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I appears to me as though there is a bug/inconsistency in the C# compiler.

This works fine (first method gets called):

    public void SomeMethod(string message, object data);
    public void SomeMethod(string message, params object[] data);

    // ....
    SomeMethod("woohoo", item);

Yet this causes "The call is ambiguous between the following methods" error:

    public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, T data);
    public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, params T[] data);

    // ....
    SomeMethod("woohoo", (T)item);

I could just use the dump the first method entirely, but since this is a very performance sensitive library and the first method will be used about 75% of the time, I would rather not always wrap things in an array and instantiate an iterator to go over a foreach if there is only one item.

Splitting into different named methods would be messy at best IMO.

Thoughts?

EDIT:

I guess Andrew might be onto something.

Full example:

public static class StringStuffDoer
    {
        public static string ToString<T>(T item1, T item2)
        {
            return item2.ToString() + item1.ToString();
        }

        public static string ToString<T>(T item, params T[] items)
        {
            StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

            foreach (T currentItem in items)
            {
                builder.Append(currentItem.ToString());
            }

            return item.ToString() + builder.ToString();
        }

        public static void CallToString()
        {
            ToString("someString", null); // FAIL
            ToString("someString", "another string"); // SUCCESS
            ToString("someString", (string)null); // SUCCESS
        }
    }

I still think it is odd that the cast is needed - the call is not ambiguous. It works if you replace T with string or object or any non-generic type, so why wouldn't it work for the generic? It properly finds the two possible matching methods, so I believe that by the spec, it should pick the one that doesn't use params if possible. Correct me if I'm wrong here.

(NOT SO) FINAL UPDATE:

Sorry for taking you guys on this tyraid, I've apparently been staring at this too long...too much looking at generics and params for one night. The non-generic version throws the ambiguous error as well, I just had the method signature off in my mockup test.

REAL FINAL UPDATE:

Okay, this is why the problem didn't show up in my non-generic test. I was using "object" as the type parameters. SomeMethod(object) and SomeMethod(params object[]) do NOT throw the ambiguous error, I guess "null" automatically gets cast to "object". A bit strange I'd say, but somewhat understandable, maybe.

So, oddly enough, this call DOES work:

SomeMethod<object>("someMessage", null);
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2  
is item null? :s –  Andrew Bullock May 18 '10 at 9:40
6  
Please post a short but complete program demonstrating the problem, and tell us which version of C# you're using. –  Jon Skeet May 18 '10 at 9:43
    
How does it work if you do not cast item into T? If at some point before you had item declared as T type, does it work as you expect it? –  Francisco Soto May 18 '10 at 9:47
    
Note that a 'bug' would be variance between the actual behaviour and the specified behaviour. A difference between the actual behaviour and the expected behaviour would be a 'strangeness' or an 'unexpected result'. Have you checked the appropriate specification? –  AakashM May 18 '10 at 9:48
    
I just put the cast there to show you that item is type T in the second example. The cast doesn't make a difference. –  Mike M May 18 '10 at 9:50
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Seems to work for me, does the rest of your code look like the following?

class TestThing<T>
{
    public void SomeMethod(string message, T data)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("first");
    }
    public void SomeMethod(string message, params T[] data)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("second");
    }
}


class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var item = new object();
        var test_thing = new TestThing<object>();
        test_thing.SomeMethod("woohoo", item);
        test_thing.SomeMethod("woohoo", item, item);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Compiles fine on .NET 3.5 and outputs "first" and then "second" when run. Which version are you using/targeting?

EDIT

The issue from your code above is that the compiler can't tell what type null is. It is equally valid to assume that it is a string or an array of strings, hence why it is ambiguous when just null and not ambiguous when you specifically cast it (i.e. you're telling the compiler how it should be treated).

