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I have two tables, rating:

+-----------+-----------+-------------+----------+
| rating_id | entity_id | rating_code | position |
+-----------+-----------+-------------+----------+
|         1 |         1 | Quality     |        0 |
|         2 |         1 | Value       |        0 |
|         3 |         1 | Price       |        0 |
+-----------+-----------+-------------+----------+

And rating_option

+-----------+-----------+------+-------+----------+
| option_id | rating_id | code | value | position |
+-----------+-----------+------+-------+----------+
|         1 |         1 | 1    |     1 |        1 |
|         2 |         1 | 2    |     2 |        2 |
|         3 |         1 | 3    |     3 |        3 |
|         4 |         1 | 4    |     4 |        4 |
|         5 |         1 | 5    |     5 |        5 |
|         6 |         2 | 1    |     1 |        1 |
|         7 |         2 | 2    |     2 |        2 |
|         8 |         2 | 3    |     3 |        3 |
|         9 |         2 | 4    |     4 |        4 |
|        10 |         2 | 5    |     5 |        5 |
|        11 |         3 | 1    |     1 |        1 |
|        12 |         3 | 2    |     2 |        2 |
|        13 |         3 | 3    |     3 |        3 |
|        14 |         3 | 4    |     4 |        4 |
|        15 |         3 | 5    |     5 |        5 |
+-----------+-----------+------+-------+----------+

I need a SQL query (not application level, must stay in the database) which will select a set of ratings randomly. A sample result would look like this, but would pick a random value for each rating_id on subsequent calls:

+-----------+-----------+------+-------+----------+
| option_id | rating_id | code | value | position |
+-----------+-----------+------+-------+----------+
|         1 |         1 | 1    |     1 |        1 |
|         8 |         2 | 3    |     3 |        3 |
|        15 |         3 | 5    |     5 |        5 |
+-----------+-----------+------+-------+----------+

I'm totally stuck on the random part, and grouping by rating_id has been a crap shoot so far. Any MySQL ninjas want to take a stab?

Thanks, Joe


EDIT: I've tried rand() in a bunch of combinations, and I'm sure that it will be necessary to create the randomness of the result, but I cannot figure out how to return one random row for each of the rows in rating. I cannot use order by rand() limit 1 because I need three rows, and order by rand() limit 3 won't give me one of each rating_id, which is the ultimate goal. I need a combination of rand() and either subqueries or joins so that I can ensure one of each rating_id.

share|improve this question
    
Does the first table have anything to do with this? It seems unused –  Michael Mrozek May 18 '10 at 17:06
    
Should your results just return randomly, the rows from rating_option? where from that record, the individual fields remain static, or do you want each option ID to have its own "values" changed as well? –  DRapp May 18 '10 at 17:06
    
@Michael Mrozek: Looks like it defines the three existing rating_id values, and he needs one random row with each of those as his final result. –  Chad Birch May 18 '10 at 17:07
    
@Michael, Chad is correct. The first table could potentially be unused, but the closest I've gotten to correct solutions actually joined on that table, so I figured I'd preempt any questions on it and include it. If you don't need it, all the simpler :) –  Joseph Mastey May 18 '10 at 17:14
    
@DRapp I want a random selection from the rows in rating_option, but I need to ensure that exactly one row is included for each of the rows in rating –  Joseph Mastey May 18 '10 at 17:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Alright, a little messy, but seems to do the job. Someone may know what they're doing better than I do that can clean this up:

SELECT random.rating_id, random.rand_option_id, r3.code, r3.value, r3.position
FROM
    (SELECT r.rating_id,
        (SELECT r2.option_id
         FROM rating_option r2
         WHERE r2.rating_id = r.rating_id
         ORDER BY RAND() LIMIT 1) AS 'rand_option_id'
     FROM rating_option r
     GROUP BY r.rating_id
    ) random
    LEFT JOIN rating_option AS r3 ON r3.option_id = rand_option_id

Results (varies every time, of course):

+-----------+----------------+------+-------+----------+
| rating_id | rand_option_id | code | value | position |
+-----------+----------------+------+-------+----------+
|         1 |              4 |    4 |     4 |        4 |
|         2 |              6 |    1 |     1 |        1 |
|         3 |             13 |    3 |     3 |        3 |
+-----------+----------------+------+-------+----------+
share|improve this answer
    
Stellar, works just the way I asked. Thanks! –  Joseph Mastey May 18 '10 at 17:44

You could use the rand() function to do sorting in a select on the rating table.

For example:

select rating_id from rating order by rand() limit 1
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know what sorting by rand on rating does for me, since I need an entry for every row that exists in rating. I can do rand() on rating_option, but then I need to guarantee that one row will appear for each row in rating, which is where the problem lies. –  Joseph Mastey May 18 '10 at 17:20

As clarified in your comments, and the other posts above

select * from rating_option order by rand()

will return all records in a random order... However, if you want only X number, then inclue that as the limit as noted by others

select * from rating_option order by rand() limit 5 (or whatever number)
share|improve this answer
    
But that will not guarantee one record for each rating_id. –  Joseph Mastey May 18 '10 at 17:23
    
The first one WILL... However, the second will only give based on a subset. For example, company drug/alcohol testing will have a pool of employees -- say 200, and they want a 10% pool, you would limit to the first 20 people, it will just guarantee that one ID will only appear ONCE in the list. –  DRapp May 18 '10 at 17:52

Have you looked into the rand() function?

SELECT column FROM table
ORDER BY RAND()
LIMIT 1

http://www.petefreitag.com/item/466.cfm

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/mathematical-functions.html#function_rand

Sample code

select *
from rating_option
group by rating_id
order by rand()
share|improve this answer
    
I can select a single row w/ rand(), but I want to select three random rows, one for each rating entry (and there may be more rating entries later, so I can't even use limit 3). I played around w/ rand() plus joins against rating, but was unable to generate one from each rating with any success. I remain open to suggestion :) –  Joseph Mastey May 18 '10 at 17:08
    
I don't understand what you're joining. Your comment above says the "first table could potentially be unused" and the targeted resultset shows only columns from the 'rating_option' table. Could you elaborate on the topic? Even with joins the ORDER BY RAND() and LIMIT clauses should be effective. –  gurun8 May 18 '10 at 17:55
    
Hold up! I think I see what you're aiming for. You need a result for each rating_id each resultset. Add a "GROUP BY rating_id" to the query. –  gurun8 May 18 '10 at 17:58
1  
That will just give you the first row for each rating_id, but with the three "first rows" in a random order. –  Chad Birch May 18 '10 at 18:07
    
You're right. I didn't realize that until you pointed it out. Thanks for the input and correction. –  gurun8 May 18 '10 at 20:06

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