]=>
  string(1) "a"
}
array(1) {
  [0]=>
  string(1) "a"
}

An array with a single string key zero isn't a valid PHP construct. If you try to create one PHP will turn the zero into an int for you. When you ask PHP to do a cast it doesn't have a definition for, it ends up creating an array with a string key (because of the ill defined rules around what should happen here).

While it's blatantly obvious that this is "wrong" behavior on the part of PHP, defining the right behavior in a language that's weakly typed isn't easy.

share|improve this answer
    
Still, if you print_r() the $a after it has been casted as an array you can clearly see that the index 0 hasn't been dropped. –  Alix Axel May 17 '10 at 23:51
1  
yep. agreed with @Alix. the explanation in stackoverflow.com/questions/1869812/… works for objects. but due to we explicitly casted object to array we expect that it will work in regular way. even if new array wouldn't contain that "malformed key" - it also can be explained (because of malformed property of object). but semi-functional array looks very buggy. –  zerkms May 17 '10 at 23:54
1  
Updated question to address other the comments. In the case of $a you're casting an already invalid object as an array, so you're entering undefined behavior territory and all bets are off. In the case of $b PHP automatically casts the "0" as an int to produce a valid array. I agree it's weird behavior, but you end up with similar weird behaviors in any language that eschews strong typing. –  Alan Storm May 18 '10 at 0:04
    
yep, the last update with string vs integer keys comparison clarifies this php behavior. thanks. –  zerkms May 18 '10 at 0:07
    
Might be worth adding the obvious fix: json_decode($json, true). –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 17 '11 at 16:40
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You can just access it as an object (stdClass) rather than an array:

$json = '{"0" : "a"}';
$obj = json_decode($json);
print_r($obj);
echo("a0:".$obj->{"0"}."<br>");

This is the most straightforward since your JavaScript was an object ({}) rather than an array [] to begin with.

Alternatively, you can do this

$arr = json_decode($json, true);

The second optional parameter makes it output an associative array. http://us.php.net/json_decode

share|improve this answer
    
you missed 3rd line, where the object was converted to an array. your answer doesn't explain why do we can see the item in var_dump() but cannot access it. the general question is about object->array conversion and not about how to work with json_decode –  zerkms May 17 '10 at 23:33
    
philfreo thank you. this helps me go on with my coding. but I well keep the question open now and maybe someone explains the unexpected behaviour that I found. OP karlthorwald - aka –  user89021 May 17 '10 at 23:54
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Why are you doing this? Do you know you can have the JSON decoded values as an array directly?

$arr = json_decode($json, true);

echo '<pre>';
print_r($arr);
echo '</pre>';
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't justify the results anyway ;-) Does it? –  zerkms May 17 '10 at 23:42
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Array ( [0] => a ) a0:
Array ( [0] => b ) b0:b

PHP's unhelpful print_r attacks again!

The first array has an integer key 0, because the (array) cast tries to turn it into a flat list-like array.

The second array retains the associative-array-style string key '0' you constructed it with.

Use var_export instead of print_r and you can see the difference more easily.

share|improve this answer
    
var_dump, actually –  zerkms May 18 '10 at 0:08
    
It helps a lot to know that print_r does not work well. Still var_export shows a string key (see extended example in the question) –  user89021 May 18 '10 at 0:23
    
@zerkms: var_export, actually –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 17 '11 at 16:38
    
@user89021: Alan Storm's answer correctly identifies the issue. The intermediate step of your data existing as an object has the problem of a property being named 0, which is not valid. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 17 '11 at 16:39
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Well, the problem only exists when the initial object has properties that are not allowed [aka properties that are numerical]. This is not related to json_encode/decode, but to any operation involving converting from objects into array. All the integer keys will be rendered inaccessible.

http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.types.array.php - where it is pointed that : If an object is converted to an array, the result is an array whose elements are the object's properties. The keys are the member variable names, with a few notable exceptions: integer properties are unaccessible; private variables have the class name prepended to the variable name; protected variables have a '*' prepended to the variable name. These prepended values have null bytes on either side.

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