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What is the difference between printf() and cout in C++?

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19  
May I ask what made you accept @scatman's answer over, Mikeage's or Marcelo's or Kyle's? –  Amarghosh May 20 '10 at 12:00
    
I'm wondering about that too. –  Xavier Ho May 20 '10 at 12:27
9  
The question in its nature is equivalent to "What is the difference between a car and an airplane?". –  AndreyT May 20 '10 at 18:14
    
same wonder here!! –  Muhammad Hewedy May 21 '10 at 2:20
    
@Amarghosh perhaps because of rep points? –  AJMansfield Nov 16 '12 at 16:08

12 Answers 12

From the C++ FAQ:

[15.1] Why should I use <iostream> instead of the traditional <cstdio>?

Increase type safety, reduce errors, allow extensibility, and provide inheritability.

printf() is arguably not broken, and scanf() is perhaps livable despite being error prone, however both are limited with respect to what C++ I/O can do. C++ I/O (using << and >>) is, relative to C (using printf() and scanf()):

  • More type-safe: With <iostream>, the type of object being I/O'd is known statically by the compiler. In contrast, <cstdio> uses "%" fields to figure out the types dynamically.
  • Less error prone: With <iostream>, there are no redundant "%" tokens that have to be consistent with the actual objects being I/O'd. Removing redundancy removes a class of errors.
  • Extensible: The C++ <iostream> mechanism allows new user-defined types to be I/O'd without breaking existing code. Imagine the chaos if everyone was simultaneously adding new incompatible "%" fields to printf() and scanf()?!
  • Inheritable: The C++ <iostream> mechanism is built from real classes such as std::ostream and std::istream. Unlike <cstdio>'s FILE*, these are real classes and hence inheritable. This means you can have other user-defined things that look and act like streams, yet that do whatever strange and wonderful things you want. You automatically get to use the zillions of lines of I/O code written by users you don't even know, and they don't need to know about your "extended stream" class.

On the other hand, printf is significantly faster, which may justify using it in preference to cout in very specific and limited cases. Always profile first. (See, for example, http://programming-designs.com/2009/02/c-speed-test-part-2-printf-vs-cout/)

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1  
On the other other hand, there's the FastFormat library (fastformat.org), offering type-safety, expressivity and performance at once. (Not that I tried it yet...) –  xtofl May 20 '10 at 10:07
2  
There's also Boost.Format, wonder how the two compare. –  Matthieu M. May 20 '10 at 11:21
2  
@Marcelo probably because it's a good summary, with everything cited. The formatting... yeah, that's pretty bad. I should have fixed that myself, but it appears that others (yourself included) took care of it, which, of course, is more constructive than just whining. –  Mikeage May 21 '10 at 7:59
1  
As of late printf() is also supposed to be extensible. See "printf hooks" at udrepper.livejournal.com/20948.html –  Maxim Yegorushkin Nov 25 '11 at 8:32
2  
@MaximYegorushkin: Standard printf has no such ability. Non-portable library mechanisms are hardly on the same level as fully standardized extensibility of iostreams. –  Ben Voigt Jan 15 at 18:09

I'm surprised that everyone in this question claims that std::cout is way better than printf, even if the question just asked for differences. Now, there is a difference - std::cout is C++, and printf is C (however, you can use it in C++, just like almost anything else from C). Now, I'll be honest here, both printf and std::cout have their advantages.

Disclaimer: I'm more experienced with C than C++, so if there is a problem with my answer, feel free to edit or comment.

Real differences

Extensibility

std::cout is extensible. I know that people will say that printf is extensible too, but such extension is not mentioned in C standard (so you would have to use non-standard features - but not even common non-standard feature exists), and such extensions are one letter (so it's easy to conflict with already existing format).

Unlike printf, std::cout depends completely on operator overloading, so there is no issue with custom formats - all you do is define a subroutine taking std::ostream as first argument, and your type as second. As such, there are no namespace problems - as long you have a class (which isn't limited to one character), you can have working std::ostream overloading for it.

However, I doubt that many people would want to extend ostream (to be honest, I rarely saw such extensions, even if they are easy to make). However, it's here if you need it.

