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Is there a way to get the count of rows in all tables in a mysql database without running a SELECT count() on each table?

Cheers

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Extended answer that is also accurate for InnoDB: stackoverflow.com/questions/24707814/… –  gwideman Jul 11 at 23:53

14 Answers 14

up vote 117 down vote accepted
SELECT SUM(TABLE_ROWS) 
     FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES 
     WHERE TABLE_SCHEMA = '{your_db}';

Note from the docs though: For InnoDB tables, the row count is only a rough estimate used in SQL optimization. You'll need to use COUNT(*) for exact counts (which is more expensive).

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97  
or, if you want for each table: SELECT table_name, TABLE_ROWS FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES WHERE TABLE_SCHEMA = '{your_db}'; –  TheSoftwareJedi Nov 13 '08 at 2:03
2  
Is there any other way to get table_row and table_name ? Because i want exact result not rough estimate. Thank you. –  krunal shah Apr 1 '11 at 3:35
2  
@krunalshah, This is one of the restrictions of InnoDB. See dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/innodb-restrictions.html, section Restrictions on InnoDB Tables, for more info. You could always use a SELECT COUNT(*) FROM t, which however, is a lot slower –  Marking Feb 23 '12 at 11:21
    
@Marking I'm pretty sure doing a SELECT COUNT(*) ... is still subject to the count estimation –  JamesHalsall Mar 15 '13 at 12:52
    
Jaitsu, no it's not. count(*) (or more realistically count(id)) is what mysql uses to count it's rows isn't it? In any case, I just tested it and got a bigger number for the count() call, whatever that is worth. –  Codygman May 24 '13 at 16:24

You can probably put something together with Tables table. I've never done it, but it looks like it has a column for *TABLE_ROWS* and one for TABLE NAME.

To get rows per table, you can use a query like this:

SELECT table_name, table_rows
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES
WHERE TABLE_SCHEMA = '**YOUR SCHEMA**';
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Thanks that works too. –  Mark Nov 13 '08 at 3:22
1  
Is there any other way to get table_row and table_name ? Because i want exact result not rough estimate. Thank you. –  krunal shah Apr 1 '11 at 3:35
    
as kuranl mentioned this returns just an estimate and will probably return different results when run a couple of times –  Kris Dec 12 '12 at 12:12
    
Tables with at least ~250 records seem to report a different number of rows each time I run this query. –  Arthur Aug 1 '13 at 14:25

Like @Venkatramanan and others I found INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES unreliable (using InnoDB, MySQL 5.1.44), giving different row counts each time I run it even on quiesced tables. Here's a relatively hacky (but flexible/adaptable) way of generating a big SQL statement you can paste into a new query, without installing Ruby gems and stuff.

SELECT CONCAT(
    'SELECT "', 
    table_name, 
    '" AS table_name, COUNT(*) AS exact_row_count FROM ', 
    table_schema,
    '.',
    table_name, 
    ' UNION '
) 
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES 
WHERE table_schema = '**my_schema**';

It produces output like this:

SELECT "func" AS table_name, COUNT(*) AS exact_row_count FROM my_schema.func UNION                         
SELECT "general_log" AS table_name, COUNT(*) AS exact_row_count FROM my_schema.general_log UNION           
SELECT "help_category" AS table_name, COUNT(*) AS exact_row_count FROM my_schema.help_category UNION       
SELECT "help_keyword" AS table_name, COUNT(*) AS exact_row_count FROM my_schema.help_keyword UNION         
SELECT "help_relation" AS table_name, COUNT(*) AS exact_row_count FROM my_schema.help_relation UNION       
SELECT "help_topic" AS table_name, COUNT(*) AS exact_row_count FROM my_schema.help_topic UNION             
SELECT "host" AS table_name, COUNT(*) AS exact_row_count FROM my_schema.host UNION                         
SELECT "ndb_binlog_index" AS table_name, COUNT(*) AS exact_row_count FROM my_schema.ndb_binlog_index UNION 

Copy and paste except for the last UNION to get nice output like,

+------------------+-----------------+
| table_name       | exact_row_count |
+------------------+-----------------+
| func             |               0 |
| general_log      |               0 |
| help_category    |              37 |
| help_keyword     |             450 |
| help_relation    |             990 |
| help_topic       |             504 |
| host             |               0 |
| ndb_binlog_index |               0 |
+------------------+-----------------+
8 rows in set (0.01 sec)
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1  
Thanks, I was hoping I wouldn't have to install any plugins/gems to get exact counts. –  bradvido Sep 2 at 20:02
3  
@bradvido I know right? Ain't nobody got time for that. –  Nathan Sep 2 at 23:26
DELIMITER $$

CREATE DEFINER=`root`@`127.0.0.1` PROCEDURE `COUNT_ALL_RECORDS_BY_TABLE`()
BEGIN
DECLARE done INT DEFAULT 0;
DECLARE TNAME CHAR(255);

DECLARE table_names CURSOR for 
    SELECT table_name FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES WHERE TABLE_SCHEMA = DATABASE();

DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR NOT FOUND SET done = 1;

OPEN table_names;   

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS TCOUNTS;
CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE TCOUNTS 
  (
    TABLE_NAME CHAR(255),
    RECORD_COUNT INT
  ) ENGINE = MEMORY; 


WHILE done = 0 DO

  FETCH NEXT FROM table_names INTO TNAME;

   IF done = 0 THEN
    SET @SQL_TXT = CONCAT("INSERT INTO TCOUNTS(SELECT '" , TNAME  , "' AS TABLE_NAME, COUNT(*) AS RECORD_COUNT FROM ", TNAME, ")");

    PREPARE stmt_name FROM @SQL_TXT;
    EXECUTE stmt_name;
    DEALLOCATE PREPARE stmt_name;  
  END IF;

END WHILE;

CLOSE table_names;

SELECT * FROM TCOUNTS;

SELECT SUM(RECORD_COUNT) AS TOTAL_DATABASE_RECORD_CT FROM TCOUNTS;

END
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1  
-1 for zero documentation. Sometimes, I don't want to read all the code. –  CatShoes Aug 28 '13 at 13:17
 SELECT TABLE_NAME,SUM(TABLE_ROWS) 
 FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES 
 WHERE TABLE_SCHEMA = 'your_db' 
 GROUP BY TABLE_NAME;

That's all you need.

