Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What I understand about RSA is that Alice can create a public and a private key combination, and then send the public key over to Bob. And then afterward Bob can encrypt something using the public key and Alice will use the public and private key combo to decrypt it.

However, how can Alice encrypt something to be sent over to Bob? How would Bob decrypt it? I ask because I'm curious how when I log onto my banking site, my bank sends me data such as my online statements. How does my browser decrypt that information? I don't have the private key.

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Simple, you need a key.

SSL/TLS solves this problem by creating a symmetric session key during the connection setup. The public key cryptography is used to establish this session key, which is then used for bi-directional data communication. Read more about TLS

share|improve this answer

Alice will use the public and private key combo to decrypt it

Alice would just decrypt it with her private key.

However, how can Alice encrypt something to be sent over to Bob? How would Bob decrypt it?

Alice would need Bob's public key to send something to him. Typically, public key encryption is used for authentication, non-repudiation (like signing), and distribution of symmetric keys (which are faster for encrypting/ decrypting long messages).

share|improve this answer

In this situation, Alice would use Bob's public key to encrypt the data and Bob would then decrypt it with his private key.

Essentially, a public key encrypts data and a private key decrypts that data. Since every user has both a public and private key, you can securely send data to any other user.

share|improve this answer

However, how can Alice encrypt something to be sent over to Bob? How would Bob decrypt it? I ask because I'm curious how when I log onto my banking site, my bank sends me data such as my online statements. How does my browser decrypt that information? I don't have the private key.

This is where you're wrong; you do have a private key. As part of the handshaking process, each side generates two keys: a public key and a private key. The client sends its public key to the server, who will use it to encrypt all data sent to the client. Likewise, the server generates both keys and sends its public key to the client, which will use it to encrypt all data sent to the server.

In many scenarios, the asymmetric key algorithm is used only to exchange another key, which is for a symmetric algorithm.

share|improve this answer

Basically, the procedure is:

  1. The client connects to the server and asks for the server's certificate. The certificate contains the public key and information about the server's identity.
  2. Assuming the client is happy with the server's identity, it generates a random number P and encrypts it with the server's public key.
  3. Only the server can decrypt P (with it's private key - not shared with anybody) so when the client sends the encrypted random number to the server, the server decrypts it.
  4. The client and server both use P to generate a symmetric key for use in a symmetric encryption algorithm, safe in the knowledge that only the client and server know the value of P used to generate the key.
share|improve this answer

If you connect to the site of your bank it works a lot of cryptographic things. The most important is that you use public key of the bank to send a piece of information to the bank, because in every SSL (https) connection server send to client it's public key packed as a certificate.

Usage of certificate and world wide PKI is important. You want be sure, that if you gives to the bank your bank pin, that on the other side is really your bank and not an other person. This will be solved, because on every computers there are a small number of public keys of well known organisations (like VeriSign) and bank send you not only his server public key, but a certificate. certificate is a message signed by VeriSign for example, which say "this public key is really from the bank XYZ". So because you have public key of VeriSign you can first verify, that server certificate of the bank is correct. So you can be sure, that you communicate really with your bank.

share|improve this answer

I didn't create this, but someone shared this video with me and it helped the theory make much more sense. As always the devil's in the details (implementation).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEBfamv-_do

share|improve this answer

On a general note I struggled to understand Public Key Cryptography for quite a while along with the other elements of PKI such as Digital Signatures and Certificates whilst preparing for Microsoft C# certification.

I came across an explanation in the form of a concise and detailed PDF at cgi.com. I know it's back to good old Alice and Bob! but it really cleared things up for me with its diagrams and notes and also has some thought provoking questions at the end. Definitely recommend it.

Visit http://www.cgi.com/files/white-papers/cgi_whpr_35_pki_e.pdf

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.