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The following code causes a compiler error, as it is ambiguous call but the problem if we use object instead of ArrayList no error happens and the string version works fine; Do you have an explanation for that?

class A
{
    public A(string x)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("string");
    }
    public A(ArrayList x)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ArrayList");
    }

}
    static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            A o = new A(null);
        }
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I'm sure someone will post a better explanation than I could, but needless to say, you should probably avoid this pattern and implement a default constructor. Oh wait, I said it... –  Dave Markle May 19 '10 at 12:27
1  
What version of .NET do you use? Because if you use 2.0 or over, you could use an IList<T> or whatever other collection that best fits your situation? Implementing a default constructor might also help. –  Will Marcouiller May 19 '10 at 12:28
    
@Will Marcouiller: .Net 3.5 but I wonder about the behavior itself this is an example –  Ahmed Said May 19 '10 at 12:41
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6 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The reason your code works fine if you change the constructor that takes an ArrayList to take an object is that the C# compiler will pick the most specific type applicable. In the case of string/object, string actually derives from object and is therefore "more specific" and will be inferred by the compiler. With string versus ArrayList, it's apples and oranges: either can be null, but neither is more "specific" than the other.

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4  
+1 beat me to the explanation. Your answer is the only one that answers the actual question. –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen May 19 '10 at 12:33
1  
Line of the day : it's apples and oranges: either can be null, but neither is more "specific" than the other. :) –  Pratik Deoghare May 19 '10 at 12:48
    
@TheMachineCharmer: What, you've never eaten a null apple? They're delicious. –  Dan Tao May 19 '10 at 12:56
    
NO. There were only 4 null apples. And they were all consumed by by Adam,Isaac Newton,Steve Jobs and you! (chronologically) :) lol –  Pratik Deoghare May 19 '10 at 13:56
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I could be wrong, but I think the reason it works when you change ArrayList to object is because string inherits from object and it decides to use the more specific string version. When it's string and ArrayList it doesn't know which one to use.

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null could represent either a string, or an ArrayList. There's no information there is to which version of the method (in this case a constructor) you meant.

You can force it to use a specific one by casting:

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        A o = new A((string)null);
    }

...or alternately implementing a constructor that behaves as you want (that takes no parameter)

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3  
An object could be null too, but the OP indicated that changing ArrayList to object resolves the issue; so this isn't the whole picture. The real issue is that in this case, neither type will "win" in the eyes of the compiler because one does not inherit from the other. In the case of string vs. object, string wins out because it derives from object and is therefore more specific. –  Dan Tao May 19 '10 at 12:34
1  
What about using object, you did not answer me –  Ahmed Said May 19 '10 at 12:37
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  1. Of course it's ambiguous: null could be either a string or an ArrayList. You'll need to qualify it, like (string) null.
  2. Did you know that ArrayList is deprecated? You should use one of the generic collection types instead
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For the ArrayList, it depends on the version of the Framework he uses, I guess. But good point for the null ambiguity. –  Will Marcouiller May 19 '10 at 12:31
    
@Will: if he's still using .NET 1.1, I'd tell him that .NET 1.1 has been deprecated. –  John Saunders May 19 '10 at 12:32
    
Hehehe... Right! =) But sometimes one has to deal with administrative decisions. If it's not broken, don't fix it! But yet, I get your point anyway. =) –  Will Marcouiller May 19 '10 at 12:38
    
I putted ArrayList as an example I am using .Net 3.5 –  Ahmed Said May 19 '10 at 12:40
    
ArrayList is a class you should no longer use. The direct replacement is List<object>. –  John Saunders May 19 '10 at 20:37
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you can tackle this situation by using default keyword like, and the code will be:

A o = new A(default(ArrayList)); 

Or

A o = new A(default(string)); 
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ArrayList and string are both nullable types. That confuses compiler.

If you have two constructors say one that takes nullable type e.g. ArrayList and other that takes non-nullable type e.g. int. The code will compile and choose the constructor with nullable type.

But if you have more that one constructor that takes nullable type then like @Dan Tao said it's apples and oranges: either can be null, but neither is more "specific" than the other.

for example:

class A
{
    public A(int x)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("string");
    }
    public A(ArrayList x)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ArrayList");
    }

}

This code compiles but if you change public A(int x)t to public A(int? x) it will NOT.

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It's not really to do with them being nullable\reference types, but rather that there is no 'best' option to choose between string and ArrayList. If you had a function with an overload taking a Stream, and one taking a MemoryStream and called it with null then the compiler would be able to resolve it. –  Lee May 19 '10 at 13:01
    
@Lee Thanks! But could you please explain how compiler resolves it in that case? –  Pratik Deoghare May 19 '10 at 13:52
    
This post from Eric Lippert explains overload resolution better than me - stackoverflow.com/questions/2856023/…. –  Lee May 19 '10 at 14:25
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