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I'm having a heck of a time getting a site I modified to work correctly. I didn't set the site up originally, and since the person that set it up no longer works with me I had to learn ruby just to make some changes. I made all the changes in the development server and everything worked fine. Then I did a diff on the production and development and moved only my changes over. Unfortunately when I loaded my changes onto the production server I got a lot of errors.

I've changed all of the permissions to 755, which took care being able to access anything at all, but after that I started getting a lot of 500 errors. Nothing showed up in the production.log file. I really have no clue what's going wrong except that perhaps things are not noticing the new changes. I moved the old site to a backup folder, and the new site crashes whenever it goes to anything that I've changed. In particular, I added a link to a new setup with an extra controller/model/view group. It works fine on development but in production it gives me a 404. Yes, I did copy all the files up.

I even put everything back how it was, but the website is still showing the broken version of it. I checked the tmp/cache folder but it was empty. Running dispatch.fcgi shows the old site (which I expected) but it still shows the flawed new site when I connect through a browser.

I've been tearing my hair out trying to get this to work. Any ideas as to how I can get this to work?

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Did you use the "script/server" mini-server during development to prepare your changes? could you provide some more detail on how the production app is deployed? from what you explained I assume it's using the FastCGI method but it'd be better not to speculate. Things like whether it's deployed using Capistrano might better enable us to help. Thanks for clarifying. –  Roadmaster May 18 '10 at 22:43
    
I used the script/server mini-server during development. I'm not sure how it's deployed, which is part of my problem as the person who set it up left and no one here knows Ruby. All we have on the server Ruby-wise is Ruby 1.8.6 and RubyGems. If that's not enough information, can you tell me how to find the information needed to determine how it's deployed? Thanks! –  Califer May 18 '10 at 22:51
    
What do you get if you use hurl.it to get the Server header for a page that's part of the site? –  Ben Alpert May 18 '10 at 23:45
    
The server header says... Apache/2.2.8 (Ubuntu) mod_fastcgi/2.4.6 PHP/5.2.4-2ubuntu5.10 with Suhosin-Patch mod_perl/2.0.3 Perl/v5.8.8 –  Califer May 19 '10 at 16:02
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just an idea, have you restarted the production server after making those changes?

In ubuntu or any linux version the command is:

sudo /etc/init.d/apache restart

From your description, seems like the server has not taken the new changes.

Hopefully this helps.

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Restarting Apache cleared things up. Thanks Sam! –  Califer May 20 '10 at 17:49
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Under FastCGI deployment, a cgi "dispatcher" process is started. Apache communicates with this (these) process(es), which are actually responsible for passing requests to/from the Rails app. This way several copies of the app are kept running, and the Apache processes just communicate with these, saving the startup/teardown time associated with non-accelerated CGI requests.

Since it's running in production mode, there's a lot of caching going on, which might explain why you're still seing the old version of the site. When you're in development mode, it explicitly doesn't cache things, so you can see your changes immediately.

I'd try restarting the web server as suggested, this should restart the FastCGI handler as well.

Also, be aware that Rails deployment is somewhat complicated; I'd advise you to read up on it. Also you might want to fiddle with your permissions to make sure the logs are being written to; they contain useful debugging information.

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Thanks for the extra information, but I gave the answer to Sam as he was first. –  Califer May 20 '10 at 17:50
    
No prob - I'm happy as long as you managed to solve the problem. Cheers! –  Roadmaster May 20 '10 at 18:18
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