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When person 1 become partner with person 3, person 2 should no longer have person 1 as partner and person 4 should no longer have person 3 as partner. How should I solve this?

public class Person {

    private String name;
    private Person partner;

    public Person(String name){
        this.name = name;
    }

    public void setPartner(Person partner){
        this.partner = partner;
        partner.partner = this; 
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Person one = new Person("1");           
        Person two = new Person("2");
        Person three = new Person("3");
        Person four = new Person("4");

        one.setPartner(two);
        three.setPartner(four);

        one.setPartner(three);

        //Person two is still partner with person 1
        //and person four is still partner with person 3 
   }
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7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted
public void setPartner(Partner b) {
  // Special case, otherwise we'll have troubles
  // when this.partner is already b.
  if (this.partner == b) return;

  if (this.partner != null) {
    this.partner.partner = null;
  }

  this.partner = b;

  // Make sure that the new partner has the right partner.
  // This will make sure the original b.partner has its
  // partner field nullified.
  // Note that if we don't have the special case above,
  // this will be an infinite recursion.
  b.setPartner(this);
}
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you said: this.partner.partner = null; but the partner is a PRIVATE field... please fix it with a set/get methods –  Leni Kirilov May 19 '10 at 17:43
    
Actually, since they are the same class Java will allow you to manipulate a PRIVATE field from another instance of the same class--strange but true. Not that it's a great idea, but in this case it might be another way to avoid the ugly recursion that @Ablaeul hit. (This solution also avoids it nicely) –  Bill K May 19 '10 at 17:58
    
@Leni I would have loved to use setPartner too, but it's just not possible without creating another helper method (like removePartner). Calling setPartner(null) on the original partner will cause havoc. Anyway, like Bill said, we can access private field as long as it is the same class, no need to be the same object. –  Chris Henry May 20 '10 at 0:55
    
This private.private is strange to me. I didn't know it works. I will dig through the books/specs why this is made, because I can't see an obvious reason. –  Leni Kirilov May 20 '10 at 10:48

I think putting this as the first line in setPartner should work: this.partner.partner = null;

Of course you must check if this.partner is null or not.

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public void setPartner(Person partner){
    if (this.partner != null) {
        this.partner.partner = null; // Reset the partner of the old partner.
    }
    this.partner = partner;          // Assign new partner.
    this.partner.partner = this;     // Set the partner of the new partner.
}
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OMG and partnership:) 8 occurences of partner here:) –  Petar Minchev May 19 '10 at 16:11
2  
...not counting the comments. –  BalusC May 19 '10 at 16:15
    
@BalusC Good point, I missed that:) –  Petar Minchev May 19 '10 at 16:16
    
In this case, the original this.partner.partner.partner (oh yeah, that's even more partners), will still be set to this.partner.partner, won't it? –  Chris Henry May 19 '10 at 16:24
    
You would make it much more clear if you had used newPartner instead of reusing the term partner. Would have also, as a side effect, allowed you to remove those unnecessary, hard to read "this." –  Bill K May 19 '10 at 16:26

change setPartner to:

public void setPartner(Person partner){
    if(this.partner != null)
        this.partner.partner = null;
    this.partner = partner;
    partner.partner = this; 
}
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I would suggest that you set up a setRelationship method, which would action setPartner on the current Person, and action a new removePartner on the old partner, if not null.

The new setRelationship method would be in place so that there would be no confusion as to what setPartner does - there would be no side-effects that might be missed by the unsuspecting programmer.

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1  
I've never seen "action" used as a verb like that. Is there any subtle difference to "call" that I'm not aware of? –  Joachim Sauer May 19 '10 at 16:13
    
No, just trying to spice it up a bit. I can replace 'action' with 'call' if you'd like. –  akf May 19 '10 at 16:15
    
+1 because the setPartner() doesn't document that it does any additional methods and logics. How am I supposed to know as a user thta the setPartner() will calculate PI ? Should be made more visible whate exactly is happening –  Leni Kirilov May 19 '10 at 17:42

Here is my Code:

public void setPartner(Person partner) {
    if (this.partner != null)
       this.partner.partner = null;
    this.partner = partner;
    if (partner.partner != null)
       partner.partner.partner = null;
    partner.partner = this;
}
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class Person {

  String name;
  Partnership partnership;
  void setPartnership(Partnership p) {
    partnership=p;
  }
}
class Partnership {
  Person partner1;
  Person partner2;
  public setPartners(Person p1,Person p2) {
    p1.setPartnership(this);
    p2.setPartnership(this);
}

Ideally you would want a way to prevent setPartnership being called from anywhere other than Partnership.

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