Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to check the value of extracted data against a csv I already have. It will only loop through the rows of the CSV once, I can only check one value of feed.items(). Is there a value I need to reset somewhere? Is there a better/more efficient way to do this? Thanks.

orig = csv.reader(open("googlel.csv", "rb"), delimiter = ';')
goodrows = []
for feed in gotfeeds:    
   for link,comments in feed.items():
       for row in orig:
           print link
           if link in row[1]:
               row.append(comments)
               goodrows.append(row)
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You can "reset" the CSV iterator by resetting the read position of the file object.

data = open("googlel.csv", "rb")
orig = csv.reader(data, delimiter = ';')
goodrows = []
for feed in gotfeeds:    
   for link,comments in feed.items():
       data.seek(0)
       for row in orig:
           print link
           if link in row[1]:
               row.append(comments)
               goodrows.append(row)
share|improve this answer
    
Works great, thanks. My file is small for the near future, but I would hate having to track down why it's slow in a couple months. –  matt May 20 '10 at 0:27

Making orig a list avoids the need to reset/reparse the csv:

orig = list(csv.reader(open("googlel.csv", "rb"), delimiter = ';'))
share|improve this answer
4  
This will technically work, but will cause the entire CSV file to be loaded into memory. Not a huge problem if the file's small, but this won't scale. –  Cerin May 19 '10 at 19:00
    
@Chris. True. If the csv file is huge, I'd expect him to mention that in the question, but there is certainly room for both our interpretations. –  unutbu May 19 '10 at 19:16
    
I agree with Chris S. We faced the same problem .. eventually our CSV files got up to 5gb a piece. Needless to say, it was a nightmare –  dassouki May 19 '10 at 19:54
1  
There is a tradeoff between speed and space. If you have the space, using a list will be faster because there will be no re-parsing of the csv. This is not a matter of which method is better, but rather which method is more appropriate for the OP's situation. Since he didn't explain how big is the CSV, either method might be more appropriate. –  unutbu May 19 '10 at 20:08
1  
In my experience, it's better to plan for scalability, then assume it's not necessary. In this case, making it scalable won't slow it down very much either, as the CSV parsing is fairly simple. –  Cerin May 20 '10 at 14:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.