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My code was almost finished that a maddening bug came up! When I nullify the last node to finalize the link list , it actually dumps all the links and make the first node link Null ! when i trace it , its working totally fine creating the list in the loop but after the loop is done that happens and it destroys the rest of the link by doing so, and i don't understand why something so obvious is becoming problematic! (last line)

struct poly { public int coef; public int pow; public poly* link;} ;
        poly* start ;
        poly* start2;
        poly* p;
        poly* second;
        poly* result;
        poly* ptr;
        poly* start3;
        poly* q;
        poly* q2;
        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            string holder = "";
            IntPtr newP = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(sizeof(poly));
            q = (poly*)newP.ToPointer();
            start = q;
            int i = 0;
            while (this.textBox1.Text[i] != ',')
            {
                holder += this.textBox1.Text[i];
                i++;
            }
            q->coef = int.Parse(holder);
            i++;
            holder = "";
            while (this.textBox1.Text[i] != ';')
            {
                holder += this.textBox1.Text[i];
                i++;
            }
            q->pow = int.Parse(holder);
            holder = "";
            p = start;
            //creation of the first node finished!
            i++;
            for (; i < this.textBox1.Text.Length; i++)
            {
                newP = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(sizeof(poly));
                poly* test = (poly*)newP.ToPointer();
                while (this.textBox1.Text[i] != ',')
                {
                    holder += this.textBox1.Text[i];
                    i++;
                }
                test->coef = int.Parse(holder);
                holder = "";
                i++;

                while (this.textBox1.Text[i] != ';' && i < this.textBox1.Text.Length - 1)
                {
                    holder += this.textBox1.Text[i];
                    if (i < this.textBox1.Text.Length - 1)
                        i++;
                }
                test->pow = int.Parse(holder);
                holder = "";
                p->link = test;    //the addresses are correct and the list is complete
            }
            p->link = null;        //only the first node exists now with a null link!
}
share|improve this question
4  
Why are you using unsafe code for this? – ChaosPandion May 18 '10 at 19:34
2  
Why are you using pointers at all? – sepp2k May 18 '10 at 19:43
5  
you don't need pointers to build a linked list in C# – Ion Todirel May 18 '10 at 19:44
2  
@Yasin: No, it doesn't require pointers. You need pointers when you need to do pointer arithmetic. For everything else normal references work just fine. Unless the assignment explicitly says to use structs and pointers, I highly recommend you turn poly into a class (i.e. reference type) and stop using pointers. This will clean up your code a lot. – sepp2k May 18 '10 at 19:51
3  
There is not a single reason, even academic, to use unsafe pointers to a struct in C#. – user7116 May 18 '10 at 20:10
up vote 7 down vote accepted

p always holds reference to the first element, so yes, p->link = null; does exactly what you said. It seems to me that you wanted something like this :

    ...
    p->link = test;
    p = test;
    ....

Edit :

Proof of concept

public unsafe struct poly { public int coef; public int pow; public poly* link; }

public unsafe class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {            
        poly* temp1, temp2, start =
            (poly*)Marshal.AllocHGlobal(sizeof(poly)).ToPointer();
        start->coef = 0;
        start->pow = 0;
        temp1 = start;
        for (int i = 1; i < 10; i++)
        {
            temp2 = (poly*)Marshal.AllocHGlobal(sizeof(poly)).ToPointer();
            temp2->coef = i;
            temp2->pow = i;
            temp1->link = temp2;
            temp1 = temp2;
        }
        temp1->link = null;
        temp1 = start;

        while (temp1 != null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(
                string.Format(
                    "eoef:{0}, pow:{1}", 
                    temp1->coef, 
                    temp1->pow));
            temp1 = temp1->link;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
what about the null link of the last node ?! how does this take care of that ? – Yasin May 18 '10 at 19:52
    
if in doubt, null it manually. The documentation for AllocHGlobal specifically says that it doesn't null the memory allocated, so you should ensure the pointer is null yourself. – Lasse V. Karlsen May 18 '10 at 19:56
    
