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I have to handle this scenario in Java:

I'm getting a request in XML form from a client with declared encoding=utf-8. Unfortunately it may contain not utf-8 characters and there is a requirement to remove these characters from the xml on my side (legacy).

Let's consider an example where this invalid XML contains £ (pound).

1) I get xml as java String with £ in it (I don't have access to interface right now, but I probably get xml as a java String). Can I use replaceAll(£, "") to get rid of this character? Any potential issues?

2) I get xml as an array of bytes - how to handle this operation safely in that case?

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Your question is confusing. The pound is a valid UTF-8 character. Besides, UTF-8 covers practically every character the world is aware of. Can you maybe post some real world examples? Don't you rather mean that you want to get rid of non-ASCII characters? –  BalusC May 19 '10 at 20:21
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I would guess that you're getting XML which claims to be UTF-8, but is actually Windows-1252, ISO 8859-1 or so. That would make any non-ASCII character invalid because it's encoded wrongly. Is the requirement explicitly to remove those characters, or rather to fix the XML errors (which you/they presume is done by removing the offending characters)? In case of the latter you should be able to convert your input to UTF-8 before you parse it, presuming your client always uses the same (wrong) encoding. I don't know enough Java to tell you how to do that. –  mercator May 19 '10 at 20:48
    
Note that you need to do this NOT using XML tools, because the parser is allowed to terminate when the input is not 100% correct. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jun 2 '13 at 12:46
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5 Answers 5

UTF-8 is an encoding; Unicode is a character set. But the GBP symbol is most definitely in the Unicode character set and therefore most certainly representable in UTF-8.

If you do in fact mean UTF-8, and you are actually trying to remove byte sequences that are not the valid encoding of a character in UTF-8, then...

CharsetDecoder utf8Decoder = Charset.forName("UTF-8").newDecoder();
utf8Decoder.onMalformedInput(CodingErrorAction.IGNORE);
utf8Decoder.onUnmappableCharacter(CodingErrorAction.IGNORE);
ByteBuffer bytes = ...;
CharBuffer parsed = utf8Decoder.decode(bytes);
...
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1) I get xml as java String with £ in it (I don't have access to interface right now, but I probably get xml as a java String). Can I use replaceAll(£, "") to get rid of this character?

I am assuming that you rather mean that you want to get rid of non-ASCII characters, because you're talking about a "legacy" side. You can get rid of anything outside the printable ASCII range using the following regex:

string = string.replaceAll("[^\\x20-\\x7e]", "");

2) I get xml as an array of bytes - how to handle this operation safely in that case?

You need to wrap the byte[] in an ByteArrayInputStream, so that you can read them in an UTF-8 encoded character stream using InputStreamReader wherein you specify the encoding and then use a BufferedReader to read it line by line.

E.g.

BufferedReader reader = null;
try {
    reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new ByteArrayInputStream(bytes), "UTF-8"));
    for (String line; (line = reader.readLine()) != null;) {
        line = line.replaceAll("[^\\x20-\\x7e]", "");
        // ...
    }
    // ...
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YOU ARE AWESOME!!!! –  noob Oct 10 '13 at 14:55
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"test text".replaceAll("[^\\u0000-\\uFFFF]", "");

This code removes all 4-byte utf8 chars from string.This can be needed for some purposes while doing Mysql innodb varchar entry

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I faced the same problem while reading files from a local directory and tried this:

BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(filePath), "UTF-8"));
DocumentBuilder db = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance().newDocumentBuilder();
Document xmlDom = db.parse(new InputSource(in));

You might have to use your network input stream instead of FileInputStream.

-- Kapil

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Note that the first step should be that you ask the creator of the XML (which is most likely a home grown "just print data" XML generator) to ensure that their XML is correct before sending to you. The simplest possible test if they use Windows is to ask them to view it in Internet Explorer and see the parsing error at the first offending character.

While they fix that, you can simply write a small program that change the header part to declare that the encoding is ISO-8859-1 instead:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="iso-8859-1" ?>

and leave the rest untouched.

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