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we are a distributed team working on the object database db4o.

The way we work:

  • We try to program in pairs only.
  • We use Skype and VNC or SharedView to connect and work together.
  • In our online Tuesday meeting every week (usually about 1 hour)
    • we talk about the tasks done last week
    • we create new pairs for the next week with a random generator so knowledge and friendship distribute evenly
    • we set the priority for any new tasks or bugs that have come in
    • each team picks the tasks it likes to do from the highest prioritized ones.
  • From Tuesday to Wednesday we estimate tasks. We have a unit of work we call "Ideal Developer Session" (IDS), maybe 2 or 3 hours of working together as a pair. It's not perfectly well defined (because we know estimation always is inaccurate) but from our past shared experience we have a common sense of what an IDS is. If we can't estimate a task because it feels too long for a week we break it down into estimatable smaller tasks.
  • During a short meeting on Wednesday we commit to a workload we feel is well doable in a week. We commit to complete.
  • If a team runs out of committed tasks during the week, it can pick new ones from the prioritized queue we have in Jira.

When we started working this way, some of us found that remote pair programming takes a lot of energy because you are so focussed. If you pair program for more than 5 or 6 hours per day, you get drained. On the other hand working like this has turned out to be very efficient. The knowledge about our codebase is evenly distributed and we have really learnt lots from eachother.

I would be very interested to hear about the experiences from other teams working in a similar way. Things like:

How often do you meet?
Have you tried different sprint lengths (one week, two week, longer) ?
Which tools do you use?
Which issue tracker do you use?
What do you do about time zone differences?
How does it work for you to integrate new people into the team?
How many hours do you usually work per week?
How does your management interact with the way you are working?
Do you get put on a waterfall with hard deadlines?
What's your unit of work?
What is your normal velocity? (units of work done per week)

Programming work should be fun and for us it usually is great fun.

I would be happy about any new ideas how to make it even more fun and/or more efficient.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Kevin Reid, Residuum, Divi, Yuliam Chandra, halfelf Sep 9 '14 at 3:59

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Nice topic, but it should be a community wiki. – Adam Crossland May 19 '10 at 19:25

@Carl: I can't answer all your questions, but I can put in my two cents WRT a few issues.

  • Usage of Skype is essential. Putting faces to internet aliases makes for a more friendly (therefore, productive) work environment. When I worked with a offsite team, there was a lot of offline complaining about the offsite team.
  • Daily meetings, even for 15 minutes, are very helpful. Devote five-ten minutes to people just talking about whatever they want to talk, whether it's their weekend, kids, etc. People will talk about this kind of stuff anyway, and being able to do it in a public forum allows for greater team cohesion, which means less complaining about the other team members (see above). (NOTE: This isn't my idea. I got it from Giuliani's book Leadership).
  • About pair programming: if the team members like it, then perfect! Sometimes people don't like it but don't speak up because of fear of team retribution or offending somebody. Silently disgruntled team members are awful for morale.

P.S. Great work on db4o!

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We use Microsoft Sharepoint server as a central information space. We have all design documents, meeting notes, job scheduling, pretty much all the business side of the house on that server. We also have cams on our desktops and we are encouraged to video call each other whenever we need to. It's not a scheduled thing it's just a quick video chat, no formalities, just a quick text message, "Hey can you video chat?"

We do tend to use lots of different chat software from AOL to MSN so I use Trillian to let me talk to everyone. We also all have company Skype accounts we use a lot. It's actually easier than the phone since our phones go thru our computers any way so our headsets are hooked up to them.

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How often do you meet?

Daily (usually first thing in the morning), and whenever necessary to remove roadblocks. Pairing only when necessary to solve complex problems - or early in test development.

Have you tried different sprint lengths (one week, two week, longer) ?

Yes, but this always depends on customer-provided priorities and delivery schedules first. We respond to their requirements, not make up our own. Sometimes spikes play into this, as it is impossible to avert dependency loops.

