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i'd like to call a function using an array as a parameters:

var x = [ 'p0', 'p1', 'p2' ];
call_me ( x[0], x[1], x[2] ); // i don't like it

function call_me (param0, param1, param2 ) {
    // ...
}

Is there a better way of passing the contents of x into call_me()?

Ps. I can't change the signature of call_me(), nor the way x is defined.

Thanks in advance

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1  
If you can't edit the function signature or how x is declared, then I don't really see how you could change it into anything better –  Karl Johan May 18 '10 at 9:59
    
    
This question was asked about the same time as the other one, and have twice as many views (so far). This means this one is easier to find. I suggest to define the other one as a duplicate, since the "page rank" for this one is higher. But if some admin will decide to delete (or whatever is to be done with a dup here on SO), i won't shed a tear. –  Robert Aug 13 at 20:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 92 down vote accepted

This does exactly what you want:

var x = [ 'p0', 'p1', 'p2' ];
call_me.apply(this, x);

Read more about apply here

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Thanx, that's what i wanted. –  Robert May 18 '10 at 11:57
1  
As a side note, if anyone wants to pass an associative array (named keys) instead, then use an object. Coming from PHP (and always led to this thread by google) this took me a while to figure out. You can pass the whole object as a parameter then. w3schools.com/js/js_objects.asp –  unegma May 29 at 8:56

Assuming that call_me is a global function, so you don't expect this to be set.

var x = ['p0', 'p1', 'p2'];
call_me.apply(null, x);
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Why dont you pass the entire array and process it as needed inside the function?

Like so:

var x = [ 'p0', 'p1', 'p2' ]; 
call_me(x)
function call_me(params){
  for(i=0;i<params.length;i++){
    alert(params[i])
  }
}
share|improve this answer
12  
It's because i can't modify call_me(). It is defined in some other library and it is not possible to mess with the API. –  Robert May 18 '10 at 11:54

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