Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Searching the web, I find heaps of different suggestions for what the proper MIME type for a font is, but I have yet to try any MIME type that rids me of a Chrome warning such as the following:

Resource interpreted as font but transferred with MIME type font/otf

The font is an OTF.

I've tried the following MIME types so far

  • font/otf
  • application/font-otf
  • application/font
  • application/otf
  • application/octet-stream
  • application/x-font-otf
  • application/x-font-TrueType (I know it's not truetype, but one source quoted this for OTF)
share|improve this question
2  
How do you actually write the header for this? I'm not really sure what to do. Cheers for any help you can give. –  Josh Smith Nov 9 '10 at 22:28
1  
@Josh: if you're serving the font through code, you want to set the "content-type" header to "font/opentype" (if you're using an OTF as in my question), but if you're simply pointing to a physical font file, it might be easier to set the MIME types in your web server. I don't know what web server you're using, so do a google search for yourserver + mime types or start a new question on SO describing your problem. –  David Hedlund Nov 10 '10 at 7:33
2  
The title is wrong. It should be "How do I silence the "resource interpreted as font" warning in Chrome –  djsadinoff Jan 11 '11 at 11:27
2  
@djs: granted! You know, if I could find a way to make Chrome remember that I want my console to list log messages and errors, but not warnings, there's a fair chance I would never have asked this question in the first place. –  David Hedlund Jan 11 '11 at 11:32
    
Chrome is warning us that it is doing what we asked. I'd rather see a warning when it successfully figured out the bitmaps to use for glyphs if you used @font-face with a .BMP file! –  cardiff space man May 29 at 17:04

11 Answers 11

up vote 78 down vote accepted

Try using "font/opentype".

share|improve this answer
1  
cheers, worked! –  David Hedlund May 26 '10 at 6:14
24  
This is an illegal mimetype though: there is no "font/" in the official mimetypes. A better mime type would be "application/x-font-opentype" or "application/octet-stream". The first is basically "unregistered mimetype with this name", the second just "binary data" –  dtech Jul 23 '11 at 21:42
    
It doesn't work for me on Chrome 16. One that worked was: application/vnd.oasis.opendocument.formula-template. –  jayarjo Jan 6 '12 at 16:42
12  
Looks like the current winner is: application/x-font-woff - hope it helps! –  busticated Feb 15 '12 at 19:15
4  
@busticated this has been changed to application/font-woff see w3.org/TR/WOFF/#appendix-b –  Holger Jun 26 '13 at 10:57

Ignore the chrome warning. There is no standard MIME type for OTF fonts.

font/opentype may silence the warning, but that doesn't make it the "right" thing to do.

Arguably, you're better off making one up, e.g. with "application/x-opentype" because at least "application" is a registered content type, while "font" is not.

Update: OTF remains a problem, but WOFF grew an IANA MIME type of application/font-woff in January 2013.

Update 2: OTF has grown a MIME type: application/font-sfnt In March 2013. This type also applies to .ttf

share|improve this answer
2  
Interesting. Do you have any references that back this up? –  Kzqai May 15 '11 at 0:50
16  
There is no mime type: "Note: Because there are no defined MIME types for TrueType, OpenType, and WOFF fonts, the MIME type of the file specified is not considered." developer.mozilla.org/en/css/@font-face . Don't make up new top-level mime-types, use x- instead: tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2045#section-5 – djsadinoff 3 mins ago edit –  djsadinoff May 15 '11 at 10:13
    
Good info to know. –  Kzqai May 16 '11 at 15:00
    
+1 See also iana.org/assignments/media-types/index.html –  tripleee Sep 6 '12 at 8:31
1  
I pretend no expertise on the ins and outs of stackExchange. –  djsadinoff May 4 at 16:15

There are a number of font formats that one can set MIME types for, on both Apache and IIS servers. I've traditionally had luck with the following:

svg  as "image/svg+xml"
ttf  as "application/x-font-ttf" or "application/x-font-truetype"
otf  as "application/x-font-opentype"
woff as "application/font-woff" (per my last paragraph)
eot  as "application/vnd.ms-fontobject"

According to the Internet Engineering Task Force who maintain the initial document regarding Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME types) here: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2045#section-5 ... it says in specifics:

"It is expected that additions to the larger set of supported types can generally be accomplished by the creation of new subtypes of these initial types. In the future, more top-level types may be defined only by a standards-track extension to this standard. If another top-level type is to be used for any reason, it must be given a name starting with "X-" to indicate its non-standard status and to avoid a potential conflict with a future official name."

As it were, and over time, additional MIME types get added as standards are created and accepted, therefor we see examples of vendor specific MIME types such as vnd.ms-fontobject and the like.

