Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an object containing a date and a count.

 public class Stat
 {
    public DateTime Stamp {get; set;}
    public int Count {get; set ;}
 }

I have a Serie object that holds a list of thoses Stat plus some more info such as name and so on...

public class Serie
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public List<Stat> Data { get; set; }
    ...
}

Consider that I have a List of Serie but the series don't all contain the same Stamps. I need to fill in the missing stamps in all series with a default value.

I thought of an extension method with signature like this (please provide better name if you find one :) ) :

 public static IEnumerable<Serie> Equalize(this IEnumerable<ChartSerie> series, int defaultCount)

this question seems to treat the same problem, but when querying directly the DB. of course I could loop through the dates and create another list. But is there any more elegant way to achieve this?

i.e.:

Serie A:
01.05.2010 1
03.05.2010 3

Serie B:
01.05.2010 5
02.05.2010 6

I should get :

Serie A :
01.05.2010 1
02.05.2010 0
03.05.2010 3

Serie B:
01.05.2010 5
02.05.2010 6
03.05.2010 0

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Not sure if this is elegant enough for you ;-) but since I like Linq, this is what I would have done (using your naming scheme):

public static IEnumerable<Serie> Equalize(
    this IEnumerable<Serie> series,
    int defaultCount)
{
    var allStamps = series
        .SelectMany(s => s.Data.Select(d => d.Stamp))
        .Distinct()
        .OrderBy(d => d)
        .ToList();

    return series.Select(serie => new Serie(
        serie.Name,
        allStamps.Select(d =>
            serie.Data.FirstOrDefault(stat => stat.Stamp == d)
            ??
            new Stat(d, defaultCount))
        ));
}

For this code to compile, your classes needs a couple of constructors:

public class Stat
{
    public Stat() {}

    public Stat(DateTime stamp, int count)
    {
        Stamp = stamp;
        Count = count;
    }

    public DateTime Stamp { get; set; }
    public int Count { get; set; }
}

public class Serie
{
    public Serie() {}

    public Serie(string name, IEnumerable<Stat> data)
    {
        Name = name;
        Data = new List<Stat>(data);
    }

    public string Name { get; set; }
    public List<Stat> Data { get; set; }
}

When calling series.Equalize(0) the code above will leave the original instances intact, and return a sequence of newly created Serie-instances with their Data padded with defaults.

Nothing magic about it. Just the sweetness of Linq... (and the null coalescing operator!)

I haven't tried this with loads and loads of data, so your milage may vary.

share|improve this answer
    
I ended up with a similar solution. I am actually not so sure if linq is really helpful here. It makes it a bit more concise, but how easy is it to understand what that chain of method is doing. Anyway, thanks for the answer! –  Stephane May 24 '10 at 12:55
    
I fully agree with your concern. I'm thinking that the elegance might not be in the implementation of the Equalize method, but in the usage. How about sharing what you ended up with? –  Christoffer Lette May 24 '10 at 15:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.