@diadistis: sorry its not working. this will also spoil the link list by assigning test to p since test is a single node created in each loop – Yasin May 18 '10 at 20:01
1  
p = test; must go right after p->link = test; just before for-loop ends. When you exit the loop, p will be the last element and p->link = null; will work as expected. At that time you can access the list using start. – Diadistis May 18 '10 at 20:07
2  
No problem mate, but you should know that every time you run this code, a kitten dies... – Diadistis May 18 '10 at 20:38

I seriously recommend you take a step back and clean up your code. From just a basic glance it doesn't seem to be doing very much for the amount of code you have written. Take notice of the blocks of duplicate code that differ only by the end condition. They are prime candidates for methods. With a few minutes of refactoring you could probably cut out half of your code and get a clear picture of what you are trying to accomplish and easily find the error.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah you are right this code is such a mess but i had to do it too quickly and i have to submit it to my professor in a few hours :D – Yasin May 18 '10 at 19:47
    
Would you rather submit something that looks beautiful, but doesn't work, or something that looks like a mess, and still doesn't work? – Lasse V. Karlsen May 18 '10 at 19:53
    
well it must work if this simple yet unknown bug gets fixed ! – Yasin May 18 '10 at 19:57
3  
If a student handed me code that looked like it was designed by committee, they would get a low grade even if it worked. Maintainability and understandability are important aspects. Also, if your Professor does a google search on the first line, s/he will find this page at the top of the search results. Maybe s/he will give you credit for using SO ;-) – Simon Chadwick May 18 '10 at 20:04
    
well i'm sure he wont google it :D . he is old enough not to do that, lol. also he wont really look at the code – Yasin May 18 '10 at 20:32

Edit: struct linked list without unsafe pointers...weirdest requirement in a class ever.

public struct Polynomial
{
    public int Coefficient;
    public int Power;
    public Polynomial? Link;
}

private Polynomial? start;

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    string holder = String.Empty;
    start = new Polynomial();
    int i = 0;
    while (this.textBox1.Text[i] != ',')
    {
        holder += this.textBox1.Text[i];
        i++;
    }

    start.Value.Coefficient = Int32.Parse(holder);

    i++;
    holder = String.Empty;
    while (this.textBox1.Text[i] != ';')
    {
        holder += this.textBox1.Text[i];
        i++;
    }

    start.Value.Power = Int32.Parse(holder);
    Polynomial? p = start;

    //creation of the first node finished!
    i++;
    for (; i < this.textBox1.Text.Length; i++)
    {
        Polynomial? test = new Polynomial();

        holder = String.Empty;
        while (this.textBox1.Text[i] != ',')
        {
            holder += this.textBox1.Text[i];
            i++;
        }

        test.Value.Coefficient = Int32.Parse(holder);

        i++;
        holder = String.Empty;
        while (this.textBox1.Text[i] != ';' && i < this.textBox1.Text.Length - 1)
        {
            holder += this.textBox1.Text[i];
            if (i < this.textBox1.Text.Length - 1)
                i++;
        }

        test.Value.Power = Int32.Parse(holder);
        p.Value.Link = test;    //the addresses are correct and the list is complete
        p = test;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thx for the reply dude but i HAVE to do it with structs and i can't use Class – Yasin May 18 '10 at 20:10
    
I have serious trouble believing that...most bizarre requirement ever. You still don't need unsafe pointers, I'll update my code to show that. – user7116 May 18 '10 at 20:23
    
ty, it was very helpful but we also have to use pointers in this program :P . thx again – Yasin May 18 '10 at 20:49
    
Based on reading Yasin's other question, the professor actually asked the students to implement it in C. This was a 'creative' attempt to do it with C-ish syntax in C#. – Dan Bryant May 18 '10 at 20:49
    
@Dan Bryant: Hah, while typing up my answer I was reminded of the line from Billy Madison: "Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul." – user7116 May 19 '10 at 14:05

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