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One way of thinking about this is: if we care about the design of the code then EasyMock is the better choice as it gives feedback to you by its concept of expectations.

If we care about the maintainability of tests (easier to read, write and having less brittle tests which are not affected much by change), then Mockito seems a better choice.

My questions are:

  • If you have used EasyMock in large scale projects, do you find that your tests are harder to maintain?
  • What are the limitations of Mockito (other than endo testing)?
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5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I'm an EasyMock developer so a bit partial but of course I've used EasyMock on large scale projects.

My opinion is that EasyMock tests will indeed breaks once in a while. EasyMock forces you to do a complete recording of what you expect. This requires some discipline. You should really record what is expected not what the tested method currently needs. For instance, if it doesn't matter how many time a method is called on a mock, don't be afraid of using andStubReturn. Also, if you don't care about a parameter, use anyObject() and so on. Thinking in TDD can help on that.

My analyze is that EasyMock tests will break more often but Mockito ones won't when you would want them to. If prefer my tests to break. At least I'm aware of what was the impacts of my development. This is of course, my personal point of view.

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1  
Yes, I have been thinking the same: with Mockito (and Unitils Mock, a similar mocking API) it's much easier to write tests that continue to happily pass when they shouldn't. I suspect this may be the main reason why Mockito-like APIs, which facilite the creation of excessively "loose" tests, are often considered "easier". –  Rogério Jun 8 '10 at 18:06
    
I'd be interested to see an example that contrasts these 2 approaches... –  Armand Jan 28 '11 at 15:23

I won't argue about test readability, size or testing technique of this frameworks, I believe they are equal. But, I'll show you some facts which is distinguish on example:

Given: We've got next class which is responsible to store something somewhere:

public class Service {

    public static final String PATH = "path";
    public static final String NAME = "name";
    public static final String CONTENT = "content";
    private FileDao dao;

    public void doSomething() {
        dao.store(PATH, NAME, IOUtils.toInputStream(CONTENT));
    }

    public void setDao(FileDao dao) {
        this.dao = dao;
    }
}

And we want to test it:

Mockito:

public class ServiceMockitoTest {

    private Service service;

    @Mock
    private FileDao dao;

    @Before
    public void setUp() {
        MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this);
        service = new Service();
        service.setDao(dao);
    }

    @Test
    public void testDoSomething() throws Exception {
        // given
        // when
        service.doSomething();
        // then
        ArgumentCaptor<InputStream> captor = ArgumentCaptor.forClass(InputStream.class);
        Mockito.verify(dao, times(1)).store(eq(Service.PATH), eq(Service.NAME), captor.capture());
        assertThat(Service.CONTENT, is(IOUtils.toString(captor.getValue())));
    }
}

EasyMock:

public class ServiceEasyMockTest {
    private Service service;
    private FileDao dao;

    @Before
    public void setUp() {
        dao = EasyMock.createNiceMock(FileDao.class);
        service = new Service();
        service.setDao(dao);
    }

    @Test
    public void testDoSomething() throws Exception {
        // given
        Capture<InputStream> captured = new Capture<InputStream>();
        dao.store(eq(Service.PATH), eq(Service.NAME), capture(captured));
        replay(dao);
        // when
        service.doSomething();
        // then
        assertThat(Service.CONTENT, is(IOUtils.toString(captured.getValue())));
        verify(dao);
    }
}

As you can see test are fairly same and both of them are passing. Let’s imagine, that somebody else changed Service implementation and try run tests.

