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I have a list of n logos to display in a grid, with a maximum of 3 per row. What's an algorithm to decide how many to display per row such that the number of logos per row is as balanced as possible without using more than the minimum possible number of rows?

For example:

 n -> number in each row
 1 -> 1
 2 -> 2
 3 -> 3
 4 -> 2, 2
 5 -> 3, 2
 6 -> 3, 3
 7 -> 3, 2, 2
 8 -> 3, 3, 2
 9 -> 3, 3, 3
10 -> 3, 3, 2, 2
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2  
you're requirements are...missing. Are we supposed to break down the number into smaller parts? By what rules? –  Michael Haren May 19 '10 at 19:25
    
Are you trying to print the possible ways to express your number as a sum? You know there are an infinite number of ways to do that, right? –  Seth May 19 '10 at 19:26
    
the numbers to the right of the arrow sum to the number from the left. I think he means "if I have 8 logos to display, I want 2 rows of 3 (max 3 in a line) and then I want the remaining 2 on the last line. But if there are 4, I want a balanced presentation of 2x2." –  Heath Hunnicutt May 19 '10 at 19:28
1  
he wants to bin set into subsets of at most three elements, with a slight twist to ensure bins are balanced (in case of 4) –  Anycorn May 19 '10 at 19:29
1  
It looks like they want no orphans. Ie: no rows with only 1 logo –  Dinah May 19 '10 at 19:31

4 Answers 4

  • For N <= 3 just use N.
  • If N is exactly divisible by 3 then use: 3 3 ... 3
  • If N when divided by 3 has remainder 1 then use: 3 3 ... 2 2
  • If N when divided by 3 has remainder 2 then use: 3 3 ... 3 2
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missed special case N=1 –  Heath Hunnicutt May 19 '10 at 19:32
    
@Heath: Thanks, fixed. –  Mark Byers May 19 '10 at 19:35
    
How can you use 3 3 ... 2 2 for 4? Won't this print 3 1 for 4? –  IVlad May 19 '10 at 19:37
    
@IVlad: (4 % 3) == 1 so use 3 3 .. 2 2. Since 2 + 2 = 4, you need no 3's and two 2's. –  Mark Byers May 19 '10 at 19:39

AS confusing as your question is, I think what you need to do is first determine:

number_of_rows = ceil(number_of_logos / 3.0)

Then add a logo to each row, one at a time.

Python:

import math
def partition_logos(count, lsize):
    num_lines = int(math.ceil(count / float(lsize)))
    partition = [0] * num_lines
    for i in xrange(count):
        partition[i%num_lines] += 1
    return partition

>>> for i in xrange(1,11):
...     print partition_logos(i, 3)
[1]
[2]
[3]
[2, 2]
[3, 2]
[3, 3]
[3, 2, 2]
[3, 3, 2]
[3, 3, 3]
[3, 3, 2, 2]
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+1 - very simple :) –  Mark Byers May 19 '10 at 19:31
    
Another good feature of this solution is that the 3 isn't hard-coded. –  Mark Byers May 19 '10 at 19:42
    
Thanks. Isn't part of a programmer's job taking ambiguous, poorly specified requirements and distilling them down into a neat, tidy solution? ;) –  MikeyB May 19 '10 at 19:51

A recursive solution, in Python:

def logos_by_row(N, rows):
    width = 0
    if N > 4 or N == 3:
        width = 3
    elif N == 4 or N == 2:
        width = 2
    elif N == 1:
        width = 1

    if width != 0:
        rows.append(width)
        logos_by_row(N - width, rows)


answer = []
for i in range(10):
    logos_by_row(i+1, answer)
print answer
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just use n/3 to calculate the row and n%3 to calculate the column

edit: ok i saw you edited your question.... i din't saw that you want to display 2 in each row if the are 4 logos. but then you can use n mod 3 to calculate if their is a reminder as others already suggested

if n%3 = 0 then just put 3 logos in each row if n%3 = 1 then put the last 4 logos in two rows if n%3 = 2 then put 3 logos in n row and the last 2 logos in a separate row

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That would give 3 3 3 1 for 10, where the questioner wants 3 3 2 2 (i.e. try to balance the rows better). –  psmears May 19 '10 at 19:33
    
yes i was still editing sry ;) –  anon May 19 '10 at 19:37

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