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My method which calls SQL Server returns a DataReader but because of what I need to do - which is return the DataReader to the calling method which resides in a page code-behind - I can't close the connection in the class of the method which calls SQL server. Due to this, I have no finally or using blocks.

Is the correct way of disposing resources to make the class implement IDisposable? Alternatively should I explicitly dispose the unmanaged resource (class-level fields) from the caller?

EDIT: I send the datareader back because I need to bind specific data from the datareader to a listitem control, so in the calling class (Codebehind page), I do:

 new ListItem(datareader["dc"]); (along those lines).
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9  
Why do you want to send the data reader to the page? –  Perpetualcoder May 19 '10 at 16:57
    
Returning the DataReader directly may be bad practice, but it may be useful for him in some cases. –  Venemo May 19 '10 at 17:04
    
@Venemo - I think stackoverflow.com/questions/2867661/… might serve him better. –  dss539 May 19 '10 at 21:25
    
@dss539 - Perhaps, but his question is not about what might serve him better. (Personally, I think an ORM would serve him better than using DataReaders.) –  Venemo May 19 '10 at 21:35

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I would say yes, implement IDisposable. One of the main reasons as far as I can tell to use it is when you cannot trust the user of the object enough to do it properly themselves. This seems to be a prime candidate for that.

This being said however, there is a question to your architecture. Why is it that you want to send the DataReader itself to the page instead of calling a method to do it for you (including the relevant cleanup) by returning what is necessary? If it necessary to give the actual reader to the page, then so be it.

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Holding the database connection as a member variable in your reader class and making your reader class implement IDisposable seems fine to me.

However, you might consider making your method return IEnumerable and using yield return statements to walk through the data reader. That way you can return the results and still clean up from within your method.

Here's a rough sketch of what I mean:

public IEnumerable<Person> ReadPeople(string name)
{
    using (var reader = OpenReader(...))
    {
        // loop through the reader and create Person objects
        for ...
        {
            var person = new Person();
            ...
            yield return person;
        }
    }
}
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... or alternatively, "public IEnumerable<IDataRecord>" with "yield return reader;" and leave it up to the caller how to process the data. –  Joe May 19 '10 at 17:22
    
I've done very similar in the past. I genericised it down to a class that just encapsulated the connection and the reader together - but you could cascade them (so you can still have multiple readers). Worked quite nicely –  philsquared May 19 '10 at 17:30

Yes you should implement IDisposable on your custom class if it contains a DataReader that is open when returned to a lower layer.

It is the accepted pattern when returning something, that needs to be cleaned up.

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First, passing the DataReader may not really be what you want to do, but I'll assume that it is.

The proper way to handle this would be to pass back a composite type that either encapsulates or exposes the DataReader and holds on to the connection, then implement IDisposable on that type. When disposing of that type, dispose both the reader and the connection.

public class YourClass : IDisposable
{
    private IDbConnection connection;
    private IDataReader reader;

    public IDataReader Reader { get { return reader; } }

    public YourClass(IDbConnection connection, IDataReader reader)
    {
        this.connection = connection;
        this.reader = reader;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        reader.Dispose();
        connection.Dispose();
    }
}
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Your class

class MyClass : IDisposable
{
  protected List<DataReader> _readers = new List<DataReader>();
  public DataReader MyFunc()
  {
      ///... code to do stuff

      _readers.Add(myReader);
      return myReader;
  }
  private void Dispose()
  {
      for (int i = _readers.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
      {
          DataReader dr = _reader.Remove(i);
          dr.Dispose();
      }
      _readers = null;

      // Dispose / Close Connection
  }
}

Then outside your class

public void FunctionThatUsesMyClass()
{
   using(MyClass c = new MyClass())
   {
       DataReader dr = c.MyFunc();
   }
}

All the readers and the MyClass instance get cleaned up when the using block exits.

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Why bother removing them from the _readers variable? And setting it = null won't actually do anything. –  Adam Robinson May 19 '10 at 17:01
    
Removing them from _readers is a great way to de-reference them, basically telling the GC that it may clean them up. –  Venemo May 19 '10 at 17:07
    
_readers = null was just out of habit. You don't need it because when the MyClass object is GC'ed, so will the empty List. Removing them from the _readers object reduces the reference count and will aid in Garbage Collection, eventually the GC will realize the only references to them are from pending objects for collection, but it can't hurt. –  Aren May 19 '10 at 17:10
    
@Venemo: Doing that will have no effect unless the consumer holds on to MyClass after calling Dispose. Even in such a case, it's highly unlikely that the GC will actually collect them before the object does fall out of scope. It's unnecessary work. –  Adam Robinson May 19 '10 at 17:10
    
@Aren: The GC does not use reference counting. You're right that it can't hurt (though the current implementation will throw an exception if Dispose is called more than once), but my point is that it's additional code (and thus something additional to look at and maintain) that doesn't actually get you anything. –  Adam Robinson May 19 '10 at 17:12

I wouldn't return anything. Instead, I would pass a delegate.

For example:

void FetchMeSomeReader(Action<IDataReader> useReader)
{
    using(var reader = WhateverYouDoToMakeTheReader())
        useReader(reader);
}

Then in your calling class:

void Whatever()
{
   FetchMeSomeReader(SetFields);
}

void SetFields(IDataReader reader)
{
   MyListItem = new ListItem(datareader["dc"]);
}
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The general rule is that your class should implement IDisposable if it directly holds unmanaged resources or holds a reference to another IDisposable object. If your class creates an IDataReader in one method but never holds that reference then your class would not need to implement IDisposable per the rule (unless it just happens to hold an IDisposable aside from the IDataReader created in that one method).

The real question you need to ask yourself is whether your class really should be holding onto that IDataReader even after it has delivered it to the caller. Personally, I think that is a poor design because it blurs the line of ownership. Who actually owns the IDisposable in that case? Who is responsible for its lifetime? Take the IDbCommand classes for example. They create IDataReader instances and return them to the callers, but absolve themselves of ownership. That makes the API clean and the responsibility for lifetime management is unambiguous in that case.

Regardless of the ownership issue your specific situation necessitates implementing IDisposable; not because your class happens to create and return an IDataReader instance, but because it sounds like it holds an IDbConnection object.

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