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When editing really long code blocks (which should definitely be refactored anyway, but that's beyond the scope of this question), I often long for the ability to collapse statement blocks like one can collapse function blocks. That is to say, it would be great if the minus icon appeared on the code outline for everything enclosed in braces. It seems to appear for functions, classes, regions, namespaces, usings, but not for conditional or iterative blocks. It would be fantastic if I could collapse things like ifs, switches, foreaches, that kind of thing!

Googling into that a bit, I discovered that apparently C++ outlining in VS allows this but C# outlining in VS does not. I don't really get why. Even notepad++ will so these collapses if I select the C# formatting, so I don't get why Visual Studio doesn't.

Does anyone know of a VS2008 add-in that will enable this behavior? Or some sort of hidden setting for it?

Edited to add: inserting regions is of course an option and it did already occur to me, but quite frankly, I shouldn't have to wrap things in a region that are already wrapped in braces... if I was going to edit the existing code, I would just refactor it to have better separation of concern anyway. ("wrapping" with new methods instead of regions ;)

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4  
BTW: I found that these two shortcuts made my life very easy: Toggle outline: Ctrl + M, M Collapse All: Ctrl + M, O –  Gaurav Jun 27 '09 at 7:42
2  
Ctrl + M, L toggles a recursive collapse/expand. Of course, this can leave you with a single line. Inside that line, though (Ctrl + M, M) leaves you with a nicely summarized file. –  patridge Mar 24 '10 at 14:37
    
I use these all the time... –  sliderhouserules Aug 5 '10 at 18:34
1  
thanks a lot for Ctrl M + M –  Ufuk Hacıoğulları Oct 25 '11 at 8:46
1  
Here's an equivalent plugin for VS 2012: stackoverflow.com/questions/18388280/… –  Glimpse Aug 23 '13 at 0:25

10 Answers 10

up vote 138 down vote accepted

Try C# outline plugin (@MSDN) (VS 2010 only) - "Adds all braces {} outlining for C# editor, not only class and its members, but also constructions inside."

Also, there is VS 2012 version of this tool: C# outline 2012 (@MSDN)

And also there is VS 2013 version: C# outline 2013 (@MSDN)

Note: If the extension doesn't seem to install after you used a browser to download it, try using the built-in Visual Studio extension manager.

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9  
this is an excellent plugin that does exactly what the question is asking for –  Amir Mar 24 '11 at 3:40
1  
awesome...thanks for sharing –  Umer Jul 6 '11 at 17:35
1  
This is "perfect". Thanks. –  mishal153 Jul 12 '11 at 10:45
2  
Exactly what I was looking for. Thanks. –  40-Love Jan 3 '12 at 15:45
2  
Ctrl M + O no longer works. How can I fix this? –  Odys Nov 12 '12 at 8:30

I'm not aware of add-ins, but you mentioned regions and I see nothing wrong with doing something like this...

foreach (Item i in Items)
{
  #region something big happening here
  ...
  #endregion

  #region something big happening here too
  ...
  #endregion

  #region something big happening here also
  ...
  #endregion
}

EDIT: In response to the question's EDIT: You're right, sticking a bunch of regions everywhere isn't ideal and refactoring is probably the way to go. But it seems that you're looking for something magical that will "organize" the code for you, and I don't think that exists.

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IIRC, you can't define regions within a function. –  Joel Coehoorn Nov 12 '08 at 21:24
7  
his code is correct; you are not limited to where you can define regions like this (as long as you aren't ending outside of scope of the beginning) –  John Nov 12 '08 at 21:26
    
@john is correct –  kenny Nov 12 '08 at 21:41
3  
Please see the edit of the original question; manual action required on the part of the developer (even using a one-or-two-click region-wrapping shortcut) doesn't really answer the question/desire for this to be done automatically –  Grank Nov 12 '08 at 21:50
1  
@Joel I believe you're thinking of VB.NET –  Bryan Anderson Nov 12 '08 at 22:34

You can collapse specific blocks of text within visual studio, but you have to turn off automatic outlining.

Right click in your code window and select (Outlining | Stop Outlining)

Then, select some text, right click and select (Outlining | Hide Selection)

When you turn on automatic outlining again, your custom "Regions" will no longer collapse.

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3  
Fair enough. I'm hoping to find through this question a way to add these blocks to the automatic outlining though, as it doesn't really make sense for them not to be. –  Grank Nov 12 '08 at 21:48
1  
Matt, you can do it (in VS 2012) without stopping automatic outlining. Just select text, and outline>hide selection –  nawfal May 8 '13 at 13:20

Visual Studio 2008 supports regions inside of functions as long as you keep them in the same code hierarchical level

#region Won't work
for(int i = 0; i<Count; i++)
{
//do something
#endregion
}

for(int i=0; i<Count; i++)
{
#region Works fine
//do lots of stuff
#endregion
}
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3  
This isn't new in 2008. 2005 supports it as well. –  Kon Nov 12 '08 at 21:47

This feature has been added to Visual Studio 2010's C# editor. I can't find the source verifying it was actually put in, but I remember seeing it on one of the Dev 10 team member blogs talking about changes since Beta 1 or something. As a consolation, here's one Microsoft comment suggesting they wanted to add it.

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I will add here that in VS 2010 Microsoft has added WPF adorner capabilities using Managed Extensibility Framework (MEF), this will allow us to extend the source code editor to organize them in a much better way to make it more readable and accessible.

For instance the Summary Comments visualizer that Scott Gu demoed at PDC 2008.

So look forward to a better tomorrow for developers :)

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# region ,#endregion is the smart option.

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6  
StyleCop rule SA1123: DoNotPlaceRegionsWithinElements: A violation of this rule occurs whenever a region is placed within the body of a code element. In many editors, including Visual Studio, the region will appear collapsed by default, hiding the code within the region. It is generally a bad practice to hide code within the body of an element, as this can lead to bad decisions as the code is maintained over time. –  280Z28 Jul 19 '09 at 20:17

Coderush will outline all code blocks for you. Not sure if it allows you to expand/collapse the blocks, but outlining is the next best thing. I use resharper instead of coderush which as far as I know doesn't provide block collapsing either :(

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I have found this for Visual Studio 2013 and found it very helpful. It works even if you put simple braces around your code with { ..... }

After sharing I found somebody else also mentioned this link. My vote is for this tool also.

C# Outlining Tool for Visual Studio 2013

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Let me say something different: press(ctrl+m,ctrlh) or in edit>outlining>hide selection its so useful.

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  vape Apr 11 at 7:48
    
can you tell me whats wrong with my answer ? –  Mahdi Apr 11 at 10:54
    
@Mahdi the question was about the tool that will collapse blocks of code. You click some combination and your ifs, for/while loops, etc are all collapsed so that you can read your code in the highest level possible. Then you would go deeper into the code. Your solution is not viable because you would have to first collapse all the regions and you don't see which region exactly is it. Good luck in the future. –  Roman May 14 at 13:55
    
you can first comment something then hide under this so it is more easy and flexible –  Mahdi May 23 at 21:07

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