Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Currently watching Bart De Smet's explanation of IQueryable and he mentioned Existential Types (which I've been curious about for some time). After reading the answers to this question I'm just wondering if this is a way to construct it in C#:

public abstract class SomeExistentialType
{
    private SomeExistentialType() { }


    public abstract int Foo();

    public ExistentialType Create()
    {
        return new ConcreteType1();
    }

    private class ConcreteType1: SomeExistentialType
    {
        public override int Foo()
        {
            //some implementation...
        }
    }

    private class ConcreteType1: SomeExistentialType
    {
        public override int Foo()
        {
            //some implementation...
        }
    }

    private class ConcreteType1: SomeExistentialType
    {
        public override int Foo()
        {
            //some implementation...
        }
    }
}

The idea is that if all of the concrete classes are defined as private nested classes (or maybe just internal classes) then you are forced to only use the interface.

share|improve this question
    
I've had some people comment that one of the feature requests that I've made on the Microsoft .Connect site as an explanation of need for Existential Types. That is the first time I've heard of the phrase. connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/576675/… –  jpierson Dec 23 '10 at 2:04
add comment

2 Answers 2

Sounds a lot like the pImpl idiom.

I'm not a big fan of tricking the developer or forcing them to do something specific in these ways. In C/C++ i could understand the pImpl idiom's justification, because C++ lacks a lot of protections you get in C# and .net, but oh well.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't get protection at all. It adds no info whatsoever to the built product. –  Dani Oct 11 '11 at 5:17
add comment

No, that is not what an existential type is. In the answer's to the other question on existential types, look at the VirtualMachine example.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.