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This answer adds nothing new and it's almost the same as the accepted answer. –  fancyPants Oct 4 '12 at 9:36

I just run:

show table status;

This will give you the row count for EVERY table plus a bunch of other info. I used to use the selected answer above, but this is much easier.

I'm not sure if this works with all versions, but I'm using 5.5 with InnoDB engine.

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Unfortunately, if you're using InnoDB, this approach suffers from the same inaccuracies as the other methods described above. For example, I have an InnoDB table that has approximately 65,000 rows, yet these methods here report that it has anywhere from 350,000 to over 780,000. –  PeterToTheThird Mar 12 at 1:53

If you use the database information_schema, you can use this mysql code (the where part makes the query not show tables that have a null value for rows):

SELECT TABLE_NAME, TABLE_ROWS
FROM `TABLES`
WHERE `TABLE_ROWS` >=0
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If you want the exact numbers, use the following ruby script. You need Ruby and RubyGems.

Install following Gems:

$> gem install dbi
$> gem install dbd-mysql

File: count_table_records.rb

require 'rubygems'
require 'dbi'

db_handler = DBI.connect('DBI:Mysql:database_name:localhost', 'username', 'password')

# Collect all Tables
sql_1 = db_handler.prepare('SHOW tables;')
sql_1.execute
tables = sql_1.map { |row| row[0]}
sql_1.finish

tables.each do |table_name|
  sql_2 = db_handler.prepare("SELECT count(*) FROM #{table_name};")
  sql_2.execute
  sql_2.each do |row|
    puts "Table #{table_name} has #{row[0]} rows."
  end
  sql_2.finish
end

db_handler.disconnect

Go back to the command-line:

$> ruby count_table_records.rb

Output:

Table users has 7328974 rows.
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This is how I count TABLES and ALL RECORDS using PHP:

$dtb = mysql_query("SHOW TABLES") or die (mysql_error());
$jmltbl = 0;
$jml_record = 0;
$jml_record = 0;

while ($row = mysql_fetch_array($dtb)) { 
    $sql1 = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM " . $row[0]);            
    $jml_record = mysql_num_rows($sql1);            
    echo "Table: " . $row[0] . ": " . $jml_record record . "<br>";      
    $jmltbl++;
    $jml_record += $jml_record;
}

echo "--------------------------------<br>$jmltbl Tables, $jml_record > records.";
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The following query produces a(nother) query that will get the value of count(*) for every table, from every schema, listed in information_schema.tables. The entire result of the query shown here - all rows taken together - comprise a valid SQL statement ending in a semicolon - no dangling 'union'. The dangling union is avoided by use of a union in the query below.

select concat('select "', table_schema, '.', table_name, '" as `schema.table`,
                          count(*)
                 from ', table_schema, '.', table_name, ' union ') as 'Query Row'
  from information_schema.tables
 union
 select '(select null, null limit 0);';
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I wrote a simple PHP script using Nathan's query recommendations. I hope it can be useful for somebody here.

You can get it here at my blog.

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You can try this. It is working fine for me.

SELECT IFNULL(table_schema,'Total') "Database",TableCount 
FROM (SELECT COUNT(1) TableCount,table_schema 
      FROM information_schema.tables 
      WHERE table_schema NOT IN ('information_schema','mysql') 
      GROUP BY table_schema WITH ROLLUP) A;

Thanks and Regards, Nimesh P.

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This is what I do to get the actual count (no using the schema)

It's slower but more accurate.

It's a two step process at

  1. Get list of tables for your db. You can get it using

    mysql -uroot -p mydb -e "show tables"

  2. create and assign the list of tables to the array variable in this bash script (separated by a single space just like in the code below)

    array=( table1 table2 table3 )

    for i in "${array[@]}"

    do

    echo $i

    mysql -uroot mydb -e "select count(*) from $i"

    done

  3. run it:

    chmod +x script.sh; ./script.sh

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Poster wanted row counts without counting, but didn't specify which table engine. With InnoDB, I only know one way, which is to count.

This is how I pick my potatoes:

# Put this function in your bash and call with:
# rowpicker DBUSER DBPASS DBNAME [TABLEPATTERN]
function rowpicker() {
    UN=$1
    PW=$2
    DB=$3
    if [ ! -z "$4" ]; then
        PAT="LIKE '$4'"
        tot=-2
    else
        PAT=""
        tot=-1
    fi
    for t in `mysql -u "$UN" -p"$PW" "$DB" -e "SHOW TABLES $PAT"`;do
        if [ $tot -lt 0 ]; then
            echo "Skipping $t";
            let "tot += 1";
        else
            c=`mysql -u "$UN" -p"$PW" "$DB" -e "SELECT count(*) FROM $t"`;
            c=`echo $c | cut -d " " -f 2`;
            echo "$t: $c";
            let "tot += c";
        fi;
    done;
    echo "total rows: $tot"
}

I am making no assertions about this other than that this is a really ugly but effective way to get how many rows exist in each table in the database regardless of table engine and without having to have permission to install stored procedures, and without needing to install ruby or php. Yes, its rusty. Yes it counts. count(*) is accurate.

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protected by Brad Larson Mar 27 at 15:24

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