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I have a very simple code (simplified from the original code - so I know it's not a very clever code) that when I compile in Visual Studio 2010 with Code Analysis gives me warning CA1062: Validate arguments of public methods.

public class Foo
{
    protected static void Bar(out int[] x)
    {
        x = new int[1];
        for (int i = 0; i != 1; ++i)
            x[i] = 1;
    }
}

The warning I get:

CA1062 : Microsoft.Design : In externally visible method 'Foo.Bar(out int[])', validate local variable '(*x)', which was reassigned from parameter 'x', before using it.

I don't understand why do I get this warning and how can I resolve it without suppressing it? Can new return null? Is this a Visual Studio 2010 bug?

UPDATE

I've decided to open a bug report on Microsoft Connect.

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I wonder if the problem is elsewhere ... –  Hamish Grubijan May 18 '10 at 20:42
    
Again no repro. There's nothing to validate. You've posted other code analysis warnings that don't repro. If you've made any config changes then be sure to document them. –  Hans Passant May 18 '10 at 20:46
    
@Hans Passant, are you sure you're running all microsoft code analysis rules in Visual Studio 2010? –  brickner May 18 '10 at 20:48
    
I don't see anybody else repro-ing this either. –  Hans Passant May 18 '10 at 23:11
1  
I have reproduced this in Visual Studio 2010 Premium. I just pasted in the class as given in the question, turned on Microsot All Rules in the settings and analysed the project. –  Daniel Renshaw May 20 '10 at 12:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I've reproduced this in Visual Studio 2010 Premium with the code exactly as given and with Microsoft All Rules enabled in the analysis settings.

It looks like this is a bug (see bottom of here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182182.aspx). It is complainng that you are not checking that x is not null before using it, but it's on out parameter so there is no input value to check!

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It's easier to show than to describe :

public class Program
{
    protected static int[] testIntArray;

    protected static void Bar(out int[] x)
    {
        x = new int[100];
        for (int i = 0; i != 100; ++i)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(5);
            x[i] = 1; // NullReferenceException
        }
    }

    protected static void Work()
    {
        Bar(out testIntArray);
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var t1 = new Thread(Work);
        t1.Start();

        while (t1.ThreadState == ThreadState.Running)
        {
            testIntArray = null;
        }
    }
}

And the correct way is :

    protected static void Bar(out int[] x)
    {
        var y = new int[100];

        for (int i = 0; i != 100; ++i)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(5);
            y[i] = 1;
        }

        x = y;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
ok, but why is the correct way correct? Or do you say it's correct because there is no warning thrown in code analysis? –  Gabriel Magana May 18 '10 at 21:06
    
What you've shown is certainly an important point (if x might be accessed by multiple threads) but I don't think this is what CA1062 is intended to highlight. If you read the documentation here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182182.aspx, it's obvious this is intended for ref parameters and is just a standard "check it's not null before using it" rule. It's a bug that it's being applied to out parameters. Does this actually prevent the CA1062 warning? –  Daniel Renshaw May 18 '10 at 21:07
    
@gmagana: The correct way is thread safe and won't throw NullReferenceException no matter what. –  Diadistis May 18 '10 at 21:13
    
@Daniel: "All reference arguments...", out is considered reference argument too. –  Diadistis May 18 '10 at 21:14
    
Yeah, ok. But out is an output only reference argument while ref is input/output reference argument. There's no need to perform input validation (which is what CA1062 is about) on an output-only parameter. –  Daniel Renshaw May 18 '10 at 21:18

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