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In Excel we have the VLOOKUP function that looks for a value in a column in a table and then returns a value from a given column in that table if it finds something. If it doesn't, it produces an error.

Is there a function that just returns true or false depending on if the value was found in a column or not?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could wrap your VLOOKUP() in an IFERROR()

Edit: before Excel 2007, use =IF(ISERROR()...)

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I think you mean IFERROR() –  Bradley Mountford May 19 '10 at 14:55
    
mea culpa - mea mistypo –  Mark Baker May 19 '10 at 14:55
    
Thanks for the edit BradC, I missed the Excel2003 tag –  Mark Baker May 19 '10 at 15:04
1  
So I'd just do =IF(ISERROR(); "not found"; "found") or something like that? –  Svish May 19 '10 at 18:43
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Or even =IF(ISERROR(Vlookup(...)),FALSE,TRUE) to give the True/False of your original request –  Mark Baker May 19 '10 at 21:00

You still have to wrap it in an ISERROR, but you could use MATCH() instead of VLOOKUP():

Returns the relative position of an item in an array that matches a specified value in a specified order. Use MATCH instead of one of the LOOKUP functions when you need the position of an item in a range instead of the item itself.

Here's a complete example, assuming you're looking for the word "key" in a range of cells:

=IF(ISERROR(MATCH("key",A5:A16,FALSE)),"missing","found")

The FALSE is necessary to force an exact match, otherwise it will look for the closest value.

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Just use a COUNTIF ! Much faster to write and calculate than the other suggestions.


EDIT:

Say you cell A1 should be 1 if the value of B1 is found in column C and otherwise it should be 2. How would you do that?

I would say if the value of B1 is found in column C, then A1 will be positive, otherwise it will be 0. Thats easily done with formula: =COUNTIF($C$1:$C$15,B1), which means: count the cells in range C1:C15 which are equal to B1.

You can combine COUNTIF with VLOOKUP and IF, and that's MUCH faster than using 2 lookups + ISNA. IF(COUNTIF(..)>0,LOOKUP(..),"Not found")

A bit of Googling will bring you tons of examples.

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Could you give an easy example? Say you cell A1 should be 1 if the value of B1 is found in column C and otherwise it should be 2. How would you do that? –  Svish May 25 '10 at 17:37
    
The question was is there a function that just returns true or false depending on if the value was found in a column or not?. To which COUNTIF is the simplest answer. +1 –  brettdj Jan 24 at 2:58

We've always used an

if(iserror(vlookup,"n/a",vlookup))

Excel 2007 introduced IfError which allows you to do the vlookup and add output in case of error, but that doesn't help you with 2003...

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No it doesn't :p –  Svish May 19 '10 at 18:44
    
So close to a -1 .... OP was clear this question was meant for xl2003 –  brettdj Jan 24 at 2:59
    
except that my answer is for xl2003, with some additional information about xl2007 –  Dave Arkell Jan 27 at 15:38

You can use:

=IF(ISERROR(VLOOKUP(lookup value,table array,column no,FALSE)),"FALSE","TRUE")
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-1 for providing the same approach as an existing answer - 3 years afterwards. –  brettdj Jan 24 at 3:01

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