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Copy/paste this html code snippet and try it out in IE7. When you toggle the hidden columns it leaves a gap between the columns. In Firefox it works fine, the columns touch when minimized. Haven't tried IE8 yet, would be curious to hear how it works there. Any ideas? I've tried a bunch of things in the CSS like table-layout:fixed but no luck.

Note: Not looking for a different toggling method because the table I'm really dealing with is 50+ columns wide and 4000+ rows so looping/jquery techniques are too slow.

Here's the code - if someone can re-post a working version of it I'll instantly give them the check and be forever in your debt!

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<script>
function toggle() {
   var tableobj = document.getElementById("mytable");
   if (tableobj.className == "") {
      tableobj.className = "hide1 hide2";
   }
   else {
      tableobj.className = "";
   }
}
</script>
<style>
   table { border-collapse: collapse; }
   td, th { border: 1px solid silver; }
   .hide1 .col1 { display: none; }
   .hide2 .col2 { display: none; }
</style>
</head>
<body>
<input type="button" value="toggle" onclick="toggle();" />
<table id="mytable">
<tr>
   <th>A</th>
   <th colspan="2">B</th>
   <th colspan="2" class="col1">B1</th>
   <th colspan="2">C</th>
   <th colspan="2" class="col2">C1</th>
</tr>
<tr>
   <td>123</td>
   <td>456</td>
   <td>789</td>
   <td class="col1">123</td>
   <td class="col1">456</td>
   <td>789</td>
   <td>123</td>
   <td class="col2">456</td>
   <td class="col2">789</td>
</tr>
</table>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
1  
Browsers have different box models. Thus causing slightly different effects in the browsers see (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Explorer_box_model_bug) IE is holding the size of the "hidden" element by the text inside it. –  Lavabeams May 20 '10 at 2:04
    
@Ozaki - any idea how to prevent it from doing this in my case? I've never run into this issue with tables before - hope there is a way to resolve it. –  Art Peterson May 20 '10 at 2:13
    
@Ozaki - Browsers do NOT have different box models if you use the same doctype but which model used depends on the doctype used. –  Rob May 20 '10 at 2:46
    
@Rob Yes they do. IE does not use the W3C standard for box models. The only way IE will run the same is if they pull it apart and remake it from scratch it does not follow W3C standards in ALOT of places. Where as webkit / chrome / Firefox try to adhere to. See: (w3.org) –  Lavabeams May 20 '10 at 3:03
    
By the way, tested my code in IE8 and it works fine. Just an IE7 issue - yuck. –  Art Peterson May 20 '10 at 3:30
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's a solution that uses JQuery to toggle the column headers (see my other answer for the rationale). Apart from the JQuery stuff, the rest of the html page is the same.

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<script src="http://ajax.microsoft.com/ajax/jquery/jquery-1.3.2.min.js"  type="text/javascript"></script>    

<script>
function toggle() {
   var tableobj = document.getElementById("mytable");
   if (tableobj.className == "") {
      tableobj.className = "hide1 hide2";
      $('th[class^=col]').hide();
   }
   else {
      tableobj.className = "";
      $('th[class^=col]').show();
   }
}
</script>
<style>
   table { border-collapse: collapse; }
   td, th { border: 1px solid silver; }
   .hide1 .col1 { display: none; }
   .hide2 .col2 { display: none; }
</style>
</head>
<body>
<input type="button" value="toggle" onclick="toggle();" />
<table id="mytable">
<tr>
   <th>A</th>
   <th colspan="2">B</th>
   <th colspan="2" class="col1">B1</th>
   <th colspan="2">C</th>
   <th colspan="2" class="col2">C1</th>
</tr>
<tr>
   <td>123</td>
   <td>456</td>
   <td>789</td>
   <td class="col1">123</td>
   <td class="col1">456</td>
   <td>789</td>
   <td>123</td>
   <td class="col2">456</td>
   <td class="col2">789</td>
</tr>
</table>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Wow - this looks very promising! Testing it out will get back to you. –  Art Peterson May 20 '10 at 5:46
    
This definitely fixes the issue, and since it only has to loop through the THs there is no slow-down. You are awesome, thank you thank you thank you! –  Art Peterson May 20 '10 at 14:23
    
Glad that this worked out for you. I've come to the conclusion that this is a bug in IE7. If there are any performance issues, even a slight lag on a slow machine, you might want to conditionalize the jquery calls so that they're used only if needed. –  jdigital May 20 '10 at 15:57
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Don't yet have an explanation of why IE is doing this, but here's what's happening and here's how to work around it.

1) If you set the table class to 'hide1 hide2' in the html, then the table will render properly (no gap). Therefore, the problem seems to be related to the way that IE handles changes to a table via styles.

2) The gap between the columns is the width of the spanned column header.

3) If you eliminate column spanning (and the extra columns), then everything works fine.

I've found two workarounds. The first is to use code to toggle the display, but you've rejected that option.

The alternative is to eliminate the colspans. There are a variety of ways to do that. One is to convert the group of cells to be spanned into an embedded table (that is, instead of two TD elements, you'll have one TD which contains a TABLE with one TR and two TDs). Or you can use SPANs for cleaner code (with, say, a BORDER-RIGHT for all cells but the last).

share|improve this answer
    
Elimination of the colspans is not a good workaround because the widths of the SPANs or the TDs in the embedded TABLE will vary depending on the value in the cell - so the border will not line up down the page like a table. What do you mean by using code to toggle the display - I rejected one particular implementation because it was significantly slower but perhaps there is a way that will give similar results to this method? –  Art Peterson May 20 '10 at 3:38
    
Thanks for the attempt - that only works for one row. Like I already mentioned try to add a few more TR data rows with varying length values in the TDs and see how the border line does not line up down the page. –  Art Peterson May 20 '10 at 3:43
    
To do this in code, keep what you already have, and then augment the toggle function to loop thru all the TH elements that want to hide and explicitly set their style.display to 'none' (or to an empty string when you want to make the columns visible again). The good news is that you only need to do the TH cells, not the TDs, so this might be efficient enought. –  jdigital May 20 '10 at 3:43
    
BTW, with jquery, you can use $('th.col1').hide() to hide all TH cells with class col1 and you can use the show() method to show them (no need for you to search or loop when you can have jquery do it for you). –  jdigital May 20 '10 at 3:54
    
I just tried using jquery to hide the TH cells with class col1 but it simply hid the TH cells but left the TD cells displayed. –  Art Peterson May 20 '10 at 4:39
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Try this doctype declaration:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
share|improve this answer
    
How would that make difference? His doctype is entirely fine. Why switching from HTML to XHTML? –  BalusC May 20 '10 at 2:26
    
Sorry. edited. If you have an incorrectly declared doctype, IE goes into quirks mode i believe. –  edl May 20 '10 at 2:37
    
Thanks for catching that, I left out the "!" in the doctype. Added it in but it made no difference. –  Art Peterson May 20 '10 at 3:29
    
Sorry that didn't fix your problem. It fixes it on IE8 and I don't have IE7 to try it on. Good luck! –  edl May 20 '10 at 3:33
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