New implementation looks like:

dao.store(PATH + separator, NAME, IOUtils.toInputStream(CONTENT));

separator was added at the end of path

How tests result will look like now ? Both of them are failing, but with different error messages:

EasyMock:

java.lang.AssertionError: Nothing captured yet
    at org.easymock.Capture.getValue(Capture.java:78)
    at ServiceEasyMockTest.testDoSomething(ServiceEasyMockTest.java:36)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:39)

Mockito:

Argument(s) are different! Wanted:
dao.store(
    "path",
    "name",
    <Capturing argument>
);
-> at ServiceMockitoTest.testDoSomething(ServiceMockitoTest.java:34)
Actual invocation has different arguments:
dao.store(
    "path\",
    "name",
    java.io.ByteArrayInputStream@1c99159
);
-> at Service.doSomething(Service.java:13)
 <Click to see difference>

What was happened in EasyMock test, why result wasn't captured ? Is store method wasn't executed, but wait a minute, it was, why EasyMock lies to us?

It's because EasyMock mixing two responsibilities in a single line - stubbing and verification. That's why when something is wrong it's hard to understand which part cause failure.

Of course you can tell me - just change the test and move verify before assertion. Wow, are you serious, developers should keep in mind some magic order forced by mocking framework?

By the way, it won’t help:

java.lang.AssertionError: 
  Expectation failure on verify:
    store("path", "name", capture(Nothing captured yet)): expected: 1, actual: 0
    at org.easymock.internal.MocksControl.verify(MocksControl.java:111)
    at org.easymock.classextension.EasyMock.verify(EasyMock.java:211)

Still, it saying to me that method wasn’t executed, but it was, only with another parameters.

Why Mockito is better, because this framework don't mix two responsibilities in single place and when your tests will fail, you will easily understand why.

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4  
good answer - thanks for such a clear, helpful example –  michael Aug 29 '12 at 5:28
    
I'm sold on trying mockito first. Test maintainability is messy enough withhout mock frameworks getting in the way. –  Gary Oct 26 '12 at 3:10

if we care about the Design of the code then Easymock is the better choice as it gives feedback to you by its concept of expectations

Interesting. I found that 'concept of expectations' makes many devs put more & more expectations in the tests only to satisfy UnexpectedMethodCall problem. How does it influence the design?

The test should not break when you change code. The test should break when the feature stops working. If one likes the tests to break when any code change happens I suggest to write a test that asserts the md5 checksum of the java file :)

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3  
>md5 sume nice :) –  geoaxis Mar 12 '12 at 1:00

I don't think you should be too concerned about this. Both Easymock and Mockito can be configured to be 'strict' or 'nice' the only difference is that by default Easymock is strict wheras Mockito is nice.

As with all testing there's no hard and fast rule, you need to balance test confidence against maintainability. I typically find there are certain functional or technical areas that demand a high level of confidence for which I would use 'strict' mocks. For example we probably wouldn't want the debitAccount() method to be called more than once! However there are other cases in which the mock is really little more than a stub so we can test the real 'meat' of the code.

In the early days of Mockito's life API compatibility was a problem but more tools now support the framework. Powermock (a personal favorite) now has a mockito extension

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I prefer mockito to be honest. been using EasyMock with unitils and the combination of both oftenly results in exceptions like IllegalArgumentException: not an interface as well as MissingBehaviorExceptions. In both cases though the code and test code are perfectly fine. It appeared that the MissingBehaviorException was due to the fact that mocked objects created with createMock (using classextentions!!) did produce this error. When using @Mock it did work! I do not like that kind of misleading behavior and for me that is a clear indication the developers of it do not know what they are doing. A good framework should always be easy to use and not ambiguous. The IllegalArgumentException was also due to some mingle of EasyMock internals. Also, the recording is not what I want to do. I want to test if my code throws exceptions or not and that it returns the expected results. That in combination with code coverage is the right tool for me. I do not want my tests to break whenever I put 1 line of code above or below the previous one because that improves performance or so. With mockito it is no problem. With EasyMock, it will result tests to fail even though the code is not broken. That is bad. It costs time, thus money. You want to test for expected behavior. Do you really care about the order of things? I suppose in rare occasions you might. Use Easymock then. In other case, I think you'll spend considerably less time using mockito to write your tests.

Kind regards Lawrence

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