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I am trying to use the Wifimanager to calculate the Signal Level of the access points found during a scan.

I am using the following method:

WifiManager.calculateSignalLevel(int, int)

But it appears to always return the same int no matter what the RSSI level is.

Here is my code:


public int calculateQoS(int aRSSI){

    signalLevel = WifiManager.calculateSignalLevel(RSSI, 5);

    return signalLevel;

}

public void testCalculateQoS(){

            Log.d("signal", "signal = : "
                    + connMonitor.calculateQoS(-44)
                    + " " + connMonitor.calculateQoS(-80)
                    + " " + connMonitor.calculateQoS(-120)
                    + " " + connMonitor.calculateQoS(-20));

        }

The logging outputs 1 for all the test cases for calculateQoS(int).

Am I missing something simple here? Why is the SignalLevel always 1?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It seems that calculateSignalLevel is implemented this way:

public static int calculateSignalLevel(int rssi, int numLevels) {
  if (rssi <= MIN_RSSI) {
      return 0;
  } else if (rssi >= MAX_RSSI) {
      return numLevels - 1;
  } else {
      int partitionSize = (MAX_RSSI - MIN_RSSI) / (numLevels - 1);
      return (rssi - MIN_RSSI) / partitionSize;
  }
}

Maybe this code snippet can explain your problem. Also note:

http://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=2555

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Thank you for this answer and especially for the code of the implementation. According to the references issue (which is still open as today) all values for numLevels above 45 result in a division by zero. –  Ridcully Feb 26 '11 at 14:31

thanks to this question I could prevent problem on lower API versions then the one I'm targetting. So I made this so you can use it on any platform version.

public int getWifiSignalStrength(Context context){
    int MIN_RSSI        = -100;
    int MAX_RSSI        = -55;  
    int levels          = 101;
    WifiManager wifi    = (WifiManager) context.getSystemService(Context.WIFI_SERVICE);            
    WifiInfo info       = wifi.getConnectionInfo(); 
    int rssi            = info.getRssi();

    if (android.os.Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= android.os.Build.VERSION_CODES.ICE_CREAM_SANDWICH){
        return WifiManager.calculateSignalLevel(info.getRssi(), levels);
    } else {             
        // this is the code since 4.0.1
        if (rssi <= MIN_RSSI) {
            return 0;
        } else if (rssi >= MAX_RSSI) {
            return levels - 1;
        } else {
            float inputRange = (MAX_RSSI - MIN_RSSI);
            float outputRange = (levels - 1);
            return (int)((float)(rssi - MIN_RSSI) * outputRange / inputRange);
        }
    }
}//end method
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This issue is only in android 2.3,
you can replace it with latest code of WiFiManger of an android 4.2

Here is the code:

public int calculateSignalLevel(int rssi, int numLevels) {
    if(rssi <= MIN_RSSI) {
        return 0;
    } else if(rssi >= MAX_RSSI) {
        return numLevels - 1;
    } else {
        float inputRange = (MAX_RSSI - MIN_RSSI);
        float outputRange = (numLevels - 1);
        if(inputRange != 0)
            return (int) ((float) (rssi - MIN_RSSI) * outputRange / inputRange);
    }
    return 0;
}
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