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My site is using enterprise library v 5.0. Mainly the DAAB. Some functions such as executescalar, executedataset are working as expected. The problems appear when I start to use Readers

I have this function in my includes class:

Public Function AssignedDepartmentDetail(ByVal Did As Integer) As SqlDataReader
    Dim reader As SqlDataReader
    Dim Command As SqlCommand = db.GetSqlStringCommand("select seomthing from somewhere where something = @did")
    db.AddInParameter(Command, "@did", Data.DbType.Int32, Did)
    reader = db.ExecuteReader(Command)
    reader.Read()
    Return reader
End Function

This is called from my aspx.vb like so:

reader = includes.AssignedDepartmentDetail(Did)
If reader.HasRows Then
    TheModule = reader("templatefilename")
    PageID = reader("id")
Else
    TheModule = "#"
End If

This gives the following error on db.ExecuteReader line:

Unable to cast object of type 'Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Data.RefCountingDataReader' to type 'System.Data.SqlClient.SqlDataReader'.

Can anyone shed any light on how I go about getting this working. Will I always run into problems when dealing with readers via entlib?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think I have a working solution.

enter code here

    ' Create the Database object, using the default database service. The
    ' default database service is determined through configuration.
    Dim db As Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Data.Database = EnterpriseLibraryContainer.Current.GetInstance(Of Microsoft.Practices.EnterpriseLibrary.Data.Database)(DatabaseName)

    Dim dbCommand As DbCommand
    dbCommand = db.GetStoredProcCommand(StoredProcedureName)

    'create a new database connection based on the enterprise library database connection
    Dim dbConnection As System.Data.Common.DbConnection
    dbConnection = db.CreateConnection
    dbConnection.Open()

    'set the dbCommand equal to the open dbConnection
    dbCommand.Connection = dbConnection

    'return a ADO sqlDatareader but still managed by the EnterpriseLibrary
    Return dbCommand.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection)
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This will return the unwrapped IDataReader, which can be cast to the provider specific reader if needed, such as the SqlDataReader. You are correct that this is not a RefCountingDataReader and will not encounter the casting error of the OP. However, it is important to point out one of the main reasons for the RefCountingDataReader implementation...(see next comment)... –  mdisibio Aug 31 '13 at 5:56
    
If there is a System.Transaction in use (database calls wrapped in TransactionScope() for example) then it will see "dbConnection.Open()" as a second transaction, whether or not you are actually modifying anything. And with the second connection, it will then engage the MS Distributed Transaction Coordinator to manage the transaction. It is a corner case, but if it occurs, that would be a tremendous overhead just to fetch some data (and the DTC service might not even be running on your server). –  mdisibio Aug 31 '13 at 6:00

I would be careful with this implementation. There is a thread on the Enterprise Library Codeplex site that explains the backgound for this: http://entlib.codeplex.com/Thread/View.aspx?ThreadId=212973

Chris Tavares explains that it's not good to just return the .InnerReader, because then the connection tracking by Enterprise Library is thrown off (his response from May 20, 5:39PM): "That approach will completely screw up your connection management. The whole reason for the wrapper is so that we could execute extra code to clean stuff up at dispose time. Grabbing the inner reader and throwing out the outer will leak connections! "

So yes, this is a bit of a pain to deal with, we're in the same situation.

Regards, Mike

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ExecuteReader in Enterprise Library wraps IDataReader into RefCountingDataReader that as SqlDataReader implements IDataReader interface.

RefCountingDataReader has InnerReader property that you can cast to SqlDataReader. The sample below is in C# but you can easily convert it to VB.NET.

SqlDataReader reader;
reader = ((RefCountingDataReader)db.ExecuteReader(command)).InnerReader as SqlDataReader;
if (reader != null)
    reader.Read();
return reader;

Hope it helps

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1  
DO NOT DO THIS! It will leak database connections! –  Chris Tavares Aug 26 '10 at 17:37

I am having leaking connections because all my DA methods require a SqlDataReader. Now I have to return the inner RefCountingDataReader and can never close the outer reader. The old Enterprise Library was working fine with returning a SqlDataReader.