Syntax

As it could be easily noticed, both printf and std::cout use different syntax. printf uses standard function syntax using pattern string and variable-length argument lists. Actually, printf is a reason why C has them - printf formats are too complex to be usable without them. However, std::cout uses different API - the operator << API that returns itself.

Generally, that means the C version will be shorter, but in most cases it won't matter. The difference is noticeable when you print many arguments. If you have to write something like Error 2: File not found., assuming error number, and its description is placeholder, the code would look like this. The both examples work identically (well, sort of, std::endl actually flushes the buffer).

printf("Error %d: %s.\n", id, errors[id]);
std::cout << "Error " << id << ": " << errors[id] << "." << std::endl;

While this doesn't appear too crazy (it's just two times longer), things get more crazy when you actually format arguments, instead of just printing them. For example, printing of something like 0x0424 is just crazy. This is caused by std::cout mixing state and actual values. I never saw a language where something like std::setfill would be a type (other than C++, of course). printf clearly separates arguments and actual type. I really would prefer to maintain printf version of it (even if it looks kinda cryptic) compared to iostream version of it (as it contains too much noise).

printf("0x%04x\n", 0x424);
std::cout << "0x" << std::hex << std::setfill('0') << std::setw(4) << 0x424 << std::endl;

Translation

This is where real advantage of printf lies. printf format string is well... a string. That makes it really easy to translate, compared to operator << abuse of iostream. Assuming that gettext() function translates, and you want to show Error 2: File not found., the code to get translation of previously shown format string would look like this:

printf(gettext("Error %d: %s.\n"), id, errors[id]);

Now, let's assume that we translate to Fictionish (the language that actually doesn't exist), where error number is after description. The translated string would look like %2$s oru %1$d.\n. Now, how to do it in C++? Well, I have no idea. I guess you can make fake iostream which constructs printf that you can pass to gettext, or something, for purposes of translation. Of course, $ is not C standard, but it's so common that it's safe to use in my opinion.

Differences nobody cares about

Performance

Update: It turns out that iostream is so slow that it's usually slower than your hard drive (if you redirect your program to file). Disabling synchronization with stdio may help, if you need to output lots of data. If the performance is a real concern (as opposed to writing several lines to STDOUT), just use printf. If you really care about performance (like, really), perhaps consider changing your language to something else - from my experience, C++ is really slow when you use non-POD types. And if you limit yourself to POD, you may use C as well.

Everyone thinks that they care about performance, but nobody bothers to measure it. My answer is that I/O is bottleneck anyway, no matter if you use printf or iostream. I think that printf could be faster from a quick look into assembly (compiled with clang using -O3 compiler option). Assuming my error example, printf example does way less calls than cout example. This is int main with printf.

main:                                   @ @main
@ BB#0:
        push    {lr}
        ldr     r0, .LCPI0_0
        ldr     r2, .LCPI0_1
        mov     r1, #2
        bl      printf
        mov     r0, #0
        pop     {lr}
        mov     pc, lr
        .align  2
@ BB#1:

You can easily notice that two strings, and 2 (number) are pushed as printf argument. That's about it, there is nothing else. For comparison, this is iostream compiled to assembly. No, there is no inlining, every single operator << call means another call with another set of arguments.

