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I want to search for a string in 10 files and write the matching lines to a single file. I wrote the matching lines from each file to 10 output files(o/p file1,o/p file2...) and then copied those to a single file using 10 threads.

But the output single file has mixed output(one line from o/p file1,another line from o/p file 2 etc...) because its accessed simultaneously by many threads. If I wait for all threads to complete and then write the single file it will be much slower. I want the output file to be written by one thread at a time. What should i do?

My source code:(only writing to single file method)

public void WriteSingle(File output_file,File final_output) throws IOException {
   synchronized(output_file){
       System.out.println("Writing Single file");
       FileOutputStream fo = new FileOutputStream(final_output,true);
       FileChannel fi = fo.getChannel();
       FileInputStream fs = new FileInputStream(output_file);
       FileChannel fc = fs.getChannel();
       int maxCount = (64 * 1024 * 1024) - (32 * 1024);
       long size = fc.size();
       long position = 0;
       while (position < size) {
           position += fc.transferTo(position, maxCount, fi);
       }
    }
}
share|improve this question
public synchronized void method() {

}

And be sure to flush() / close() all streams before you exist the method.

And, as noted in the comments by Xavier, make sure you are invoking the method on the same instance. Because synchronization happens per-instance (in this case)

share|improve this answer
    
I used that but its not working – geeta May 19 '10 at 14:43
3  
Did you used from a single instance of your object? – Xavier Combelle May 19 '10 at 14:47

If I understand this, you want to prevent two threads from writing to the same file?

The easiest way to do that is to lock the file itself, not the File object:

public void WriteSingle(File output_file, File final_output) throws IOException {
    System.out.println("Writing Single file");
    FileOutputStream fo = new FileOutputStream(final_output,true);
    FileChannel fi = fo.getChannel();
    FileInputStream fs = new FileInputStream(output_file);
    FileChannel fc = fs.getChannel();

    FileLock lock = fi.lock(); // Get lock here, blocks until file is closed

    fc.transferTo(0, fc.size(), fi);

    fc.close();
    fi.close();
    fo.close();
    fs.close();
}
share|improve this answer

Source code:

public void WriteSingle(File output_file,File final_output)
      throws IOException
  {
     synchronized(output_file){
        try{ 
            wait();
        }
        catch (InterruptedException e) { 
            e.printStackTrace(); 
        } 

     System.out.println("Writing Single file");
 FileOutputStream fo = new FileOutputStream(final_output,true);
     FileChannel fi = fo.getChannel();
     FileInputStream fs = new FileInputStream(output_file);
     FileChannel fc = fs.getChannel();
     int maxCount = (64 * 1024 * 1024) - (32 * 1024);
     long size = fc.size();
     long position = 0;
     while (position < size) {
       position += fc.transferTo(position, maxCount, fi);
     }
   }
share|improve this answer
    
put synchronized in the method declaration, not inside the method. – Dean J May 19 '10 at 14:44
    
I changed code as per your suggestion, but the file is not written also the program never ends.... – geeta May 19 '10 at 14:58
1  
It will never end because Dean's answer is just wrong. When you wait the thread will suspend itself and wont be wake up until another thread notifies the object. So your program will continue to run for ever. – John Vint May 19 '10 at 17:27

What about having a file writer class with lock (i.e. obtain lock on the instance, perform whatever write is necessary, then release the lock; somewhat like database transactions)? Consider passing the instance of the file writer to the objects/methods that need to execute the writes (with additional benefit of easier unit testing/mocking).

share|improve this answer
public synchronized void WriteSingle(File output_file,File final_output) throws IOException {
       System.out.println("Writing Single file");
       FileOutputStream fo = new FileOutputStream(final_output,true);
       FileChannel fi = fo.getChannel();
       FileInputStream fs = new FileInputStream(output_file);
       FileChannel fc = fs.getChannel();
       int maxCount = (64 * 1024 * 1024) - (32 * 1024);
       long size = fc.size();
       long position = 0;
       while (position < size) {
           position += fc.transferTo(position, maxCount, fi);
       }
}

If that doesn't work, then you may be using multiple instances to write to the file. In this case, you could try a class lock like this:

public void WriteSingle(File output_file,File final_output) throws IOException {
    synchronized(getClass()) {
       System.out.println("Writing Single file");
       FileOutputStream fo = new FileOutputStream(final_output,true);
       FileChannel fi = fo.getChannel();
       FileInputStream fs = new FileInputStream(output_file);
       FileChannel fc = fs.getChannel();
       int maxCount = (64 * 1024 * 1024) - (32 * 1024);
       long size = fc.size();
       long position = 0;
       while (position < size) {
           position += fc.transferTo(position, maxCount, fi);
       }
    }
}

This isn't ideal, but it should give us a hint about what your code is doing.

If neither of these work, then your general programming logic is probably wrong and the problem may have little to do with synchronization.

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