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I have a plain text list like this:

I am the first top-level list item
  I am his son
  Me too
Second one here
  His son
  His daughter
    I am the son of the one above
    Me too because of the indentation
  Another one

And I would like to turn that into:

<ul>
  <li>I am the first top-level list-item
    <ul>
      <li>I am his son</li>
      <li>Me too</li>
    </ul>
  </li>
  <li>Second one here
    <ul>
      <li>His son</li>
      <li>His daughter
        <ul>
          <li>I am the son of the one above</li>
          <li>Me too because of the indentation</li>
        </ul>
      </li>
      <li>Another one</li>
    </ul>
  </li>
</ul>

How would one go about doing that?

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8  
Don't people enjoy figuring out this kind of thing for themselves anymore? –  Robusto May 20 '10 at 12:56
5  
He gives the people who DO like to find these things out for themselves a chance instead! –  sshow May 20 '10 at 13:00
    
is your plain text format fixed, or could it be adapted a little? –  ax. May 20 '10 at 13:53
    
@ax: What did you have in mind? @robusto: As I understand, this is a place to ask programming related questions. I asked this programming related question because I couldn't solve it myself. –  morbusg May 20 '10 at 15:19
1  
@morbusg: Sorry, didn't mean to be snarky. All I meant was, this is the kind of problem that makes programming fun for me. It's an oasis of puzzle-type fun in a desert of figuring out why this or that API call didn't work, etc. –  Robusto May 20 '10 at 15:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This code does work as expected, but the titles are printed on a new line.

require "rubygems"
require "builder"

def get_indent(line)
  line.to_s =~ /(\s*)(.*)/
  $1.size
end

def create_list(lines, list_indent = -1, 
       b = Builder::XmlMarkup.new(:indent => 2, :target => $stdout))
  while not lines.empty?
    line_indent = get_indent lines.first

    if line_indent == list_indent
      b.li {
        b.text! lines.shift.strip + $/
        if get_indent(lines.first) > line_indent
          create_list(lines, line_indent, b)
        end
      }
    elsif line_indent < list_indent
      break
    else
      b.ul {
        create_list(lines, line_indent, b)
      }
    end
  end
end
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I already marked this answer as accepted, but then I realized there is one slight issue: the list-items shouldn't close if there is a contained list. –  morbusg May 20 '10 at 16:08

You could probably do so by doing some simple find & replace stuff. Programs like TextWrangler on the mac, Notepad++ on Windows, and possibly gedit on linux (not sure how well its find stuff works with complicated stuff), can search for newlines and replace them with other things. Start with the highest level stuff and work your way in (start with the stuff without spaces at the front and work in). You will likely have to experiment a bit to get the right stuff. If this is something you want to do on a regular basis you could probably make a small script, but I doubt that is the case.

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1  
i think he is asking about how to do this in ruby. –  ax. May 20 '10 at 13:04
    
Ah, didn't see the tag. I just looked at the title and description. –  wilbbe01 May 20 '10 at 14:24

I never used ruby but the usual algorithm stays the same:

  1. Create a data structure like this:
    Node => (Text => string, Children => array of Nodes)
  2. Read a line
  3. Check if indent is higher than current indent
  4. If yes, append the Line to the Children of the current Node and call the method recursively with the node as active. Continue from 2.
  5. Check if indent is equal to current indent.
  6. If yes, append the line to the active node. Continue from 2.
  7. Check if the indent is lower than the current indent.
  8. If yes, return from the method.
  9. Repeat until EOF.

For output:

1. print <ul>
2. Take the first node, print <li>node.Text
3. If there are child nodes (count of node.Children > 0) recurse to 1.
4. print </li>
5. take next node, continue from 2.
6. print </ul>
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Apparently I can only choose one answer as an accepted answer, so although your answer is one, I am sorry I cannot mark it as one (I chose Yossi's because it was in ruby). –  morbusg May 20 '10 at 15:54

transform the input into Haml, then render that as HTML

require 'haml'

def text_to_html(input)
  indent = -1
  haml = input.gsub(/^( *)/) do |match|
    line_indent = $1.length
    repl = line_indent > indent ? "#{$1}%ul\n" : ''
    indent = line_indent
    repl << "  #{$1}%li "
  end
  Haml::Engine.new(haml).render
end

puts text_to_html(<<END)
I am the first top-level list item
  I am his son
  Me too
Second one here
  His son
  His daughter
    I am the son of the one above
    Me too because of the indentation
  Another one
END

results in

<ul>
  <li>I am the first top-level list item</li>
  <ul>
    <li>I am his son</li>
    <li>Me too</li>
  </ul>
  <li>Second one here</li>
  <ul>
    <li>His son</li>
    <li>His daughter</li>
    <ul>
      <li>I am the son of the one above</li>
      <li>Me too because of the indentation</li>
    </ul>
    <li>Another one</li>
  </ul>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
This closes the list-item when it has a sub-list. ie. <li>Something</li><ul>... vs. <li>Something<ul>...</ul></li> –  morbusg May 20 '10 at 17:03

Old topic, but... Looks like I found a way to make Glenn Jackman code html valid (avoid <ul> with child <ul>).
I'm using strings with tab indentation.

    require 'haml'
    class String
       def text2htmllist
         tabs = -1
         topUL=true
         addme=''

         haml = self.gsub(/^([\t]*)/) do |match|
           line_tabs = match.length

           if ( line_tabs > tabs )
                if topUL
                    repl = "#{match}#{addme}%ul\n"
                    topUL=false
                else
                    repl = "#{match}#{addme}%li\n"
                    addme += "\t"
                    repl += "#{match}#{addme}%ul\n"
                end
           else
              repl = ''
              addme = addme.gsub(/^[\t]/,'') if ( line_tabs < tabs ) #remove one \t 
           end
           tabs = line_tabs
           repl << "\t#{match}#{addme}%li "

         end
         puts haml
         Haml::Engine.new(haml).render
       end
    end #String class

    str = <<FIM
    I am the first top-level list item
        I am his son
        Me too
    Second one here
        His son
        His daughter
            I am the son of the one above
            Me too because of the indentation
        Another one
    FIM

    puts str.text2htmllist

Produces:

%ul
    %li I am the first top-level list item
    %li
        %ul
            %li I am his son
            %li Me too
    %li Second one here
    %li
        %ul
            %li His son
            %li His daughter
            %li
                %ul
                    %li I am the son of the one above
                    %li Me too because of the indentation
            %li Another one
<ul>
  <li>I am the first top-level list item</li>
  <li>
    <ul>
      <li>I am his son</li>
      <li>Me too</li>
    </ul>
  </li>
  <li>Second one here</li>
  <li>
    <ul>
      <li>His son</li>
      <li>His daughter</li>
      <li>
        <ul>
          <li>I am the son of the one above</li>
          <li>Me too because of the indentation</li>
        </ul>
      </li>
      <li>Another one</li>
    </ul>
  </li>
</ul>
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