main:                                   @ @main
@ BB#0:
        push    {r4, r5, lr}
        ldr     r4, .LCPI0_0
        ldr     r1, .LCPI0_1
        mov     r2, #6
        mov     r3, #0
        mov     r0, r4
        bl      _ZSt16__ostream_insertIcSt11char_traitsIcEERSt13basic_ostreamIT_T0_ES6_PKS3_l
        mov     r0, r4
        mov     r1, #2
        bl      _ZNSolsEi
        ldr     r1, .LCPI0_2
        mov     r2, #2
        mov     r3, #0
        mov     r4, r0
        bl      _ZSt16__ostream_insertIcSt11char_traitsIcEERSt13basic_ostreamIT_T0_ES6_PKS3_l
        ldr     r1, .LCPI0_3
        mov     r0, r4
        mov     r2, #14
        mov     r3, #0
        bl      _ZSt16__ostream_insertIcSt11char_traitsIcEERSt13basic_ostreamIT_T0_ES6_PKS3_l
        ldr     r1, .LCPI0_4
        mov     r0, r4
        mov     r2, #1
        mov     r3, #0
        bl      _ZSt16__ostream_insertIcSt11char_traitsIcEERSt13basic_ostreamIT_T0_ES6_PKS3_l
        ldr     r0, [r4]
        sub     r0, r0, #24
        ldr     r0, [r0]
        add     r0, r0, r4
        ldr     r5, [r0, #240]
        cmp     r5, #0
        beq     .LBB0_5
@ BB#1:                                 @ %_ZSt13__check_facetISt5ctypeIcEERKT_PS3_.exit
        ldrb    r0, [r5, #28]
        cmp     r0, #0
        beq     .LBB0_3
@ BB#2:
        ldrb    r0, [r5, #39]
        b       .LBB0_4
.LBB0_3:
        mov     r0, r5
        bl      _ZNKSt5ctypeIcE13_M_widen_initEv
        ldr     r0, [r5]
        mov     r1, #10
        ldr     r2, [r0, #24]
        mov     r0, r5
        mov     lr, pc
        mov     pc, r2
.LBB0_4:                                @ %_ZNKSt5ctypeIcE5widenEc.exit
        lsl     r0, r0, #24
        asr     r1, r0, #24
        mov     r0, r4
        bl      _ZNSo3putEc
        bl      _ZNSo5flushEv
        mov     r0, #0
        pop     {r4, r5, lr}
        mov     pc, lr
.LBB0_5:
        bl      _ZSt16__throw_bad_castv
        .align  2
@ BB#6:

However, to be honest, this means nothing, as I/O is bottleneck anyway. Just wanted to show that iostream is not faster because it's "type safe". Most C implementations implement printf formats using computed goto, so the printf is as fast as it can be, even without compiler being aware of printf (not that they aren't - some compilers can optimize printf in certain cases - constant string ending with \n is usually optimized to puts).

Inheritance

I don't know why you would want to inherit ostream, but I don't care. It's possible with FILE too.

typedef struct {
    FILE file;
    char *name;
} MY_FILE;

Type safety

True, variable length argument lists have no safety, but that doesn't matter, as popular C compilers can detect problems with printf format string if you enable warnings. In fact, Clang can do that without enabling warnings.

$ cat safety.c 
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    printf("String: %s\n", 42);
    return 0;
}
$ clang safety.c 
safety.c:4:28: warning: format specifies type 'char *' but the argument has type 'int' [-Wformat]
    printf("String: %s\n", 42);
                    ~~     ^~
                    %d
1 warning generated.
$ gcc -Wall safety.c 
safety.c: In function ‘main’:
safety.c:4:5: warning: format ‘%s’ expects argument of type ‘char *’, but argument 2 has type ‘int’ [-Wformat=]
     printf("String: %s\n", 42);
     ^
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1  
You say I/O is the bottleneck anyway. Obviously you never tested that assumption. I quote myself: "On the other hand, the iostreams version, at 75.3 MB/s, can't buffer data fast enough to keep up with a hard disk. That's bad, and it's not even doing any real work yet. I don't think I have too high expectations when I say my I/O library should be able to be able to saturate my disk controller." –  Ben Voigt Jan 15 at 18:15
    
@BenVoigt: I admit, I try to avoid C++ when possible. I tried using it a lot, but it was more annoying, and less maintainable than other programming language I used. This is yet another reason for me to avoid C++ - this isn't even fast (it's not even iostream - entire C++ library is slow in most implementations, perhaps with exception for std::sort, which is somehow surprisingly fast compared to qsort (2 times), at cost of executable size). –  xfix Jan 15 at 20:36
    
No one here has mentioned issues in parallel environment when using cout. –  Nicholas Hamilton May 19 at 23:35
    
@NicholasHamilton: Just don't print on multiple threads. This applies both to std::cout and printf. If you use multithreading for non-functional code (with side effects), you will be dealing with other, more serious issues. Locks don't help, they just make code slower than single threaded version of code. Don't use threads for performance without measuring it. –  xfix May 20 at 5:38

And I quote:

In high level terms, the main differences are type safety (cstdio doesn't have it), performance (most iostreams implementations are slower than the cstdio ones) and extensibility (iostreams allows custom output targets and seamless output of user defined types).

