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For example. Lets say we have a stackpanel on a form. Its full of both Grids and Labels. I want to loop through all the Grids and do some operation on them but leave the Lables intact. At the moment I am doing it this way.

foreach(UIElement element in m_stacker.Children)
{
    Grid block = element as Grid;
    if(block != null)
    {
      //apply changes here
    }
}

So i'm using the fact that "as" returns null if it cannot cast into the required type. Is this an ok thing to do or is there a better solution to this problem?

share|improve this question
7  
Actually, that's probably the most common use case for as. – R. Martinho Fernandes May 20 '10 at 11:22
    
Thanks for all the response guys. I'll stick with "as" looks like its the correct thing to do. – DrLazer May 20 '10 at 12:47
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes, it's the right way to do it (considering "applying changes" will need to use the cast result).

However, if you are not going to use the cast return value, you can simply use is.

Using is and then casting again with the cast operator (parenthesis) is frowned upon.

share|improve this answer

What about OfType()?

foreach( var grid  in m_stacker.Children.OfType<Grid>() ) { ... }

This will loop only over the children of type Grid, so no need to cast or check the type at all.

share|improve this answer
3  
In fact, OfType<T>() is doing internally exactly the same. ;-) – Oliver May 20 '10 at 11:36
3  
@Oliver: but the code looks more readably and is shorter this way. – tanascius May 20 '10 at 11:38
1  
OfType is a good way to filter out elements of a type in a collection. However, if you want to do different things with different objects in a single collection (var g = o as Grid; if (g != null) { /* do this */ } else { var c = o as Canvas; if (c != null) { /* do that */ } }), you'll have to iterate the collection a few times with OfType -- and when you have a single object, rather than a collection, it's not a choice. – Mehrdad Afshari May 20 '10 at 11:43
    
@Mehrdad: that is correct, thanks for pointing it out. But for this question the OP wants to get items of one type - and then OfType is appropriate. – tanascius May 20 '10 at 11:49
    
Definitely. Just wanted to point out that OfType is not a replacement for as. It's kind of a replacement for a foreach and as. – Mehrdad Afshari May 20 '10 at 11:51

It will work fine. What you can do is however just use "is".

foreach(UIElement element in m_stacker.Children)
{
    if(element is Grid)
    {
      //apply changes here
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Only if you don't need access to properties and methods of Grid. – ChrisF May 20 '10 at 11:21
    
It's obvious you need to cast it. :) – sovanesyan May 20 '10 at 13:20

If you are going to use block as a Grid then this is exactly the right way to code it.

Checking using is (to my mind) produces less readable code as illustrated in the following two bad examples:

if (element is Grid)
{
    Grid block = element as Grid;
    // Do stuff
}

if (element is Grid)
{
    Grid block = (Grid)element;
    // Do stuff
}

Don't do either of these.

You're saying if element is a grid then cast it.

share|improve this answer
    
Code Analysis recommends don't do like you wrote. The best approach as it think to use operator as and check to null. – abatishchev May 20 '10 at 11:31
    
@abatishchev - Agreed - I was highlighting what you shouldn't do. – ChrisF May 20 '10 at 11:33
    
I agree. Although, there is absolutely nothing wrong with using 'is' I think 'as' is definitely better in most situations. – Brian Gideon May 20 '10 at 13:02
    
what's Code Analysis when it's at home? – DrLazer May 24 '10 at 9:18

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