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So I found this thread that was extremely helpful in traversing an array diagonally. I'm stuck though on mirroring it. For example:

var m = 3;
var n = 4;
var a = new Array();
var b = 0;

for(var i = 0; i < m; i++) {
  a[i] = new Array(n);
  for(var j = 0; j < n; j++) {
    a[i][j] = b;
      b++;
  }
}

for (var i = 0; i < m + n - 1; i++) {
  var z1 = (i < n) ? 0 : i - n + 1;
  var z2 = (i < m) ? 0 : i - m + 1;
  for (var j = i - z2; j >= z1; j--) {
    console.log(a[j][i - j]);
  }
}

Console reads [[0],[4,1],[8,5,2],[9,6,3],[10,7],[11]]

I'd like it to read [[8],[4,9],[0,5,10],[1,6,11],[2,7],[3]]

Been stumped for awhile, it's like a rubik's cube >_<

share|improve this question
    
Is this homework? –  Pedery May 19 '10 at 4:41
    
no, self taught programmer ... not in school anymore. Maybe I should go back :P –  jonobr1 May 19 '10 at 19:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, I found the whole z1, z2 logic a bit unreadable, so I did it a bit differently:

var m = 3;
var n = 4;
var a = new Array();
var b = 0;

for(var i = 0; i < m; i++) {
  a[i] = new Array(n);
  for(var j = 0; j < n; j++) {
    a[i][j] = b;
      b++;
  }
}

var out = new Array();
for (var i = 1 - m; i < n; i++) {
    var group = new Array();
    for (var j = 0; j < m; j++) {
        if ((i + j) >= 0 && (i + j) < n) {
            group.push(a[j][i + j]);
        }
    }
    out.push(group);
}
console.log(out);

Prints [[8], [4, 9], [0, 5, 10], [1, 6, 11], [2, 7], [3]] to the console.

How it works

Your matrix construction gives you a rectangle like this (where your a array is the set of rows):

 0  1  2  3
 4  5  6  7
 8  9 10 11

Which means the diagonals are over this grid:

 #  #  0  1  2  3
    #  4  5  6  7  #
       8  9 10 11  #  #

Now we're just looping over a skewed rectangle, that would look like this normalised:

 #  #  0  1  2  3
 #  4  5  6  7  #
 8  9 10 11  #  #

Now you'll notice that for each row you add, you end up with an extra column (starting with a #) and that the first column is now skewed by this amount (if you imagine holding the first row in place & sliding the rows below to the left). So for our outer for loop (over the columns), the first column is effectively the old first column, 0, minus the number of rows m, plus 1, which gives 0 - m + 1 or 1 - m. The last column effectively stays in place, so we're still looping to n. Then its just a matter of taking each column & looping over each of the m rows (inner for loop).

Of course this leaves you with a bunch of undefineds (the #s in the grid above), but we can skip over them with a simple if to make sure our i & j are within the m & n bounds.

Probably slightly less efficient than the z1/z1 version since we're now looping over the redundant # cells rather than pre-calculating them, but it shouldn't make any real world difference & I think the code ends up much more readable.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree, this explains the logic behind it so well. Thanks so much! –  jonobr1 May 19 '10 at 19:10

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