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Actually, the old Entlib was NOT working fine, that's why we made the change. The problem was subtle, but resulted in some very nasty, hard to track down exceptions in multi-threaded applications when using TransactionScopes. –  Chris Tavares Aug 23 '10 at 4:54
    
Just to be clear, the InnerReader is the SqlDataReader and the 'outer' reader is RefCountingDataReader... –  mdisibio Aug 31 '13 at 5:50

I've taken into account the comments and code posted by ctavars at http://entlib.codeplex.com/discussions/212973 and http://entlib.codeplex.com/discussions/211288, resulting in the following generic approach to obtaining an SQL data reader.

In general you use IDataReader in the using statement, then use that reference directly when you can. Call AsSqlDataReader on it when you need something SQL-specific.

Add this extension class somewhere:

/// <summary>
/// Obtains an <see cref="SqlDataReader"/> from less derived data readers in Enterprise Library
/// </summary>
/// <remarks>
/// See http://entlib.codeplex.com/discussions/212973 and http://entlib.codeplex.com/discussions/211288
/// for a discussion of why this is necessary
/// </remarks>
public static class SqlDataReaderExtension
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Allows the internal <see cref="SqlDataReader"/> of a <see cref="RefCountingDataReader"/> to be accessed safely
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>
    /// To ensure correct use, the returned reference must not be retained and used outside the scope of the input
    /// reference. This is so that the reference counting does not get broken. In practice this means calling this method
    /// on the base reader every time a reference to it is required.
    /// </remarks>
    public static SqlDataReader AsSqlDataReader(this RefCountingDataReader reader)
    {
        return (SqlDataReader)(reader.InnerReader);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Allows the internal <see cref="SqlDataReader"/> of a <see cref="IDataReader"/> to be accessed safely
    /// </summary>
    /// <remarks>
    /// To ensure correct use, the returned reference must not be retained and used outside the scope of the input
    /// reference. This is so that the reference counting does not get broken. In practice this means calling this method
    /// on the base reader every time a reference to it is required.
    /// </remarks>
    public static SqlDataReader AsSqlDataReader(this IDataReader reader)
    {
        return (SqlDataReader)(((RefCountingDataReader)(reader)).InnerReader);
    }
}

... then to read data with an SQLReader, do something like this:

using (IDataReader reader = db.ExecuteReader(command))
{
    while (reader.Read())
    {
        reader.GetInt32(reader.GetOrdinal("SomeColumn")),
        reader.GetInt32(reader.GetOrdinal("SomeOtherColumn")),
        reader.GetInt32(reader.GetOrdinal("SomeFurtherColumn")),
        // Obtain the SQL data reader each time it is used
        // (Note that GetDateTimeOffset is not on the standard IDataReader)
        reader.AsSqlDataReader().GetDateTimeOffset(reader.GetOrdinal("SQLSpecificColumn"))
        reader.AsSqlDataReader().GetDateTimeOffset(reader.GetOrdinal("AnotherSQLSpecificColumn"))
        reader.GetString(reader.GetOrdinal("SomeAdditionalColumn"))
    }
}
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1  
After spending several hours in the source code, I believe this is truly the correct approach. It must be emphasized that the accepted answer above will allow memory leaks if any System.Transaction (TransactionScope) is used. –  mdisibio Aug 31 '13 at 5:45

You should use the interface, not the concrete class.

Public Function AssignedDepartmentDetail(ByVal Did As Integer) As IDataReader
    Dim reader As IDataReader
    Dim Command As SqlCommand = db.GetSqlStringCommand("select seomthing from somewhere where something = @did")
    db.AddInParameter(Command, "@did", Data.DbType.Int32, Did)
    reader = db.ExecuteReader(Command)
    reader.Read()
    Return reader
End Function

and the usage. Personally, I would never use a datareader in a presentation layer page, but to each his/her own I guess.

Private Const TemplateFileName_Select_Column_Ordinal As Integer = 0
Private Const Id_Select_Column_Ordinal As Integer = 1

Private Sub DoSomething()
dim reader as IDataReader
reader = includes.AssignedDepartmentDetail(Did)
If reader.HasRows Then
    TheModule = reader(TemplateFileName_Select_Column_Ordinal)
    PageID = reader(Id_Select_Column_Ordinal)
Else
    TheModule = "#"

    reader.Close()  ''Dude, close your reader(s)

End If
share|improve this answer
    
Using the interface is the best-practice and most provider agnostic way to go, but sometimes you need the extra features of the provider specific class. Stephan's answer demonstrates how to do this without breaking the DAAB's underlying connection management. –  mdisibio Aug 31 '13 at 6:02

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