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People often claim that printf is much faster. This is largely a myth. I just tested it, with the following results:

cout with only endl                     1461.310252 ms
cout with only '\n'                      343.080217 ms
printf with only '\n'                     90.295948 ms
cout with string constant and endl      1892.975381 ms
cout with string constant and '\n'       416.123446 ms
printf with string constant and '\n'     472.073070 ms
cout with some stuff and endl           3496.489748 ms
cout with some stuff and '\n'           2638.272046 ms
printf with some stuff and '\n'         2520.318314 ms

Conclusion: if you want only newlines, use printf; otherwise, cout is almost as fast, or even faster. More details can be found on my blog.

To be clear, I'm not trying to say that iostreams are always better than printf; I'm just trying to say that you should make an informed decision based on real data, not a wild guess based on some common, misleading assumption.

Update: Here's the full code I used for testing. Compiled with g++ without any additional options (apart from -lrt for the timing).

#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>

class TimedSection {
    char const *d_name;
    timespec d_start;
    public:
        TimedSection(char const *name) :
            d_name(name)
        {
            clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &d_start);
        }
        ~TimedSection() {
            timespec end;
            clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &end);
            double duration = 1e3 * (end.tv_sec - d_start.tv_sec) +
                              1e-6 * (end.tv_nsec - d_start.tv_nsec);
            std::cerr << d_name << '\t' << std::fixed << duration << " ms\n"; 
        }
};

int main() {
    const int iters = 10000000;
    char const *text = "01234567890123456789";
    {
        TimedSection s("cout with only endl");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            std::cout << std::endl;
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("cout with only '\\n'");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            std::cout << '\n';
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("printf with only '\\n'");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            printf("\n");
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("cout with string constant and endl");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            std::cout << "01234567890123456789" << std::endl;
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("cout with string constant and '\\n'");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            std::cout << "01234567890123456789\n";
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("printf with string constant and '\\n'");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            printf("01234567890123456789\n");
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("cout with some stuff and endl");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            std::cout << text << "01234567890123456789" << i << std::endl;
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("cout with some stuff and '\\n'");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            std::cout << text << "01234567890123456789" << i << '\n';
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("printf with some stuff and '\\n'");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            printf("%s01234567890123456789%i\n", text, i);
    }
}
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1  
In your scores printf beats cout easily (majority cases). I wonder why you recommend using cout when it comes to perf. Though I agree perf is not too different in realistic cases.. –  mishal153 May 20 '10 at 12:07
2  
@mishal153: I'm just trying to say that the performance is not too different, so the commonly-heard advice of "never use cout because it's waaay slow" is plain stupid. Note that cout has the obvious advantage of type-safety, and often readability as well. (Floating-point formatting with iostreams is horrible...) –  Thomas May 20 '10 at 12:18
2  
@Thomas: "reproducing the code" wouldn't necessarily reproduce your results. In order to know if your benchmarks are valid, we need to be able to look at the code. But yeah, thanks for adding the code. :) –  jalf May 20 '10 at 12:30
8  
The important difference between printf() and std::ostream is that the former outputs all arguments in one single call whereas std::ostream incurs a separate call for each <<. The test only outputs one argument and a new-line, that's why you can't see the difference. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Nov 25 '11 at 8:36
5  
The compiler should be able to inline these calls. Also, printf might make a lot of calls under the covers to helper functions for various formatting specifiers... that, or it's a monstrous monolithic function. And again, because of inlining, it shouldn't make a difference in speed at all. –  Thomas Nov 26 '11 at 11:05

One is a function that prints to stdout. The other is an object that provides several member functions and overloads of operator<< that print to stdout. There are many more differences that I could enumerate, but I'm not sure what you are after.

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2  
This is definitely the key difference! –  pdbartlett May 20 '10 at 10:41

For me, the real differences which would make me go for 'cout' rather than 'printf' are:

1) << operator can be overloaded for my classes.

2) Output stream for cout can be easily changed to a file : (: copy paste :)

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

int main ()
{
    cout << "This is sent to prompt" << endl;
    ofstream file;
    file.open ("test.txt");
    streambuf* sbuf = cout.rdbuf();
    cout.rdbuf(file.rdbuf());
    cout << "This is sent to file" << endl;
    cout.rdbuf(sbuf);
    cout << "This is also sent to prompt" << endl;
    return 0;
}

3) I find cout more readable, especially when we have many parameters.

