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In XCode, is there a way to specify that all files in a folder are compiled by a target. Eg. the 'Test' target automatically compiles all files in the 'Tests' folder, whereas the 'App' target compiles everything in the 'Sources' folder. Today, the way I'm doing it, is to add a file to a target everytime I create it. This feels a bit error prone and redundant since the files are already organized in the correct folders.

Thanks.

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6 Answers 6

When you add files to xcode project you have options to choose in files select dialog:

  1. Create groups for any added folder
  2. Create folder reference for any added folders

You need to select your folder and second option (2.). In this case xcode will always reflect changes to files and subfolder of selected folder.

Question seams was asked long time ago, but its still on first places in google search, so its can be helpfull for someone .

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2  
Unfortunately it doesn't work anymore. Xcode doesn't add folder reference to "compile sources". Not sure about Xcode 4, but Xcode 5 it is definitely not working. Apple removed a lot of handy features, e.g. this one and dragging folders to another project. –  superarts.org May 29 at 3:58

Yes - just select all the files in the folder and use the inspector window (targets tab).

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3  
But with this, every time a new file is created, the target will need to be specified. What would be nice is, if there was a way of auto setting this target based on the folder in which the file is in. Then, there would be no need to assign targets to files everytime, since they would be in the correct folder. eg. Test, App example from above. –  Akshay Rawat May 19 '10 at 20:29
    
@Akshay: I see what you're saying - yes, that might save a little time. You can use the Apple Bug Reporter to make feature requests such as this. –  Paul R May 19 '10 at 20:50
1  
just found this from googling - there HAS to be a way to do this, i bet. looking to do the same thing. –  taber May 19 '10 at 23:46
    
You might try asking on Apple's Xcode mailing list: "Xcode Users" <xcode-users@lists.apple.com> –  Paul R May 20 '10 at 5:16

Here are some other questions on stackoverflow attempting to deal with this issue:

Add files to an XCode project from a script?

Automatically adding generated source files to an xcode project

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None of these are relevant here. The first one is about resource files and Akshay asked about source files. The second one is not relevant either, the link for the project is dead and it does not play well with dependency tracking; modifying an Xcode project after the build has been started is like patching your binary compiler while it is compiling a source file. It might work, though I would not rely on that for a single second. –  Mecki Apr 18 '12 at 19:10
    
@Mecki The minit project was deleted, but the github.com/expanz/xcode-editor project is around. Modifying an Xcode project is more like modifying a make file, perhaps not the safest thing to do, but doable. With the right combination of tools and processes it will work. It depends on what you want to do. –  ThomasW Apr 18 '12 at 23:54

One approach you could take is to use CMake to generate the Xcode target for you.

Detail: CMake - Automatically add all files in a folder to a target?

Another potential avenue would be to configure a custom build phase.

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You can add multiple files to targets with this. But it requires some work in filtering what files you want.

Project > Target > Compile Sources > cmd+A to select all files > filter for .m files > click "Add"

Similar to other resources,

Project > Target > Copy Bundle Resources > filter for .png .wav .strings .xib .storyboard, etc. > click "Add"

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Xcode is extensible using shell scripts. You can set the shell script to run at build time so you can basically make xcode do anything you want. You're only limited by your shell scripting abilities and I'm sure you can find help for that too.

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How exactly would that look like? Of course it should not recompile all files all the time, etc. –  Albert Jul 25 '10 at 14:14

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