Which tools do you use?

Pivotal Tracker and Rally. Have been forced to use TeamForge, which sucks. I really like Campfire and it seems to do the trick for my teams.

Which issue tracker do you use?

Depends on the project, but usually something that is web-based at a minimum.

What do you do about time zone differences?

Deal with it. Most of my projects are spread around the world, somebody is going to get screwed - it usually is me.

How does it work for you to integrate new people into the team?

Depends on the team, and the newbie. Some teams are more accepting than others, and some newbies are better at integrating. There should always be respect, period.

How many hours do you usually work per week?

40+ - the plus usually is due to multiple projects - pro and personal.

How does your management interact with the way you are working?

Hands-off. But, sometimes things get tense. Just takes good communication, and transparency is always better.

Do you get put on a waterfall with hard deadlines?

Sure! Even within Agile projects. Customers are demanding.

What's your unit of work?

Depends on the project of course. Usually time for me and my teams. Deliverables go with everything, but we usually have up-stream projects to support too.

What is your normal velocity? (units of work done per week)

There is no normal. Complexity, team, customer all play in as rough variables. The biggest problem is usually team maturity.

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Our Agile project management tool is Greenhopper on top of Jira. For desktop sharing we use Shared View, but for show & tell purposes, rather than pair programming. Skype is the main communication tool, but with gtalk for IM. Skype's a bit flaky when it comes to sending IM messages. I wrote a post about all the tools we use for distributed development in our company

Our sprints are week long, we used to have larger sprints, but this works well. On mondays we look back at what's been achieved in the previous sprint and carry over any outstanding work. We then add backlog stories (with estimates) to pad out about a weeks worth of work for the current sprint. There's a backlog for the current minor version and a general 'catchall' backlog.

The stories are quite minimalist, and the estimates are quick and dirty (although fairly accurate typically). They progress through 'Todo' -> 'In progress' -> 'Resolved' -> 'Done'. Stories are moved into a 'Done' state when discussed in the weekly monday meetings.

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I was also once involved in project and we practised XP. I found Pivotal Tracker very good for planning and user stories. I would also advise you to look an BitBucket. We found is useful when used it together with mercurial distributed version control as I believe it's very suitable for distributed team.

I have also noticed that XP does not work well in an academic environment(students). Practices such as 40 hours per week and pair programming didn't work well. I was a project assessor on teams that were using XP methodology.

Overall, Agile development is good and I think is much suitable for small projects. Can work for big projects too, but will need to use the divide-and-conquer using small teams.

Integrating new people is fair easy so long as they start with an iteration or get paired with someone who has a fair idea on the already developed features.

Other things like TDD proved helpful.

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How often do you meet?

Every two days, and depending on the urgency, increase to daily short meetings

Have you tried different sprint lengths (one week, two week, longer) ?

Stick with two week sprint lengths

Which tools do you use?

Collaboration tools are essential. Communication: Mobile phone. Document sharing/idea sharing/knowledge sharing: a wiki or forum. There are a number of platforms: IGLOO, JiveSoftware, Leverage Software are all fairly easy to use

Which issue tracker do you use?

This is typically built in to collaboration software

What do you do about time zone differences?

Calendars and countdowns keep people working in their time-block, meetings are adjusted such that even if we can't get everybody to meet at exactly the same time, meetings are made such that A meet B, B meet C (tells C about AB meeting), C meet A (tells A about BC meeting), continue and follow up in emails. This works smoothly among small teams in different time zones

How does it work for you to integrate new people into the team?

Start them on something small to get used to the system, and challenge them enough to learn as much as possible.

How many hours do you usually work per week?

40+ typically

How does your management interact with the way you are working?

A flat hierarchy is used - Management works with the employees, acting more of a guidance than boss. This would prevent stifling creativity and in general improve happiness

Do you get put on a waterfall with hard deadlines?

No. Waterfall methodology is rare, and happens only with small projects that lasts 3 or 4 days at most.

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