UPDATE

"The same can be argued for SomeMethod(string, string) and SomeMethod (string, params string[]), yet it works"

Actually, no it doesn't. You get the same ambiguous method problem.

public static string TypedToString(string item1, string item2)
{
  return "";
}

public static string TypedToString(string item1, params string[] items)
{
  return "";
}

public static void CallToString()
{
  TypedToString("someString", null); // FAIL
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, updated my post to reflect the problem. The behaviour is inconsistent when the params value is null without a cast. –  Mike M May 18 '10 at 10:12
    
The same can be argued for SomeMethod(string, string) and SomeMethod (string, params string[]), yet it works. –  Mike M May 18 '10 at 10:19
    
It is inferring the types properly, as it is picking up the two matching methods and saying "these both match." The problem is the inconsistency in failing to pick the non-params method in the generic case v.s. just picking the non-params method in the non-generic case. –  Mike M May 18 '10 at 10:25
    
Sorry - didn't spot in your example that the first parameter is also type T so it will infer string from the first argument. The null is still a problem though, see update above. –  Paolo May 18 '10 at 10:40
    
Sorry, updated my post and marked as answer...apparently I've been up too long... –  Mike M May 18 '10 at 10:56
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It appears to me as though there is a bug/inconsistency in the C# compiler.

There certainly are bugs and inconsistencies in the compiler. You have not found one of them. The compiler is behaving completely correctly and according to spec in all these cases.

I'm doing my best to make sense of this very confusing question. Let me try to break it down into a series of questions.

Why does this succeed and call the first method?

public void SomeMethod(string message, object data);
public void SomeMethod(string message, params object[] data);
// ....
SomeMethod("woohoo", item);

(Presumption: that item is an expression of a compile-time type other than object[].)

Overload resolution must choose between two applicable methods. The second method is only applicable in its expanded form. A method that is applicable only in its expanded form is automatically worse than a method applicable in its normal form. Therefore the remaining better method is chosen.

Why does this fail with an ambiguity error?

public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, T data);
public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, params T[] data);
// ...
SomeMethod("woohoo", (T)item);

It is impossible to say because you do not say what "T" is. Where does T come from in this example? There are two type parameters named T declared; is this code in the context of one of those methods? Since those are different types both named T it could make a difference. Or is this yet a third type called T?

Since the question does not have enough information to answer it, I'm going to ask a better question on your behalf.

Why does this fail with an ambiguity error?

public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, T data);
public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, params T[] data);
// ...
SomeMethod("woohoo", "hello");

It doesn't. It succeeds. Type inference chooses "string" for T in both methods. Both generic methods are applicable; the second is applicable in its expanded form, so it loses.

OK, then why does this fail with an ambiguity error?

public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, T data);
public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, params T[] data);
// ...
SomeMethod("woohoo", null);

It doesn't. It fails with a "cannot infer T" error. There's not enough information here to determine what T is in either case. Since type inference fails to find an candidate method, the candidate set is empty and overload resolution has nothing to choose between.

So this succeeds because... ?

public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, T data);
public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, params T[] data);
// ...
SomeMethod("woohoo", (string)null);

Type inference infers that both methods are candidates when constructed with "string". Again, the second method is worse because it is applicable only in its expanded form.

What if we take type inference out of the picture? Why is this ambiguous?

public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, T data);
public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, params T[] data);
// ...
SomeMethod<string>("woohoo", null);

We now have three applicable candidates. The first method, the second method in its normal form, and the second method in its expanded form. The expanded form is discarded because expanded is worse than normal. That leaves two methods in their normal form, one taking string and the other taking string[]. Which is better?

When faced with this choice we always choose the one with the more specific type. If you said

public void M(string s) { ... }
public void M(object s) { ... }
...
M(null);

we'd choose the string version because string is more specific than object. Every string is an object but not every object is a string.

string is not convertible to string[]. string[] is not convertible to string. Neither is more specific than the other. Therefore this is an ambiguity error; there are two "best" candidates.

Then why does this succeed and what does it do?

public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, T data);
public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, params T[] data);
// ...
SomeMethod<object>("woohoo", null);

Again we have three candidates, not two. We automatically eliminate the expanded form as before, leaving two. Of the two methods in normal form which remain, which is better?

