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I'm customizing my git log to be all in 1 line. Specifically, I added the following alias:

lg = log --graph --pretty=format:'%Cred%h%Creset - %C(yellow)%an%Creset - %s %Cgreen(%cr)%Creset' --abbrev-commit --date=relative

So, when I run git lg, I see the following:

* 41a49ad - zain - commit 1 message here (3 hours ago)
* 6087812 - zain - commit 2 message here (5 hours ago)
* 74842dd - zain - commit 3 message here (6 hours ago)

However, I want to add the SVN revision number in there too, so it looks something like:

* 41a49ad - r1593 - zain - commit 1 message here (3 hours ago)

The normal git log shows you the SVN revision number, so I'm sure this must be possible. How do I do this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

When you say that "the normal git log shows you the SVN revision number", I guess you mean that you are dealing with a repository handled by git svn, which by default adds a line like this at the end of the synchronized commits:

git-svn-id: svn://path/to/repository@###### <domain>

Now, as far as git is concerned, this is just random text, so I doubt that you can find a % accessor to read the ###### revision number from there.

At this point your best option would be to just parse the output of plain git log by yourself. Here's a crude starting point:

git log -z | tr '\n\0' ' \n' | sed 's/\(commit \S*\) .*git-svn-id: svn:[^@]*@\([0-9]*\) .*/\1 r\2/'
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VonC's solution is much simpler –  Nick Dowell Aug 15 at 8:21

Consider the command git svn

  • it has a similar log function than git log: git svn log
  • it has the find-rev option (to retrieve the SVN revision from a SHA1 key) (introduced in git 1.6.0)

I am not sure of you can combine those two options in one command line though.
A script (a bit like this one which is not exactly what you want but still can give some idea) might be in order.


sdaau adds in the comments:

An example of this:

git svn find-rev $(git log --max-count 1 --pretty=format:%H)
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An example of this: git svn find-rev $(git log --max-count 1 --pretty=format:%H) –  sdaau Jul 21 at 2:49
    
@sdaau Thank you. I have included your example in the answer for more visibility. –  VonC Jul 21 at 5:55

Run:

git rev-parse HEAD

which gives you git commit hash.

Then use that commit hash to run:

git svn find-rev <commit_hash>

Which gives you svn revision.

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Works perfectly. Thanks! –  Mhmmd May 2 '13 at 18:07
    
I like this answer best, because it seems most direct. Here's my take on a one-line version: echo "r$(git svn find-rev $(git rev-parse HEAD))". This works as an alias of course: rev = !echo "r$(git svn find-rev $(git rev-parse HEAD))" –  seafangs Jul 17 '13 at 12:43
    
I like this answer best, because it seems most direct. Here's my take on a one-line version: echo "r$(git svn find-rev $(git rev-parse HEAD))". This works as an alias of course: svnrev = !echo "r$(git svn find-rev $(git rev-parse HEAD))". This also makes it so you can mimic svn export even better export = !git archive --format zip --output /tmp/$(git svnrev) master –  seafangs Jul 17 '13 at 12:50
    
git svn find-rev also works the other way round, just specify the SVN revision number prefixed with an r: git svn find-rev r63919. –  Flimm Oct 1 '13 at 9:02
4  
Maybe this wasn't true when you submitted the answer (or I have special git/svn version), but for me it also works to simply write git svn find-rev HEAD. –  yngve Oct 2 '13 at 8:52

Ended up with something like this:

git svn log --oneline -1 | cut -d '|' -f1

That gives the last revision from that repo (you can tweak git svn log parameters for showing another revision, but keep --oneline and -1), but with a trailing whitespace (something like "r9441 ") that I think should be easy to strip out.

Hope it helps...

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