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I'm trying to serialize using boost property tree write_json, it saves everything as strings, it's not that data are wrong, but I need to cast them explicitly every time and I want to use them somewhere else. (like in python or other C++ json (non boost) library)

here is some sample code and what I get depending on locale:

boost::property_tree::ptree root, arr, elem1, elem2;
elem1.put<int>("key0", 0);
elem1.put<bool>("key1", true);
elem2.put<float>("key2", 2.2f);
elem2.put<double>("key3", 3.3);
arr.push_back( std::make_pair("", elem1) );
arr.push_back( std::make_pair("", elem2) );
root.put_child("path1.path2", arr);

std::stringstream ss;
write_json(ss, root);
std::string my_string_to_send_somewhare_else = ss.str();

and my_string_to_send_somewhere_else is sth. like this:

{
    "path1" :
    {
       "path2" :
       [
            {
                 "key0" : "0",
                 "key1" : "true"
            },
            {
                 "key2" : "2.2",
                 "key3" : "3.3"
            }
       ]
    }
}

Is there anyway to save them as the values, like: "key1" : true or "key2" : 2.2?

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4 Answers 4

Ok, I've solved it like this, (of course it won't suite for everybody, as it is a bit of a hack, that need further work).


I've wrote my own write_json function (simply copied the files, json_parser.hpp and json_parser_write.hpp to my project) and modified the following lines in json_parser_write.hpp:

  1. commented line 37 - escaping the quote '"'
  2. changed line 76 - so that it doesn't add quotes anymore: stream << Ch('"') << data << Ch('"'); ==> stream << data;

Than values will be saved properly except for strings, so I wrote custom translator for it:

template <typename T>
struct my_id_translator
{
    typedef T internal_type;
    typedef T external_type;

    boost::optional<T> get_value(const T &v) { return  v.substr(1, v.size() - 2) ; }
    boost::optional<T> put_value(const T &v) { return '"' + v +'"'; }
};

and simply saved string using:

elem2.put<std::string>("key2", "asdf", my_id_translator<std::string>());

complete program:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>

#include <boost/property_tree/ptree.hpp>

#include "property_tree/json_parser.hpp" // copied the headers

template <typename T>

struct my_id_translator
{
    typedef T internal_type;
    typedef T external_type;

    boost::optional<T> get_value(const T &v) { return  v.substr(1, v.size() - 2) ; }
    boost::optional<T> put_value(const T &v) { return '"' + v +'"'; }
};

int main(int, char *[])
{
    using namespace std;
    using boost::property_tree::ptree;
    using boost::property_tree::basic_ptree;
    try
    {
        ptree root, arr,elem2;
        basic_ptree<std::string, std::string> elem1;
        elem1.put<int>("int", 10 );
        elem1.put<bool>("bool", true);
        elem2.put<double>("double", 2.2);
        elem2.put<std::string>("string", "some string", my_id_translator<std::string>());

        arr.push_back( std::make_pair("", elem1) );
        arr.push_back( std::make_pair("", elem2) );
        root.put_child("path1.path2", arr);

        std::stringstream ss;
        write_json(ss, root);
        std::string my_string_to_send_somewhere_else = ss.str();

        cout << my_string_to_send_somewhere_else << endl;

    }
    catch (std::exception & e)
    {
        cout << e.what();
    }
    return 0;
}

result :)

{
    "path1":
    {
        "path2":
        [
            {
                "int": 10,
                "bool": true
            },
            {
                "double": 2.2,
                "string": "some string"
            }
        ]
    }
}
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2  
+1 useful to know there is no clean solution right now, and that a kludge is necessary –  Rob Agar May 21 '13 at 16:58
    
If the double quote is not escaped then you might run with a problem if this quote happens to be in your string. –  Bogolt Dec 14 '13 at 11:14

From the outputted JSON it is clear that the serializer serializes everything to strings using some sort of .toString() method - that is, its unaware of the type of each member and so encloses everything in " ".

See http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2114466/creating-json-arrays-in-boost-using-property-trees for more about this problem .

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As we have typedef basic_ptree<std::string, std::string> ptree; in the boost libraries, boost will always serialize each value as string and parse all values to a string equivalent.

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Boost confirms its implementation has no 100% conformance to JSON standard. Check the following link to see their explanation: Making a ptree variant that preserves JSON types is a future plan, but far off.!

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