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I have to code a simple C application that creates a process and a child (fork()) and I have to do an operation. Parent initializes the values and child calculates. I write this:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

typedef struct {
    int op1;
    char op;
    int op2;
} Operation;

Operation *varOP;

void finalResult()
{
    float result = 0;
    if(varOP->op == '+') result = (varOP->op1 + varOP->op2);
    if(varOP->op == '-') result = (varOP->op1 - varOP->op2);
    if(varOP->op == '*') result = (varOP->op1 * varOP->op2);
    if(varOP->op == '+') result = (varOP->op1 / varOP->op2)
    printf("%f",result);
}

int main () {
    int p;
    varOP  = (Operation *)malloc(sizeof(Operation));
    p = fork();
    if(p == 0) // If child
    {
        signal(SIGUSR1, finalResult );
        pause();
    }

    if(p > 0) // If parent
    {
        varOP->op = '+';
        varOP->op1 = 2;
        varOP->op2 = 3;
        kill(p, SIGUSR1);
        wait(NULL);
    }
    return 0;
}

But my child is never called. Is there something wrong with my code? Thanks for your help!

share|improve this question
2  
For a moment, it sounded like this question should have been on answers.modernfather.com :) –  Thorarin May 20 '10 at 12:49
    
Ahah not really the same problem ;) –  Pierre May 20 '10 at 12:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your sample code also has a more fundamental problem: each process has its own data space, and so your technique of sending information to the child via the heap will not work. One solution is to use a pipe. This adds only four more lines to your code:

typedef struct {
    int op1;
    char op;
    int op2;
}Operation;

Operation *varOP;

static int pipe_fds[2]; /* <-- added */

static void finalResult(void)
{
    float result = 0;
    read(pipe_fds[0], varOP, sizeof(Operation)); /* <-- added */
    if(varOP->op == '+') result = (varOP->op1 + varOP->op2);
    if(varOP->op == '-') result = (varOP->op1 - varOP->op2);
    if(varOP->op == '*') result = (varOP->op1 * varOP->op2);
    if(varOP->op == '/') result = (varOP->op1 / varOP->op2); /* <-- typo */

    printf("%f\n",result);
}

int main (void) 
{
    int p;
    pipe(pipe_fds); /* <-- added */
    varOP = (Operation *)malloc(sizeof(Operation)); 
    p = fork();

    if(p == 0) // If child
    {
        signal(SIGUSR1, finalResult );
        pause();
    }

    if(p > 0) // If parent
    {
        varOP->op = '+';
        varOP->op1 = 2;
        varOP->op2 = 3;
        write(pipe_fds[1], varOP, sizeof(Operation)); /* <-- added */
        kill(p, SIGUSR1);
        wait(NULL);
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried your solution, it's working well. Thanks ! I posted a code that use memory segmentation but unsuccessful :( –  Pierre May 20 '10 at 15:42
    
It would be more reliable to dispense with the signal handler altogether and just directly call the finalResult() function where the child currently calls signal(); pause();. The pipe will take care of synchronisation in this case; with the current code, the child can miss the signal because there is no guarantee that it will execute signal() before the parent executes kill(). –  caf May 21 '10 at 0:33
    
@caf: I agree with both your points: signals are unnecessary and arguably wrong here, and the code is incorrect by calling signal() too late. I did mean to mention the second, and it could be the cause of the original issue--'my child is never called'--but instead just focused on the primary misconception, which is surprising widespread. –  Joseph Quinsey May 21 '10 at 2:44
    
And of course printf() is not a POSIX.1 safe function for signal handlers. –  Joseph Quinsey May 21 '10 at 3:05

It may be that the child has not yet executed the signal() call when the parent calls kill().

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I agree with you but I don't know how to resolve it :( –  Pierre May 20 '10 at 12:48
    
You could send a signal from the child to the parent. –  Rudi May 20 '10 at 12:57
    
yes but I don't think it's the solution because this is the child which must be read at the end. I'm a little bit lost ... –  Pierre May 20 '10 at 13:01
    
You can simply add a call to sleep(1) at the start of the parent block. This way you can make sure* that the child is ready when you kill. (*sure at 99.9999999 %) Maybe sleep(0) could do the trick? –  Didier Trosset May 20 '10 at 13:31

Thanks Joseph it is working well ! I'm tried to do it with memory segementation and I have the same problem -_-


#include 
#include 
#include 
#include 
#include 

#include 
#include 
#include 

typedef struct {
    int op1;
    char op;
    int op2;
}Operation;


int id;

void hand()
{
    Operation *varOP  = (Operation*) shmat(id, NULL, SHM_R); 
    shmdt((char *) varOP):
    float result = 0;

    switch (varOP->op) {
        case '+':
            result = (varOP->op1 + varOP->op2);
            break;
        case '-':
            result = (varOP->op1 - varOP->op2);
            break;
        case '*':
            result = (varOP->op1 * varOP->op2);
            break;
        case '/':
            result = (varOP->op1 / varOP->op2);
            break;
        default:
            result = 0;
            break;
    }

    printf("%f",result);
    exit(0);
}

int main () {

    int p;
    key_t cle;

    p = fork();

    cle = ftok(getenv("titi"), 'A');
    id = shmget(cle, sizeof(Operation),0);

    if(p == 0) // Si fils
    {
        signal(SIGUSR1,hand);
        while (1);
        exit(0);
    }

    if(p > 0)
    {
        Operation *varOP  = (Operation*) shmat(id, NULL, SHM_W); 
        varOP->op = '+';
        varOP->op1 = 2;
        varOP->op2 = 3;
        shmdt((char *) varOP);
        kill(p, SIGUSR1);

        wait(NULL);
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think the problem here is that in hand() you are calling shmdt() too soon (in testing with CYGWIN). –  Joseph Quinsey May 20 '10 at 18:22
    
Yes you are right. It's good now. Thanks ! –  Pierre May 21 '10 at 5:41

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