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I want to display a basic html table with controls to toggle showing/hiding of additional columns:

<table id="mytable">
    <tr>
        <th>Column 1</th>
        <th class="col1">1a</th>
        <th class="col1">1b</th>
        <th>Column 2</th>
        <th class="col2">2a</th>
        <th class="col2">2b</th>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>100</td>
        <td class="col1">40</td>
        <td class="col1">60</td>
        <td>200</td>
        <td class="col2">110</td>
        <td class="col2">90</td>
    </tr>
</table>

So Column 1 and Column 2 will be the only columns displayed by default - but when you click on the Column 1 I want 1a and 1b to toggle, and same with Column 2 with 2a and 2b. I may end up with more columns and lots of rows - so any javascript looping approaches have been too slow to work with when I tested.

The only approach that seems to be fast enough is to set up some css like this:

table.hide1 .col1 { display: none; }
table.hide2 .col2 { display: none; }
table.hide3 .col3 { display: none; }

table.show1 .col1 { display: table-cell; }
table.show2 .col2 { display: table-cell; }
table.show3 .col3 { display: table-cell; }

And then set up onClick function calls on the table header cells that will trigger a toggle - and determine which css class to set "mytable" to that will create the toggle effect that I'm looking for. Is there an easy way to set this up so that the code can work for n # of columns?

Update

Here is what I came up with, works great - and really fast. Let me know if you can think of ways to improve.

CSS

.col1 {display: none; }
.col2 {display: none; }
.col3 {display: none; }

table.show1 .col1 { display: table-cell; }
table.show2 .col2 { display: table-cell; }
table.show3 .col3 { display: table-cell; }

Javascript

function toggleColumn(n) {
    var currentClass = document.getElementById("mytable").className;
    if (currentClass.indexOf("show"+n) != -1) {
        document.getElementById("mytable").className = currentClass.replace("show"+n, "");
    }
    else {
        document.getElementById("mytable").className += " " + "show"+n;
    }
}

And the html snippet:

<table id="mytable">
<tr>
    <th onclick="toggleColumn(1)">Col 1 = A + B + C</th>
    <th class="col1">A</th>
    <th class="col1">B</th>
    <th class="col1">C</th>
    <th onclick="toggleColumn(2)">Col 2 = D + E + F</th>
    <th class="col2">D</th>
    <th class="col2">E</th>
    <th class="col2">F</th>
    <th onclick="toggleColumn(3)">Col 3 = G + H + I</th>
    <th class="col3">G</th>
    <th class="col3">H</th>
    <th class="col3">I</th>
</tr>
<tr>
    <td>20</td>
    <td class="col1">10</td>
    <td class="col1">10</td>
    <td class="col1">0</td>
    <td>20</td>
    <td class="col2">10</td>
    <td class="col2">8</td>
    <td class="col2">2</td>
    <td>20</td>
    <td class="col3">10</td>
    <td class="col3">8</td>
    <td class="col3">2</td>
</tr>
</table>
share|improve this question
    
Ok so there doesn't seem to be another way to do this - but is there a way to do it so its a "sticky" toggle? Right now, every time I show one column, the other column that was showing goes into the hide state. I guess I have to add css rules to specifically handle every permutation??? I hope not...won't be fun if I'm dealing with 5 show/hide columns. –  Art Peterson May 18 '10 at 15:56
1  
Hmm IE7 does not like the solution I posted. I can get it to work with all the columns showing by default, but not with hiding by default... –  Art Peterson May 18 '10 at 20:00
    
You can add multiple classes: table.className= 'show1 show3' etc. I suspect the IE problem is that, as I mentioned, it does not support display: table-cell. I'd use classes like hide instead of show, so you only have to declare table.hide1 col1 { display: none; }. –  bobince May 18 '10 at 20:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

No, that's pretty much it. In theory you could use visibility: collapse on some <col>​s to do it, but browser support isn't all there.

To improve what you've got slightly, you could use table-layout: fixed on the <table> to allow the browser to use the simpler, faster and more predictable fixed-table-layout algorithm. You could also drop the .show rules as when a cell isn't made display: none by a .hide rule it will automatically be display: table-cell. Allowing table display to revert to default rather than setting it explicitly avoids problems in IE<8, where the table display values are not supported.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for mentioning table-layout:fixed. I've found that to be a huge help when displaying table formatted data. –  Chris Lively May 18 '10 at 15:26
    
Thanks for bringing up the table-layout:fixed, but it didn't work in my case. Dealing with a monster table with fluctuating column sizes which ends up needing table-layout:auto to look presentable. –  Art Peterson May 18 '10 at 18:28
    
That's a shame. Fixed tables can be much smoother than auto. (fixed doesn't necessarily mean all the columns have to have a fixed width, just that the widths don't depend on the amount of content in each cell.) –  bobince May 18 '10 at 20:10
    

One line of code using jQuery:

$('td:nth-child(2)').hide();

// If your table has header(th), use this:
//$('td:nth-child(2),th:nth-child(2)').hide();

Source: Hide a Table Column with a Single line of jQuery code

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks! This selector also works great when you are trying to hide certain columns for a print style sheet. –  ThatAintWorking Apr 15 at 22:19

I don't think there is anything you can do to avoid what you are already doing, however, if you are building the table on the client with javascript, you can always add the style rules dynamically, so you can allow for any number of columns without cluttering up your css file with all those rules. See http://www.hunlock.com/blogs/Totally_Pwn_CSS_with_Javascript if you don't know how to do this.

Edit: For your "sticky" toggle, you should just append class names rather than replacing them. For instance, you can give it a class name of "hide2 hide3" etc. I don't think you really need the "show" classes, since that would be the default. Libraries like jQuery make this easy, but in the absence, a function like this might help:

var modifyClassName = function (elem, add, string) {
var s = (elem.className) ? elem.className : "";
var a = s.split(" ");
if (add) {
  for (var i=0; i<a.length; i++) {
      if (a[i] == string) {
          return;
          }
      }
  s += " " + string;
  }
else {
    s = "";
    for (var i=0; i<a.length; i++) {
        if (a[i] != string)
            s += a[i] + " "; 
        }
    }
elem.className = s;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your edit helped me a lot! The sticky toggle is really easy now that I saw this! –  Art Peterson May 18 '10 at 17:56

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