Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Using boost::serialization, what's the "best" way to serialize an object that contains cached, derived values in mutable members?

class Example
{
public:
    Example(float n) : 
        num(n),
        sqrt_num(-1.0)
    {}

    // compute and cache sqrt on first read
    float get_sqrt() const
    { 
        if(sqrt_num < 0) 
            sqrt_num = sqrt(num);
        return sqrt_num;
    }

    template <class Archive> 
    void serialize(Archive& ar, unsigned int version)
    { ... }
private:
    float num;
    mutable float sqrt_num;
};

I'd like to avoid splitting serialize() into separate save() and load() methods, for maintenance reasons.

One suboptimal implementation of serialize:

    template <class Archive> 
    void serialize(Archive& ar, unsigned int version)
    {
        ar & num;
        sqrt_num = -1.0;
    }

This handles the deserialization case, but in the serialization case, the cached value is killed and must be recomputed.

What is the best practice in this case?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Splitting your saving and loading methods doesn't mean you have to maintain two copies of your serialization code. You can split them and then join them back again with a common function.

private:
  friend class boost::serialization::access;

  BOOST_SERIALIZATION_SPLIT_MEMBER()

  template <class Archive>
  void save(Archive& ar, const unsigned int version) const {
      const_cast<Example*>(this)->common_serialize(ar, version);
  }

  template <class Archive>
  void load(Archive& ar, const unsigned int version) {
      common_serialize(ar, version);
      sqrt_num = -1;
  }

  template <class Archive>
  void common_serialize(Archive& ar, const unsigned int version) {
      ar & num;
  }

You probably noticed the const_cast. That's an unfortunate caveat to this idea. Although the serialize member function is non-const for saving operations, the save member function needs to be const. As long as the object you're serializing wasn't originally declared const, though, it's safe to cast it away as shown above. The documentation briefly mentions the need to cast for const members; this is similar.

With the changes above, your code will correctly print "2" for both ex1 and ex2, and you only have to maintain one copy of the serialization code. The load code only contains code specific to re-initializing the object's internal cache; the save function doesn't touch the cache.

share|improve this answer
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can check the Archive::is_loading field, and load cached values if it's true.

template <class Archive> 
void serialize(Archive& ar, unsigned int version)
{
    ar & num;
    if(Archive::is_loading::value == true)
        sqrt_num = -1.0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
wow, answered 3.5 years after you asked the question! –  Sam Miller Oct 30 '13 at 21:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.