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I need to create a hash table that has a key as a string, and value as an int. I cannot use STL containers on my target. Is there a suitable hash table class for this purpose?

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3  
What can you use? Are you looking for tips on implementing a hashtable or alternate existing implementations? –  JSBձոգչ May 19 '10 at 15:23
    
You'd better have a spectacularly good reason to not use the STL. Is this a homework assignment maybe? –  AshleysBrain May 19 '10 at 15:29
1  
The word target implies some sort of embedded system to me. –  Mark B May 19 '10 at 15:45
    
@^%#@%^!# - I had coded out a nice little hash add / remove function without templates for this guy and the website glitched and killed all my code. Lame! Lame! –  Michael Dorgan May 19 '10 at 16:18
    
@Michael: Firefox + TextArea Cache. –  Mark Rushakoff May 19 '10 at 16:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a quick a dirty C hash I just wrote. Compiles, but untested locally. Still, the idea is there for you to run with it as needed. The performance of this is completely dependant upon the keyToHash function. My version will not be high performance, but again demonstrates how to do it.


static const int kMaxKeyLength = 31;
static const int kMaxKeyStringLength = kMaxKeyLength + 1;

struct HashEntry
{
  int value;
  char key[kMaxKeyLength];
};

static const char kEmptyHash[2] = "";

static const int kHashPowerofTwo = 10;
static const int kHashSize = 1 << kHashPowerofTwo;
static const int kHashMask = kHashSize - 1;

static const int kSmallPrimeNumber = 7;

static HashEntry hashTable[kHashSize];

int keyToHash(const char key[])
{
  assert(strlen(key) < kMaxKeyLength);

  int hashValue = 0;
  for(int i=0; < strlen(key); i++)
  {
    hashValue += key[i];
  }

  return hashValue;
}

bool hashAdd(const char key[], const int value)
{
  int hashValue = keyToHash(key);

  int hashFullSentinal = 0;
  while(strcmp(hashTable[hashValue & kHashMask].key, kEmptyHash))
  {
    hashValue += kSmallPrimeNumber;

    if(hashFullSentinal++ >= (kHashSize - 1))
    {
      return false;
    }
  }

  strcpy(hashTable[hashValue & kHashMask].key, key);
  hashTable[hashValue & kHashMask].value = value;

  return true;
}   

bool hashFind(const char key[], int *value)
{
  int hashValue = keyToHash(key);

  while(strcmp(hashTable[hashValue & kHashMask].key, kEmptyHash))
  {
    if(!strcmp(hashTable[hashValue & kHashMask].key, key))
    {
      *value = hashTable[hashValue & kHashMask].value;
      return true;
    }
  }

  return false;
}

bool hashRemove(const char key[])
{
  int hashValue = keyToHash(key);

  while(strcmp(hashTable[hashValue & kHashMask].key, kEmptyHash))
  {
    if(!strcmp(hashTable[hashValue & kHashMask].key, key))
    {
      hashTable[hashValue & kHashMask].value = 0;
      hashTable[hashValue & kHashMask].key[0] = 0;
      return true;
    }
  }

  return false;
}

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In the case that you know your list of keys ahead of time (or some superset thereof), you can use a perfect hash function generator like gperf. gperf will spit out either C or C++ code.

(You may need to do some work to actually build a container, given the hash function, though.)

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You can use the unordered associative container from Boost, aka. boost::unordered_map, which is implemented in terms of a hash table.

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although it would be interesting what the poster's opposition to STL is. If it is the fact that templates are used then boost is out as well. –  mjmarsh May 19 '10 at 15:25
1  
@mjmarsh: True but in that case a lot more information would have been helpful. Even excluding the STL is an unreasonable request as far as I am concerned but since no other restrictions were mentioned, I think using the Boost libraries are probably the obvious choice. –  Konrad Rudolph May 19 '10 at 15:28

It's a moot point since STL has no hash table container; std::map would be the alternative. For most purposes there is no reason not to use std::map. For uses that require a hashtable, boost::unordered_map is the best choice (and I think matches the hashtable defined in the new C++ TR1 proposed standard. Some compilers -- but I can't name them -- may provide the TR1 hashtable as std::tr1::unordered_map

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You might want to check out glib hash tables
http://library.gnome.org/devel/glib/stable/glib-Hash-Tables.html

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If you need maximum performance, use MCT's closed_hash_map or Google's dense_hash_map. The former is easier to use, the latter is more mature. Your use case sounds like it would benefit from closed hashing.

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