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The attached simple Java code should load all available cpu core when starting it with the right parameters. So for instance, you start it with

java VMTest 8 int 0

and it will start 8 threads that do nothing else than looping and adding 2 to an integer. Something that runs in registers and not even allocates new memory.

The problem we are facing now is, that we do not get a 24 core machine loaded (AMD 2 sockets with 12 cores each), when running this simple program (with 24 threads of course). Similar things happen with 2 programs each 12 threads or smaller machines.

So our suspicion is that the JVM (Sun JDK 6u20 on Linux x64) does not scale well.

Did anyone see similar things or has the ability to run it and report whether or not it runs well on his/her machine (>= 8 cores only please)? Ideas?

I tried that on Amazon EC2 with 8 cores too, but the virtual machine seems to run different from a real box, so the loading behaves totally strange.

package com.test;

import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;
import java.util.concurrent.Future;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

public class VMTest
{
    public class IntTask implements Runnable 
    {
        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            int i = 0;

            while (true)
            {
                i = i + 2;
            }
        }
    }
    public class StringTask implements Runnable 
    {
        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            int i = 0;

            String s;
            while (true)
            {
                i++;
                s = "s" + Integer.valueOf(i);
            }
        }
    }
    public class ArrayTask implements Runnable 
    {
        private final int size; 
        public ArrayTask(int size)
        {
            this.size = size;
        }
        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            int i = 0;

            String[] s;
            while (true)
            {
                i++;
                s = new String[size];
            }
        }
    }

    public void doIt(String[] args) throws InterruptedException
    {
        final String command = args[1].trim();

        ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(Integer.valueOf(args[0]));
        for (int i = 0; i < Integer.valueOf(args[0]); i++)
        {
            Runnable runnable = null;
            if (command.equalsIgnoreCase("int"))
            {
                runnable = new IntTask();
            }
            else if (command.equalsIgnoreCase("string"))
            {
                runnable = new StringTask();
            }
            Future<?> submit = executor.submit(runnable);
        }
        executor.awaitTermination(1, TimeUnit.HOURS);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException
    {
        if (args.length < 3)
        {
            System.err.println("Usage: VMTest threadCount taskDef size");
            System.err.println("threadCount: Number 1..n");
            System.err.println("taskDef: int string array");
            System.err.println("size: size of memory allocation for array, ");
            System.exit(-1);
        }

        new VMTest().doIt(args);
    }
}
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Additional information. Just found out that the 64bit version of the JDK loads the cores way better (about 90%) than the 32bit version (about 45%). Which is strange, because the OS and the AMD cpu support 32bit and I do not run any memory operations during that test. –  ReneS May 19 '10 at 16:27
1  
Just for understanding - why do you not use the invokeAll(..) method? And why don't you use callables, as far as i know, runnable is not part of the java.concurrent? –  InsertNickHere May 19 '10 at 16:28
    
You should also watch for other running processes. Did you make a "clean" run, with no other progamms/processes taking cpu time? –  InsertNickHere May 19 '10 at 17:02
    
How well does your native version of the "int" task load the cores? And what is the difference between "string"/"int"? Post some summary numbers? –  Justin May 19 '10 at 17:48
    
@InsertNickHere: Just wanted to write the code fast to load the cpus using Java. Just to prove a theory. And yes, it was a clean run. @Justin: I do not have a native version. It is about checking whether or not Java can deal with the core in theory and with the simplest code. –  ReneS May 19 '10 at 20:29

5 Answers 5

I don't see anything wrong with your code.

However, unfortunately, you can't specify the processor affinity in Java. So, this is actually left up to the OS, not the JVM. It's all about how your OS handles threads.

You could split your Java threads into separate processes and wrap them up in native code, to put one process per core. This does, of course, complicate communication, as it will be inter-process rather than inter-thread. Anyway, this is how popular grid computing applications like boink work.

Otherwise, you're at the mercy of the OS to schedule the threads.

share|improve this answer
    
This was not the question and running 2 VMs with less threads does not change the game that much. –  ReneS May 19 '10 at 16:25
    
How about running one JVM per core, with two threads each? You might want to change your question because I answered "Why does this Java code not utilize all CPU cores?" –  Marcus Adams May 19 '10 at 16:42
    
Sorry about the misunderstanding, but the question is: "... THIS Java code...". It is simple, no locking, no synchronization, no memory allocation and still not 100% cpu usage. This should create X concurrent and independent threads. –  ReneS May 19 '10 at 20:38

I would guess this is inherent to the JVM/OS and not necessarily your code. Check the various JVM performance tuning docs from Sun, e.g. http://ch.sun.com/sunnews/events/2009/apr/adworkshop/pdf/5-1-Java-Performance.pdf which suggests using numactl on Linux to set the affinity.

Good luck!

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This option should resolve the afinity problem (if implemented) –  Justin May 19 '10 at 18:36
    
Thanks for the hint to slides and program. Will try that. –  ReneS May 19 '10 at 20:35
    
Seems to do some stuff, but it is tricky. There are additional flags such as -XX:+UseTLAB and -XX:+UseNUMA that can be applied to the VM to work with the underlying architecture better. –  ReneS May 21 '10 at 11:24

uname -a 2.6.18-194.11.4.el5 #1 SMP Tue Sep 21 05:04:09 EDT 2010 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5530 @ 2.40GHz http://browse.geekbench.ca/geekbench2/view/182101

Java 1.6.0_20-b02

16cores, the program consumed 100% cpu as shown by vmstat

Interestingly I came to this article because I am suspecting my application is not utilizing all the cores as the cpu utilisation never increases but the response time starts deteriorating

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I've noticed even on C that a tight loop often has issues like that. You'll also see pretty vast differences depending on OS.

Depending on the reporting tool you are using, it may not report the CPU used by some core services.

Java tends to be pretty friendly. You might try the same thing in linux but set the process priority to some negative number and see how it acts.

Setting thread priorities inside the app may help a little too if your jvm isn't using green threads.

Lots of variables.

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1  
Thanks, but no VM is using green threads anymore at least not to my knowledge on typical platforms such as Windows, Linux, Solaris, MacOS. –  ReneS May 19 '10 at 20:30
    
@ReneS Over the last few years I've worked on Java embedded in cable boxes and spectrum analyzers--I make few assumptions like that--I was just saying that there was a lot to consider. –  Bill K May 19 '10 at 20:45
    
No problem and thanks for your comment, just have never seen green threads in my Java world for ages. –  ReneS May 21 '10 at 11:25

Apparently your VM is running in so-called "client" mode, where all Java threads are mapped to one native OS thread and consequently are run by one single CPU core. Try to invoke the JVM with -server switch, this should correct the problem.

If you get an: Error: no 'server' JVM found, you'll have to copy the server directory from a JDK's jre\bin directory to JRE's bin.

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