One problem with cout is the formatting options. Formatting the data (precision, justificaton, etc.) in printf is easier.

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With primitives, it probably doesn't matter entirely which one you use. I say where it gets usefulness is when you want to output complex objects.

For example, if you have a class,

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

class Something
{
public:
        Something(int x, int y, int z) : a(x), b(y), c(z) { }
        int a;
        int b;
        int c;

        friend ostream& operator<<(ostream&, const Something&);
};

ostream& operator<<(ostream& o, const Something& s)
{
        o << s.a << ", " << s.b << ", " << s.c;
        return o;
}

int main(void)
{
        Something s(3, 2, 1);

        // output with printf
        printf("%i, %i, %i\n", s.a, s.b, s.c);

        // output with cout
        cout << s << endl;

        return 0;
}

Now the above might not seem all that great, but let's suppose you have to output this in multiple places in your code. Not only that, let's say you add a field "int d." With cout, you only have to change it in once place. However, with printf, you'd have to change it in possibly a lot of places and not only that, you have to remind yourself which ones to output.

With that said, with cout, you can reduce a lot of times spent with maintenance of your code and not only that if you re-use the object "Something" in a new application, you don't really have to worry about output.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, to add about the performance thing, I'd say that you shouldn't output anything at all if your application is made for performance. Any sort of output to std is rather expensive and slow. I say you should avoid it and only output when it is absolutely necessary to do so. –  Daniel May 20 '10 at 18:04

of course you can write 'Something' a bit better to keep maintenance:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

class Something
{
public:
        Something(int x, int y, int z) : a(x), b(y), c(z) { }
        int a;
        int b;
        int c;

        friend ostream& operator<<(ostream&, const Something&);

        void print() const { printf("%i, %i, %i\n", a, b, c); }
};

ostream& operator<<(ostream& o, const Something& s)
{
        o << s.a << ", " << s.b << ", " << s.c;
        return o;
}

int main(void)
{
        Something s(3, 2, 1);

        // output with printf
        s.print(); // Simple as well, isn't it?

        // output with cout
        cout << s << endl;

        return 0;
}

And a bit extended test of cout vs. printf, added a test of 'double', if anyone wants to do more testing (VS2008, release version of the executable):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>

class TimedSection {
    char const *d_name;
    //timespec d_start;
    clock_t d_start;

    public:
        TimedSection(char const *name) :
            d_name(name)
        {
            //clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &d_start);
            d_start = clock();
        }
        ~TimedSection() {
            clock_t end;
            //clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, &end);
            end = clock();
            double duration = /*1e3 * (end.tv_sec - d_start.tv_sec) +
                              1e-6 * (end.tv_nsec - d_start.tv_nsec);
                              */
                              (double) (end - d_start) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;

            std::cerr << d_name << '\t' << std::fixed << duration * 1000.0 << " ms\n"; 
        }
};

int main() {
    const int iters = 1000000;
    char const *text = "01234567890123456789";
    {
        TimedSection s("cout with only endl");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            std::cout << std::endl;
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("cout with only '\\n'");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            std::cout << '\n';
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("printf with only '\\n'");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            printf("\n");
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("cout with string constant and endl");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            std::cout << "01234567890123456789" << std::endl;
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("cout with string constant and '\\n'");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            std::cout << "01234567890123456789\n";
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("printf with string constant and '\\n'");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            printf("01234567890123456789\n");
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("cout with some stuff and endl");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            std::cout << text << "01234567890123456789" << i << std::endl;
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("cout with some stuff and '\\n'");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            std::cout << text << "01234567890123456789" << i << '\n';
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("printf with some stuff and '\\n'");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            printf("%s01234567890123456789%i\n", text, i);
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("cout with formatted double (width & precision once)");
        std::cout << std::fixed << std::scientific << std::right << std::showpoint;
        std::cout.width(8);
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            std::cout << text << 8.315 << i << '\n';
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("cout with formatted double (width & precision on each call)");
        std::cout << std::fixed << std::scientific << std::right << std::showpoint;

        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            { std::cout.width(8);
              std::cout.precision(3);
              std::cout << text << 8.315 << i << '\n';
            }
    }
    {
        TimedSection s("printf with formatted double");
        for (int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
            printf("%8.3f%i\n", 8.315, i);
    }
}

