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I have a list of checkboxes on a form. Due to the way the CSS is structured, the label element is styled directly. This requires me to nest the checkbox inside of the tag.

This works in raw HTML, if you click on the label text, the state of the checkbox changes. It doesn't work with the rails <%= f.check_box %> helper, however, because it outputs a hidden input tag first.

In summary,

<label>
   <%= f.check_box :foo %>
   Foo
</label>

this is the output I want:

<label>
    <input type="checkbox" ... /> 
    <input type="hidden" ... />
    Foo
</label>

...but this is what rails is giving me:

<label>
    <input type="hidden" ... />
    <input type="checkbox" ... />
    Foo
</label>

So the label behavior doesn't actually work :(.

Is there any way to get around this?

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So when nesting <input> elements inside a <label> tag, if you don't specify a for="id", the label targets the first input child? And because rails renders the hidden input first, you need to swap the output of the inputs? Am I understanding this correctly? –  maček May 18 '10 at 22:21
    
That is correct, however nfm noted that the order is sensitive and won't actually work the other way around. –  Ben Scheirman May 19 '10 at 3:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Rails generates the hidden input before the checkbox because it needs a way to know whether the form was submitted with the checkbox unchecked. The order is sensitive as the checkbox overrides the hidden input if it has been checked. See the Rails API for details.

You should use <label for="checkbox_id"> rather than wrapping the checkbox in your label tag.

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1  
This is what I ended up doing, but it seemed unnecessary to provide my own :id to the checkbox just so I can use it in the label. Thanks for the info on why though. –  Ben Scheirman May 19 '10 at 3:05
    
Twitter Bootstrap is using this nested syntax. –  Jan Sep 9 '13 at 12:50

This works for me:

<%= f.label :foo do %>
  <%= f.check_box :foo %>
  Foo
<% end %>

Renders:

<label for="foo">
  <input name="foo" type="hidden" value="0">
  <input checked="checked" id="foo" name="foo" type="checkbox" value="1">
  Foo
</label>
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1  
Seems in this way there no oppotunities to use automatic transliteration as described here api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionView/Helpers/…. Am i right? Sorry for bad English. –  woto Sep 23 '13 at 6:54

That's not the way to use the label tag. Instead use it like this:

<input type="hidden" ... /> <!-- doesn't really matter where these are -->

<label for="id_of_element">Foo</label>
<input type="checkbox" id="id_of_element" ... />

Now "Foo" acts as a label for the checkbox element, and you can click on "Foo" to check or uncheck it.

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8  
That's a perfectly acceptable way to use the label tag. See here: w3.org/TR/html401/interact/forms.html#h-17.9.1 especially this: "for = idref [CS]. This attribute explicitly associates the label being defined with another control. When present, the value of this attribute must be the same as the value of the id attribute of some other control in the same document. When absent, the label being defined is associated with the element's contents." EDIT: I'll step off my HTML high-horse & give you that this is a place where Rails is incompatible with the correct use of label –  Ben May 18 '10 at 22:13

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