We must determine which is more specific. Every object array is an object, but not every object is an object array. object[] is more specific than object, so we choose to call the version that takes an object[]. We pass a null parameter array, which is almost certainly not what you intended.

This is why it is an extremely poor programming practice to make overloads like you are doing. You introduce potential for your users to run into all kinds of crazy ambiguities when you do this kind of stuff. Please do not design methods like this.

A better way to design this sort of logic is: (Note that I have not actually compiled this code, this is just off the top of my head.)

static string ToString<T>(T t)
{
    return t == null ? "" : t.ToString();
}
static string ToString<T>(T t1, T t2)
{
    return ToString<T>(t1) + ToString<T>(t2);
}
static string ToString<T>(T t1, T t2, params T[] rest)
{
    string firstTwo = ToString<T>(t1, t2);
    if (rest == null) return firstTwo;
    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    sb.Append(firstTwo);
    foreach(T t in rest)
      sb.Append(ToString<T>(t));
    return sb.ToString();
}

Now every case is handled with reasonable semantics and decent efficiency. And for any given call site you can immediately predict precisely which method will be called; there are only three possibilites: one argument, two arguments or more than two arguments. Each is handled unambiguously by a particular method.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your very complete answer, however I was designing after a pattern I got from the .NET Framework itself - the string.Format overloads. string.Format(string, object) and string.Format(string, params object[]) are technically ambiguous when called as string.Format("format", null), but it takes the first one. I understand why now, but the source of my problems was wrongly thinking that behaviour also worked for other classes other than object. The only reason it works for object is that object[] can be implicitly cast to object, which obviously isn't the case for other types. –  Mike M May 19 '10 at 10:51
    
@Mike: Indeed, I wish Format had not been designed that way; I find it confusing. However, it's a reasonably small flaw in the grand scheme of things. –  Eric Lippert May 19 '10 at 13:51
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You should change the signatures to be more specific. Eg:

void Foo(object o1);
void Foo(object o1, object o2);
void Foo(object o1, object o2, object o3, params object[] rest);

Note the difference between the last 2. This solves the ambiguity problem (will work for generics too).

Update:

public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, T data);
public void SomeMethod<T>(string message, T data1, T data2, params T[] data);

Just 2 methods. No ambiguity.

share|improve this answer
    
I shouldn't have to write the additional method though. SomeMethod(string, string) and SomeMethod (string, params string[]) figure themselves out just fine. –  Mike M May 18 '10 at 10:21
    
You dont need the additional Foo method, it was just an example. You still have an ambiguous method call, what it will actually call, is implementation defined, and I would not bargain on any such behavior. –  leppie May 18 '10 at 10:23
    
I'm not sure what you are saying - the behaviour is well defined - if possible, pick the non-params method that matches. It does this in non-generics, even if I say SomeMethod("string", null), even though this is technically an ambiguous call. The inconsistency is the only problem here. –  Mike M May 18 '10 at 10:28
    
I guess your update works as a workaround, but it's still fairly crappy from an implementation perspective and I suppose I just dislike the inconsistent behaviour. –  Mike M May 18 '10 at 10:32
    
My bad, updated my post. –  Mike M May 18 '10 at 10:57
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I want to add this tidbit for anyone who comes across this to explain the ambiguity issue with SomeMethod(object) and SomeMethod(params object[]) that was throwing me of. This was dug up from the C# spec for me on the MSDN forums by Figo Fei:

10.6.1.4 Parameter arrays

A parameter declared with a params modifier is a parameter array.

When performing overload resolution, a method with a parameter array may be applicable either in its normal form or in its expanded form (§7.4.3.1). The expanded form of a method is available only if the normal form of the method is not applicable and only if a method with the same signature as the expanded form is not already declared in the same type.

When the type of a parameter array is object[], a potential ambiguity arises between the normal form of the method and the expended form for a single object parameter. The reason for the ambiguity is that an object[] is itself implicitly convertible to type object. The ambiguity presents no problem, however, since it can be resolved by inserting a cast if needed.

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