The result is:

cout with only endl 6453.000000 ms
cout with only '\n' 125.000000 ms
printf with only '\n'   156.000000 ms
cout with string constant and endl  6937.000000 ms
cout with string constant and '\n'  1391.000000 ms
printf with string constant and '\n'    3391.000000 ms
cout with some stuff and endl   9672.000000 ms
cout with some stuff and '\n'   7296.000000 ms
printf with some stuff and '\n' 12235.000000 ms
cout with formatted double (width & precision once) 7906.000000 ms
cout with formatted double (width & precision on each call) 9141.000000 ms
printf with formatted double    3312.000000 ms
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, why is endl so much less efficient than '\n'? –  Nicholas Hamilton May 19 at 23:38

I would like say that extensibility lack of printf is not entirely true:
In C, it is true. But in C, there are no real classes.
In C++, it is possible to overload cast operator, so, overloading a char* operator and using printf like this:

Foo bar;
...;
printf("%s",bar);

can be possible, if Foo overload the good operator. Or if you made a good method. In short, printf is as extensible as cout for me.

Technical argument I can see for C++ streams (in general... not only cout.) are:

  • Typesafety. (And, by the way, if I want to print a single '\n' I use putchar('\n')... I will not use a nuke-bomb to kill an insect.).

  • Simpler to learn. (no "complicated" parameters to learn, just to use << and >> operators)

  • Work natively with std::string (for printf there is std::string::c_str(), but for scanf?)

For printf I see:

  • Easier, or at least shorter (in term of characters written) complex formatting. Far more readable, for me (matter of taste I guess).

  • Better control of what the function made (Return how many characters where written and there is the %n formatter: "Nothing printed. The argument must be a pointer to a signed int, where the number of characters written so far is stored." (from printf - C++ Reference)

  • Better debugging possibilities. For same reason as last argument.

My personal preferences go to printf (and scanf) functions, mainly because I love short lines, and because I don't think type problems on printing text are really hard to avoid. The only thing I deplore with C-style functions is that std::string is not supported. We have to go through a char* before giving it to printf (with the std::string::c_str() if we want to read, but how to write?)

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The compiler has no type information for varargs functions, so it won't convert the actual parameter (except default argument promotions, such as standard integral promotions). See 5.2.2p7. A user-defined conversion to char* won't be used. –  Ben Voigt Jul 31 '12 at 2:42

More differences: "printf" returns an integer value (equal to the number of characters printed) and "cout" does not return anything

And.

cout << "y = " << 7; is not atomic.

printf("%s = %d", "y", 7); is atomic.

cout performs typechecking, printf doesn't.

There's no iostream equivalent of "% d"

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cout doesn't return anything because it's an object, not a function. operator<< does return something (normally its left operand, but a false value if there's an error). And in what sense is the printf call "atomic"? –  Keith Thompson Dec 27 '12 at 16:44
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It is like an atomic bomb. printf("%s\n",7); –  artless noise Mar 14 '13 at 2:25

printf() is a function whereas cout is a variable.

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I did a roll-back because, although the answer itself may be wrong, it is still a genuine answer. If you (correctly) think the answer is wrong, you have two options: 1) add a comment or 2) add a new answer (or do both). Don't change someone's answer to such that it says something completely different from what was intended by the author. –  Mark Jul 15 at 16:27
cout<< "Hello";
printf("%s", "Hello"); 

Both are used to print values. They have completely different syntax. C++ has both, C only has printf.

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... what? did you mixup something? –  xtofl May 20 '10 at 10:08
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Sometimes SO depresses me. –  anon May 20 '10 at 10:16
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The function names had been reversed: cout was used with the printf syntax, and printf was used with the cout syntax. Shouldn't have even been accepted! –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi May 20 '10 at 11:12
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There should be a badge for worst answer but selected as correct. –  Ed S. Jun 28 '10 at 17:28
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Although this is certainty not the best answer, I don't understand how scatman is being punished for his answer only because it was picked as the best answer. xbit has a way worse answer IMO but has -1 vote. I'm not saying xbit should be down voted any more, but I don't see it being fair to down vote scatman for the OP's mistake anymore than it has to be... –  Jesse Sep 4 '10 at 20:35

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