UPDATE August 16, 2013: WOFF was formally registered at IANA on January 3, 2013 and Webkit has been updated on March 5, 2013 and browsers that are sourcing this update in their latest versions will start issuing warnings about the server MIME types with the old x-font-woff declaration. Since the warnings are only annoying I would recommend switching to the approved MIME type right away. In an ideal world, the warnings will resolve themselves in time.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think you mean "eot" rather than "eof". –  G-Wiz Sep 14 '12 at 7:19
    
Typo! Well gWiz,.. thanks! –  Mike Kormendy Sep 15 '12 at 10:22
    
Good ones, thanks. I had error messages with .woff and this fixed it in my .htaccess file. I used AddType application/x-font-woff –  Danny Englander Sep 17 '12 at 19:34
3  
WOFF standards states to use applicaton/font-woff , if I get it right w3.org/TR/WOFF/#appendix-b –  Open SEO Sep 26 '12 at 11:21
    
application/x-font-opentype and application/x-font-ttf work perfectly for Linux Gnome Shell –  Schmoove Feb 16 '13 at 12:54

As there's still a lot of confusion on the web about MIME types for web fonts, I thought I'd give a current answer, complete with effective dates, and supporting links to IANA and the W3C.

Here are the official MIME types for Web Fonts:

While on the topic of web servers, it's worth mentioning that you can gzip (or otherwise compress) all the above font formats except .woff, which is already gzip compressed.

I say more in MIME Types for Web Fonts with (Fantom) BedSheet.

share|improve this answer
    
Duplicate posts are auto-detected on SO, and you risk having both posts deleted. If you have useful information to publish then you should consider asking and answering your own question. –  Borodin Dec 21 '13 at 23:21
    
Ack! I've been caught out! Yeah, I was being lazy. :/ I've updated the other answer so it's more relevant to its related question. I believe it's still a good fit for this page though. –  Steve Eynon Dec 21 '13 at 23:48
    
There is a a huge amount of questionable answers to be assessed. I try to make a point of commenting on those that I mark down, but most commonly your answers would just vanish. Please try to remain topical. –  Borodin Dec 22 '13 at 0:35

FWIW regarding Apache 2.2 VirtualHosting and mod_mime tested on Debian Linux and OS X Leopard and Snow Leopard:

If you have a VirtualHost configuration you will want to add the types via the AddType Directive as follows at least at the bottom of the configuration as follows:

....
   AddType font/opentype .otf
   AddType font/ttf .ttf
</VirtualHost>

Tested against Chrome Unstable/Trunk and Safari WebKit Nightly which eliminates the mime octet-stream warnings for both the ttf and otf font types.

Note: .htaccess has zero effect when dealing with VirtualHosting. If you're developing for several sites you'll be using VirtualHosting development and each configuration will need these AddType additions.

share|improve this answer

I just did some research on IANA official list. I believe the answer given here 'font/xxx' is incorrect as there is no 'font' type in the MIME standard.

Based on the RFCs and IANA, this appears to be the current state of the play as at May 2013:

These three are official and assigned by IANA:

  • svg as "image/svg+xml"
  • woff as "application/font-woff"
  • eot as "application/vnd.ms-fontobject"

These are not not official/assigned, and so must use the 'x-' syntax:

  • ttf as "application/x-font-ttf"
  • otf as "application/x-font-opentype"

The application/font-woff appears new and maybe only official since Jan 2013. So "application/x-font-woff" might be safer/more compatible in the short term.

share|improve this answer

Maybe this will help someone. I saw that on IIS 7 .ttf is already a known mime-type. It's configured as:

application/octet-stream

So I just added that for all the CSS font types (.oet, .svg, .ttf, .woff) and IIS started serving them. Chrome dev tools also do not complain about re-interpreting the type.

Cheers, Michael

share|improve this answer
1  
application/octet-stream is less a "known type" and more a "generic bunch of bytes". :) The browser's complaining about being served this type, because it carries no info about how the stuff should be interpreted. –  cHao Jan 25 '13 at 13:52

Here is NGINX solution

file

/usr/local/nginx/conf/mime.types

add

font/ttf                      ttf;
font/opentype                 otf;
application/font-woff         woff;
application/vnd.ms-fontobject eot;

remove

application/octet-stream        eot;

Thanks to Mike Fulcher

http://drawingablank.me/blog/font-mime-types-in-nginx.html

share|improve this answer

The following can be used in the eBook space:

application/vnd.ms-opentype

I would imagine that it is the same for the web.

share|improve this answer

One way to silence this warning from Chrome would be to update Chrome and then make sure your mime type is one of these:

 "font/ttf"
 "font/opentype"
 "application/font-woff"
 "application/x-font-type1"
 "application/x-font-ttf"
 "application/x-truetype-font"

This list is per the patch found at Bug 111418 at webkit.org.

The same patch demotes the message from a "Warning" to a "Log", so just upgrading Chrome to any post March-2013 version would get rid of the yellow triangle.

Since the question is about silencing a Chrome warning, and folks might be holding on to old Chrome versions for whatever reasons, I figured this was worth adding.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.