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I'm trying to insert a timestamp (hour:min:sec) into a two-byte array and i'm a little confused on how to accomplish this...any help is greatly appreciated!

int Hour = CTime::GetCurrentTime().GetHour(); 
int Minute = CTime::GetCurrentTime().GetMinute(); 
int Second = CTime::GetCurrentTime().GetSecond(); 

BYTE arry[2];

//Need to insert 'Hour', 'Minute', & 'Second' into 'arry'

Thanks!

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Is this homework? –  Xorlev May 18 '10 at 17:48

2 Answers 2

You can't. There are potentially 86402 seconds in a day (a day can have up to two leap seconds), but the 16 bits available to you in a byte[2] array can only represent 65536 separate values.

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A day cannot have more than one leap second (no matter what the documentation for gmtime() and friends states -- the POSIX committee screwed up bigtime on this one). –  Jim Lewis May 18 '10 at 17:30
    
How could I accomplish this if I could increase the size of my byte array? –  JB_SO May 18 '10 at 17:30
    
if you want to use an 8 character array you use: sprintf(arry, "%d:%d:%d", Hour, Minute, Second); But that is old style C code. It should work for you if you have 9 bytes (8 plus one for null) –  Tim May 18 '10 at 17:32
2  
If you had three bytes, you could just store it with hours at index 0, minutes at index 1, and seconds at index 2. –  jemfinch May 18 '10 at 17:33
    
So, I could do something like this? BYTE arry[9]; sprintf(arry, "%d:%d:%d", Hour, Minute, Second); –  JB_SO May 18 '10 at 17:34
  1. hour:min:sec is not what people call timestamp. A timestamp is the number of seconds elapsed since 1970-01-01 and will surely not fit into 16 bits.
  2. Assuming ranges of hours=[0;24], minutes=[0;60], seconds=[0;60] (leap seconds included) you will need 5+6+6=17 bits which still won't fit into 16 bits.

If you had a 32-bit array, it would fit:

int Hour = CTime::GetCurrentTime().GetHour(); 
int Minute = CTime::GetCurrentTime().GetMinute(); 
int Second = CTime::GetCurrentTime().GetSecond(); 

uint8_t array[4];

// Just an example
*(uint32_t*)array = (Hour << 12) | (Minute << 6) | Second;

This sounds somewhat like homework for me... or what is the exact purpose of doing this?

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I need to send out "heartbeat" packet every 30ms in our simulation and as part of this packet, I need to include the "timestamp", that's the purpose of this –  JB_SO May 18 '10 at 18:15
    
Here is the info. from the ICD Byte 1 - 2 Bits 15:0 Time Stamp Time Stamp = Time of message (hearbeat message) creation. –  JB_SO May 18 '10 at 18:18

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